Aaron65

Wanted: '40s/'50s Buick Dog Dish Hubcaps and Trim Rings

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My beloved '53 Special (not the one shown below) will probably need new tires next year, as its Coker Classics are 10 years old. I drive the car at least 750 miles a year, so I was thinking of saving the $750 or so and just going with some blackwall radials, and I was thinking about doing something along the lines of a car I saw on v8Buick.com (pictured below). Mine sits at stock height, but I'm considering some dog dish hubcaps with either the "Buick" script or wide spaced block lettering and some trim rings. It looks like CARS, Inc. sells a reproduction set, but they're $400. My car is quite nice, but not 100% perfect, so if anyone has a nice driver quality set they'd be willing to part with, I'm in the market. Thanks for listening!

'53 Special trim rings 2.jpg

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THIS beauty ring that I bought for my Ford truck was exactly like the ones that came on my Buick...and much cheaper than Buick suppliers.  Caps should be easy; clips if not present are hard to find.

If those Coker Classics are bias ply, you can count on another 10 years out of them unless flat spotted from sitting.

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They are bias-ply tires...The car certainly sits a fair share throughout the year, but I drive it enough that the tires don't flat spot.  The Coker website recommends the same thing as the other suppliers/manufacturers, to replace tires every 10 years.  Just for education's sake, why would a bias ply last longer?

 

Thanks for the link to the trim rings!

Edited by Aaron65 (see edit history)

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2 hours ago, Aaron65 said:

My beloved '53 Special (not the one shown below) will probably need new tires next year, as its Coker Classics are 10 years old. I drive the car at least 750 miles a year, so I was thinking of saving the $750 or so and just going with some blackwall radials, and I was thinking about doing something along the lines of a car I saw on v8Buick.com (pictured below). Mine sits at stock height, but I'm considering some dog dish hubcaps with either the "Buick" script or wide spaced block lettering and some trim rings. It looks like CARS, Inc. sells a reproduction set, but they're $400. My car is quite nice, but not 100% perfect, so if anyone has a nice driver quality set they'd be willing to part with, I'm in the market. Thanks for listening!

'53 Special trim rings 2.jpg

 

 Aaron, I have them. The block letters from '41 to '50. Fair to good condition. Rings as well.  I am pretty sure the '53 wheels are the same.

  PM your phone # and we can talk.   

 

  Ben

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When you figure out how much you are planning to save don't forget to add in the cost of the alternate tires to the expense.

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Yeah, I figure it will be a savings of several hundred dollars at least when everything's added up; but perhaps more importantly, I think it will drive a lot nicer with radials.  It's the only car I own with bias ply tires, and while I'm certainly used to it and don't mind it, it might be nice if the car didn't have such a mind of its own on grooved highways and over ruts left by Michigan's heavily loaded trucks.

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On 9/29/2019 at 11:31 AM, Aaron65 said:

They are bias-ply tires...The car certainly sits a fair share throughout the year, but I drive it enough that the tires don't flat spot.  The Coker website recommends the same thing as the other suppliers/manufacturers, to replace tires every 10 years.  Just for education's sake, why would a bias ply last longer?

 

Thanks for the link to the trim rings!

 

         My considerable experience with old tires bears out the greater longevity of the bias type over radials -- assuming protection from weathering.

When my 5+year-old, low-mileage radials have failed, it has invariably been due to separations in the splicing of sidewall cord structures, initially evidenced by bulges and irregularities appearing in the sidewall.  Since the bias design uses a completely different architecture, with stiffer, stronger fully integrated sidewalls, splicing does not figure in.

          Case in point:  the Coker bias whitewalls that I'm currently running on my '41 Cadillac are doing fine after nearly 30 years, as are the heavily loaded private-label 700:15s I've been using for 20 years on my boat trailer (stored indoors) -- while I can barely get 5 years out of premium radials installed on my 1500-mile-per-year Suburban (again, stored indoors).

          Concerning a different tire issue, I have had problems with recent radial whitewalls (Cokers and Diamondbacks) turning brown in short order, possibly due to leaching of black tire solvents into the whitewall.  Complaints to suppliers only result in their attempts to blame me for "stacking" the tires before installation -- a practice I assiduously avoid.  Meanwhile, my old bias whitewalls (including an ancient 8.20/15 from the early '50s that I use as a spare) remain snow white.

          Any theories on that one?

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Hi Aaron -  take a look at the photo of the hub caps that I have - you could put the script on 1 side and the block letter on the other side of car!  let me know if you are interested in any of these.

IMG_0886.JPG

IMG_0887.JPG

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On 9/29/2019 at 1:31 PM, Aaron65 said:

Just for education's sake, why would a bias ply last longer?

Steel belts don't stick to rubber for more than 5-7years.

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