Matt Harwood

1940 Pontiac DeLuxe Six Sedan *SOLD*

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*SOLD* Over the past few months, I've been making more of an effort to gather affordable, quality cars that are ready to enjoy. We've had many discussions here on this forum, as well as in my shop, about the cost of the hobby driving people away and only late-model leftovers seem to be available to guys on a budget. I decided to do something about that. We recently sold a 1923 Dodge and a 1924 Maxwell, both $16,000 cars that were ready to tour and which would introduce people to the Nickel Era. I sold a nice little Mustang coupe for about $13,000 not too long ago to a young woman who wanted to enjoy the same car her mother had. I sold a Beetle convertible to a young family who just always wanted one. So it's with that in mind that I grabbed this handsome 1940 Pontiac sedan, hoping that some younger person with somewhat limited means would want a taste of the pre-war era.

 

It appears that this handsome Pontiac enjoyed a frame-on restoration not too long ago, perhaps with in the last 10 or 12 years. The color is called Parma Wine, which, despite the awful name, is a correct 1940 Pontiac color (it appears that this car was originally code 80, Black). It's nicely finished and the paint is in decent shape with only a few micro-scratches from being washed and polished over the years, and there's some checking on the deck lid which is probably a prep issue--it's limited to that area alone. Otherwise it looks pretty good and will show well at local events. Most of the chrome is nice, with some being restored and some original but it all looks right and doesn't stand out. I'm not expert enough to know if the interior matches code 92, but the striped cloth looks period-appropriate and is in great shape. Carpets, door panels, and headliner are nice too. Gauges have likely been restored but the clock and radio are not working. The trunk is incorrectly upholstered with black carpets, but it looks trim and has a matching spare and a jack stowed in the tool tray. The 223 cubic inch inline-6 is one of those little engines that punches way above its weight class and the Pontiac zips around town pretty nicely and I've had it on the highway at about 55 MPH without any stress. It shifts well, brakes are good, and while I don't think the body has been off the frame you can see that the floors are in excellent condition--this has never been a rusty car. There's some grunge, but it's pretty darned clean. Those Goodyear wide whites dress it up and I like the design of the tread, making this Poncho look pretty upscale.

 

Price is $14,900 and for that you get a lot of car that's ready to drive and show at casual events. It drives very well, it has no issues that will stop you from having fun, and it's unusual enough that you can stand out among all the Mavericks and '70s Novas that are in its price class. Get in and start having fun!

 

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Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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Matt,

Pictures show a nice car at a fair price.

Purists won't like the car not matching the data plate, but life's tough.

With just a little work in the engine room and underneath someone could have a real show stopper.

She kind of looks like if you took a '40 Chevy and a '40 Buick, put them in a bag and shook it up, this is what you would get.

Unusual enough at local shows to draw some attention, and certainly good enough for a car club member's ride.

 

Mike in Colorado

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Well, don't know/care about the data plate, but regarding cleaning up the engine compartment & undercarriage : By the time I would have a couple years ownership, cleanup would be a major undertaking. This would be a comfortable beauty to drive slowly savoring the beautiful scenery all over the USA and Canada. Dad had a '39 Pont',after the first car I knew him to own, a '33 Bu'. Dad raced flatland steam passenger trains (and lost - I kinda think if mom had been at the wheel it would have been the train on the losing end), in Eastern Wisconsin in the '39. Then he bought a brand new '50 Willys Jeep station wagon. My parents gave me a passion for their passion (long distance, long duration  car cruising) and I out did them in my time. 

 

Dad took his last cruise a 1/4 century ago. It would be great conjuring up his spirit behind the wheel of this '40. It is probably close enough to get the feeling of his '39. From my standpoint, this one would  be the most roadworthy fun for the money.

 

                                                          Sigh !  Too many miles, too little time.    -   Cadillac Carl 

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A handsome car and as a semi young person, (just turned 32 this last week) with a prewar car, I think what you're doing is great! I meet plenty of people around my age who would love to get into the hobby, but are put off by all of the costs that get thrown around between costs of the car, potential repairs, paint and body work, and where something like this.  where the cost to buy something like is in the low-mid teens, they can get in and drive it, tinker here and there and make repairs while being able to enjoy it, would seem a lot closer in reach than the high dollar cars what they may have seen on one of the televised auctions.

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This is what the hobby is all about.  Finding a car that’s affordable, enjoying how it operates, learning some things about maintaining it and membership in a community of like minded people who are anxious to share your enthusiasm.  

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Fun is what it’s all about. Looks like a nice car. 👍

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Looks to be a nice car for not a lot of money.

The new owner should enjoy it

 

On 10/3/2019 at 1:37 AM, FLYER15015 said:

...

She kind of looks like if you took a '40 Chevy and a '40 Buick, put them in a bag and shook it up, this is what you would get.

Unusual enough at local shows to draw some attention, and certainly good enough for a car club member's ride.

 

Mike in Colorado

The basic body shell is the GM B body, used by 1939 & 1940 40 & 60 series Buick, some Ponti, Old & Caddy & LaSalle.  Chev used the A body

The ss window revel moldings are good.  For Buick used on series 60 Century, but not series 40 Special

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Pontiac had all 3 GM bodies in 1940. I have seen them parked next to each other at an Early Times Chapter (flathead Pontiac club) event. 1940 seems to be a really popular year in the club. This particular is 40 really nice. Congratulations to the new owner!

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