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Ed Luddy

Drove a 1955 Buick Roadmaster Riviera today. Bias ply in the rain

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With Bias Ply Tires I found that tire pressure needs to be as suggested in the owners manual. Usually they call for Bias Ply's around 26 pounds. If you forget and over inflate Bias Ply's to what newer Radials air pressures call for such as 45+ pounds the older cars can't handle it. Also, there are New Shocks designed for Vintage Cars that  really help. I put Gabriel Shocks For Vintage Cars per what they recommended, for my  '68 AMX running Bias Ply Tires, and have found that this combination really made the car handle close to how it handles with Radials.

 

Forgot to mention, the first car I restored 40 years ago was a '54 Pontiac two door. I put Radial Tires on it. It had a straight 8 Flat Head and Manual 3 on the Tree Trany. Only problem with it was worn engine mounts. When I went into a turn too hard the engine must have leaned as it would knock the Glass Fuel Pump Bowl Clip off  stopping fuel flow and killing the engine. The radials were big and raised the A arm too close to the fuel bowl. I figured it out after I had sold it. The Radials were great.

Edited by Doug Novak
added info (see edit history)

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By the way, I have always put some cut pieces of duct tape on the rims to give the teeth in the hubcaps something to better bite into - radials on 50's cars at times can be hubcap throwers. 

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"radials on 50's cars at times can be hubcap throwers" because the increased cornering force flexes the wheel ?

 

Nothing has ever thrown more hubcaps than the Charger in Bullett.

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Just a guess, were the tires purchased in the mid-1990's? Decades go by fast. How long since the plugs were removed to top off the rear shock fluid?

There's an old term, "benevolently neglected". It refers to about $2500 to $3000 worth of deferred maintenance on a shiny car.

 

The second year I owned my '60 Electra we drove to the 100th Buick anniversary in Flint and came through Canada on the QEW in the rain with grace and at pace. Biased tire set #1.

 

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Nuisance speed buzzer set at 85 rain or shine.

 

That is the kind of car that gets sold to a novice buyer and they can't believe how much money they are spending after the purchase. Sometimes they make too many trips to the well after the purchase and Mama puts her foot down. They stay in the garage under the lawn furniture...... more often than you think.

 

Almost two years ago I bought a very complicated BMW. Two days ago I was watching a video about one being restored. The mechanic said "Be prepared to spend $3,000 to $4,000 on service annually. My wife was in the next room and heard that. She teased me later. I said "No, no, no, that's taking it to the dealer. It only costs me a third without paying labor". I average $600 to $800 per car anyway (just should have less).

 

Point is,  cars will have all those misbehavior's if you aren't sinking some into them every year. I am guessing some years the highest expense was on polish. And it don't work that way.

Bernie

 

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2 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

Point is,  cars will have all those misbehavior's if you aren't sinking some into them every year. I am guessing some years the highest expense was on polish. And it don't work that way.

 

Today I was replacing a right rear wheel cylinder in my '65 Skylark, remembering that I did that job when I bought the car in 2003.  Time flies!  Then, the gas tank vent hose started seeping.  I'd NEVER replaced that, and it was ancient.  While I was under there, I noticed that the main hose from the sender to the fuel line was spongy.  I may have done that a while back, but I replaced it again today.  It was an engaging two hours.  Times that by 9 (my total number of cars), and I can understand why I feel like I'm always working on a car!  

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These daze I normally figure about $1500 AFTER I acquire a new car. A decent set of tires is about $800 and a battery (AGM) is a buck and a half. An inexpensive set of sheepskin seat covers is about a Benjamin so past a large already. This also clutters up the garage (have too many stacks of tires and wheels).

 

Oh well is only one more car I am watching but have had several that just "appeared".

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