Jump to content

1934 Chevrolet 3-Window Coupe Survivor *SOLD*


Recommended Posts

000H.thumb.jpg.94c177c7e0f27ea08cde0a4bb6171313.jpg

 

*SOLD* Ordinarily I don't really deal in cars that need work, but the more I look at this remarkably well-preserved little Chevy with just 37,972 original miles, the more I realize it doesn't need any work. It's had just three owners, including the fellow from whom I acquired it who bought it in 1992. His plan was to cut it up into a hot rod, but once he saw how solid, complete, and nice to drive it really was, he just didn't have the heart. And that's why I love it--cars like this don't really exist today because they've all been chopped, channeled, and stuffed full of generic crate motors. Bah.

 

It was originally Arcadian Green, and that's what's mostly on the body. It's been buffed and shined but never repainted and there are, of course, bumps and bruises all over the place. Black fenders somehow didn't fare as well, but that's just surface rust, no perforation or rot. All the trim is intact and in reasonably good shape, including the single taillight out back. Even the mats on the running boards are pretty nice. Biggest dents are those in the left front fender and in the right rear quarter of the roof where it looks like it was hit with a baseball. Both could probably be pushed out by a skillful paintless dent removal guy. If you want to restore it, there's not going to be much metalwork involved, but I think if this were mine to keep, I'd just leave it alone. People love to walk up and just run their hands over it. Go ahead and see--park it anywhere there are shiny cars and watch which one people are drawn to.

 

The all-original interior is equally nice. The brown mohair is almost completely intact with no major rips or tears on the seats or door panels, and only two or three quarter-sized holes in the original headliner. Even the rubber mat is probably circa 1934. All of the gauges are operational, including the fuel gauge, and someone along the line added an aftermarket temperature gauge under the left side of the dash. The horn and windshield wiper aren't working, but the accessory Arvin heater and dome light are. This is a Standard coupe, so there's a trunk instead of a rumble seat, and you can see that the wooden structure and metal floors are excellent.

 

It carries its original 181 cubic inch inline-6 which in 1934 was rated at 60 horsepower (I think). It was rebuilt in the '90s after the most recent owner acquired it because it was frozen--kudos to him for still following through rather than going ahead with the V8 transplant. That was about 6000 miles ago and today it runs great. Turn on the ignition and step on the pedal and it fires easily without even using the choke. I like that he didn't restore the outside of the engine so it still looks right in the otherwise original engine bay. He also rebuilt the carb, which explains why it runs so well, and the entire ignition system is new. It runs at about 170 degrees on the road and makes plenty of electricity. The 3-speed manual shifts nicely, although the clutch is a bit abrupt--more like an on/off switch but that might just be a practice thing, too. I haven't had it on the lift for photos yet, but I expect it to be just as solid underneath as it is up top. There's a new exhaust system that he intentionally aged by using some kind of salt water spray, the brakes have new linings, the gas tank is new, and the wire wheels wear ancient tires that should probably be replaced before you do any long drives. But around town it's just a joy to drive--I didn't want to come back after taking my usual test drive.

 

When was the last time you saw a 3-window coupe that wasn't hot-rod bait? We're probably going to bring this one to the Hershey car corral and hopefully it'll go to a good home where it'll be appreciated for what it is. Like I said, few restored cars can attract attention like this neat survivor. How can you go wrong? Thanks for looking!

 

DSC_0024a.thumb.jpg.e470b7b43261a156ad0bad88dd8bb79c.jpgDSC_0027a.thumb.jpg.9617aa475532b1ca5df6897876c17c9b.jpgDSC_0031a.thumb.jpg.e46e4c33b1349c67829662a646e58b84.jpgDSC_0107a.thumb.jpg.daf1b631d91e26f96f7cee608f3c8798.jpg

 

DSC_0113a.thumb.jpg.913e1c402d97ef5f64dc174201fef2fd.jpgDSC_0056a.thumb.jpg.434616064f877ccf95f39c7188215bfe.jpgDSC_0125a.thumb.jpg.9f49bb68a0154fbba1cb366c3340d944.jpgDSC_0041a.thumb.jpg.f61bd91e70cb66f84a73e7342321dd12.jpg

 

DSC_0047a.thumb.jpg.e4165216b7846e2438db2e5008652d68.jpgDSC_0071a.thumb.jpg.9a5c5102a317c799321a78f3b63b3b3d.jpgDSC_0074a.thumb.jpg.a0cc7317faf9e923206b7536c7648486.jpgDSC_0078a.thumb.jpg.61614476cebb257b84baf39b8493945c.jpg

 

DSC_0080a.thumb.jpg.456fb45966ec53a00b9f1a8f70b96b15.jpgDSC_0153a.thumb.jpg.b36f454ad41524f0067c4d0b7440d02d.jpgDSC_0149a.thumb.jpg.89e8ba9a684be9cc2636cbfab1cc50cd.jpgDSC_0087a.thumb.jpg.b8995f129b1e14efccd4379d3477c5c5.jpg

 

DSC_0145a.thumb.jpg.7d8f105a43b2bb87bf82d5e4ade91a10.jpgDSC_0073a.thumb.jpg.a8b270b3197d8a674ab71a1cb5954f5d.jpgDSC_0059a.thumb.jpg.d78a0bc6a6c6da049cee75273691a767.jpgDSC_0066a.thumb.jpg.da820c81919e707cfd71f4737239a3f2.jpg

 

DSC_0012a.thumb.jpg.5a90d435ba564c3e5fa080125013ff1c.jpgDSC_0021a.thumb.jpg.e52aea9078460f1ca511e542280a84fd.jpg20190917_115249a.thumb.jpg.53d1cb4ba7ef5fcb7cbe3b3dce643d61.jpg

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That’s a great automobile at a very reasonable price............I usually only look at CCCA or HCCA cars. I would own this little Chevy, and that’s about the highest compliment I can give to any car. I’m going to stop looking at it now.......I don’t want to call Matt and buy it.

  • Like 4
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh my, that's a great car....I'm like Ed, I hate to keep looking at the pictures because I keep wanting to call my financial advisor and say screw it, I'm taking money out of the account...as you say, a magnet for admiration next to most any restored car out there...

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here are some undercarriage photos, as requested by a few different people. I note that there's a new gas tank, it appears the transmission has also been rebuilt, there are new motor mounts, plus lots of new parts on the brakes, which work rather well. The only perforation I can see is the little bit in that 1-foot-by-1-foot box under the passenger's seat--don't know what's there, but that's it for rust issues. The rest is just surface scale, as you'd expect. Drives quite well, with a notable absence of squeaks, rattles, and other noises. 

 

20190922_153740a.thumb.jpg.27a4c7bdf16fb383df92a2b37aa2135d.jpg20190922_153816a.thumb.jpg.d3ba3f2dd08e2b793ac5c60ea4bce066.jpg20190922_153859a.thumb.jpg.cfed2c3e2fe327b3391b14a33f6ee5e9.jpg20190922_153842a.thumb.jpg.1163c00b43d65ecccf6ce46303f01068.jpg

 

20190922_154043a.thumb.jpg.ac4b4b2a541264e7309d2f2937feec5e.jpg

 

Here's a short driving video. Cruises nicely at 40-45. Stops straight, steers easily, shifts well. Drives FAR better than the frame-off restored 1948 Buick I was driving an hour earlier.

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

32 minutes ago, mercer09 said:

actually think it sounds good.

 

Me too. An inline 6 sings a nice song. My XK Jags were music to my ears. One advantage of glasspaks is for engine condition monitoring under way. I was upset to see g'paks when I crawled under my '27 Cadillac prior to purchasing it. I have grown to LOVE the soft low flathead V8 drone I get to enjoy hour after hour out on the open road. Nice bark when she fires up also !   -    CC 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It’s the least expensive three window that will scratch that itch you have had for years. I have had three of them in the time you have been talking about buying one,

 

1931 Cadillac 355A Sport Coupe

1932 Pierce Arrow Series 54 Sport Coupe 

1929 Pierce Arrow Series 133 Leather Top Coupe

 

 

AJ- It’s your turn!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, edinmass said:

It’s the least expensive three window that will scratch that itch you have had for years.

 

I was laying in bed last night watching the football game and showing my wife Matt's videos.   She said "that little car can really move".  

 

My town had their fall festival this weekend and on Sunday morning they have a car show.  If I had that coupe I would have been the hit of the show.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One other update while looking at the car this morning: it appears that all the glass has been replaced and there are new rubber weather seals, including the vent windows. Not original but probably a good upgrade.

 

My detail expert and retired Airborne Ranger, Michael Johnson, feels that the dent in the back of the roof is from a bullet, although it didn't punch a hole in the metal. There's a string of other little depressions on the right side of the hood and up the right windshield post that he thinks are graze marks from the car being shot at. None of it penetrated the metal or really even took off much paint, but I'm at a loss to explain what else could have made that series of little depressions. Like this car was pursuing someone who was shooting back at it or something and these are just graze marks. Not like it was shot from the side while stationary or as if it was used for target practice.

 

Just another detail in what might have been a colorful history. The depressions aren't noticeable and even hard to photograph, but if you go looking you can find them. Make up a story and have fun with it!

 

Bullets1.thumb.jpg.be02b91731705330c34f7f361f69a511.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 9/23/2019 at 1:37 PM, Matt Harwood said:

And so it goes... SOLD to a fellow forum member. Only the second time that's ever happened for us. Someone's going to have a lot of fun in this Chevy!

 

Now what should I bring to Hershey?

How about the Pink T-Bird???? Thanks, John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 9/23/2019 at 7:46 AM, Matt Harwood said:

One other update while looking at the car this morning: it appears that all the glass has been replaced and there are new rubber weather seals, including the vent windows. Not original but probably a good upgrade.

 

My detail expert and retired Airborne Ranger, Michael Johnson, feels that the dent in the back of the roof is from a bullet, although it didn't punch a hole in the metal. There's a string of other little depressions on the right side of the hood and up the right windshield post that he thinks are graze marks from the car being shot at. None of it penetrated the metal or really even took off much paint, but I'm at a loss to explain what else could have made that series of little depressions. Like this car was pursuing someone who was shooting back at it or something and these are just graze marks. Not like it was shot from the side while stationary or as if it was used for target practice.

 

Just another detail in what might have been a colorful history. The depressions aren't noticeable and even hard to photograph, but if you go looking you can find them. Make up a story and have fun with it!

 

Bullets1.thumb.jpg.be02b91731705330c34f7f361f69a511.jpg

I see it also took a hit between the two upper arrows on the side of the "A" pillar....

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...