Jump to content

Best Place for an Old Car Guy to Retire?


Recommended Posts

It makes a big difference when you can just open a door from the house and there the cars are. ANY distance you have to travel reduces the likelihood that you will.

ps my property taxes are low because I've been here for 35 years. Also in Orange county and not Orlando proper.  For new residents it is 2x to 3x mine for the same house. Natives get some surprising benefits. Long time ago I chose more garage over a swimming pool.

 

Might check out  carproperty.com

 

Edited by padgett (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/19/2019 at 9:15 AM, 60FlatTop said:

I have lived in New York all my life and surviving just fine. And I heat my garage during winter. January, February, and half of March is not hard to take.

 

My wife won't leave, but my ideal is a main house on Grand Cayman and a small house and big garage close to Savannah, Georgia to keep the cars for play.

 

I hear Bend, Or. is a nice place except for the smoke due to federal land management regulations.

 

One thing is for sure, if there was a place I wanted to live I wouldn't let taxes cause me to live in the second choice or less.

 

Bernie

You must be well off. New York rates as one of the most expensive / lowest dollar value places in the country to live: 

 

https://www.patriotsoftware.com/blog/accounting/average-cost-living-by-state/ 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, John/All:  The house in York PA I was referring to and you mentioned, "Property taxes aren't low in Pennsylvania, but if you are looking at a property with taxes of $17,000, it must be very large and exceptional," is a very reasonable $255K, 49 E Springettsbury Ave in York.  It's the taxes that are $14,771!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Hudsy Wudsy said:

New York rates as one of the most expensive / lowest dollar value places in the country to live: 

 

Hudsy, the average may be high, but New York is

a state of incredible contrasts.  The New York City

area is absurdly expensive, while many beautiful

small towns throughout the rest of the state are

losing population and are extremely affordable.

The vast disparities, when averaged, don't tell the whole 

story.

 

For example, here's a representative small house

in Manhasset, New York (Long Island) for $1,138,000,

with taxes of $15,000 per year.  Its tiny lot is only

one-seventh of an acre:

ISrtr6npf5m3da1000000000.jpg

 

Here is a similar house--probably nicer--in Dunkirk,

New York for $179,000, with taxes $5000 per year.

It's on one acre, seven times the acreage of the other

house.  Notice it's less than ONE-SIXTH the price:

ISv4f3yzsg47nq1000000000.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wasn't going go into details, but my Sister-in-Law moved from Syracuse within the past year and they were almost in a panic towards the end -- fearful that they might never find a buyer for their house. She said that people were leaving the state in a hurry because of the cost of living. I, of course, only know what I've heard. That's why I looked up the info that I included with my post. I'm sorry if I offended anyone. I live in MN, which is relatively expensive compared to our neighbors.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You didn't offend anyone!  Learning about other

areas' lifestyles isn't offensive, but interesting.  I think

it's interesting how some places are so much

less expensive--yet often are better places to live.

 

And to forum friends who are hemmed in by 

high prices, I like to say, "Move somewhere less

expensive, and enjoy your hobby more fully!"

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

Thanks for the update, Greg, and it is good to hear

your accomplishments.  Property taxes aren't low in

Pennsylvania, but if you are looking at a property

with taxes of $17,000, it must be very large and exceptional.

(It probably has the value of a ranch house in the District of

Columbia.)  Instead, figure $6000-7000 for an upper-middle

class house typically. 

 

York is more built-up and has more than its share of crime.

Carlisle, Penna. is a beautiful town with an exceptional

historic district, and plenty of antique-car activities.

Boiling Springs, Penna. is close by and has nice historic

houses circling a picturesque small lake. 

 

Do you prefer a house in the country on several acres,

or an in-town location?  Do you want outbuildings for storage?

Here is what $475,000 can buy you in Carlisle:  A large

historic house with a 3-car garage, but on a main street in town:

 

66467e6403aafd3dfd666ba825424df9l-m292505235od-w1024_h768.jpg

 

That is a nice house.   It is funny in life how you can "know" something but until you experience it you really don't "know it".    For years and years I wanted my own 1905 money pit.   Must  have back stairs, slate roof, carriage house, etc, etc.   I knew it was a bad idea and dodged a few bullets by luck and happenstance (more like 90mm cannon shots).

 

Then you get older and wiser and experience what it is to keep up with even a moderate house that can suck the life and money out of you.   Usually by the time you are in your 50s you are starting to think about less upkeep.

 

Now,  I would still like a car barn bigger than my house, but that urge may be passing soon too.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

You didn't offend anyone!  Learning about other

areas' lifestyles isn't offensive, but interesting.  I think

it's interesting how some places are so much

less expensive--yet often are better places to live.

 

And to forum friends who are hemmed in by 

high prices, I like to say, "Move somewhere less

expensive, and enjoy your hobby more fully!"

 

My wife and I have this discussion all the time.   How do you throw a dart at the map and then move there cold turkey?

 

Typically people move  to an area for a reason,  work, family, etc.   That reason integrates you in to the social fabric of that community.    If the reason is "weather and taxes"  then you don't have that hook to integrate you.    Church and clubs may do it but that could take a while.

 

EDIT:   The biggest bullet I dodged had a carriage house that would easily hold 8 cars as is.  The first time it sat on the market for 5 years before somebody else bought it and poured a HUGE amount of money in to it.  The second time it went on and off the market for 10 years,  a developer bought it,  started parceling out the property for other houses, couldn't sell the main house and it was just torn down so they can build a retirement community.   Shame,  but reality.

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

Expensive and a pain in the XXX, but for fun car overload the Los Angeles area is GREAT !!!

 

You and I my friend are going to disagree on this.   I've only visited so I'm limited to that perspective,  but once you get past the perfect weather (admittedly a huge plus)  thing are not great.

Link to post
Share on other sites

We lived in the Chicago suburbs most of my working life (great place to make a living) our 2900 Sq ft house on 5 acres with a 4 stall horse barn had taxes of $13,000 - 20 years ago went we said enough. Now that house's taxes are just short of 20K.  We moved to Lexington KT and the taxes on 17 acres 3600 sq ft housr were $1300 ! We moved the decimal place over 1 place.  Two years ago those taxes were up to $3600. The upkeep with my bad back/legs was getting to be too much.  So we moved to Aiken SC - 2700 sq ft house (more than we wanted or need) on about 3/4 acre with taxes of $1100/yr.  It's on a golf course so it seems like a lot more land, so many pine trees we can't really see the neighbors.  Weather is usually good (unusually warm this summer but getting back to normal) and the price of houses is very reasonable.  

Now to find some more car guys around the area would be great.

Have fun

dave s 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

"Move somewhere less expensive, and enjoy your hobby more fully!"

Interesting: out of the people who move to Florida, within a year or two half move back. Only natives are comfortable this time of the year. Also what you save in taxes you will spend for AC (electric costs are about the same as property taxes). Did I mention the need for portable generators for when (not if) the power goes out ?

OTOH why would anyone want to live in the "Bahía de los Fumos" ?

And on the gripping hand I recall driving out to Edwards from LAX when the radio announced that the air quality had improved to "unhealthy".

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This long-running thread has had some very interesting comments (and some influence on my looking at Washington and other locations).

 

Just looking at the cost of a house is at best an incomplete picture.  Housing cost is still determined primarily by location.  So a palace in a cornfield in BFE costs less and will stay worth less.  I'm not saying it's not a factor, just not THE factor.  It's more about entry cost than market value.

 

One poster pointed out considering the other factors in what you like to do.  Is access to cultural events and entertainment of the type you like important or not?  This doesn't decide rural vs. urban, but it could make a difference on whether there's a city in the region or not.  Likewise how far is it to a airport (remember travelling)?

 

My personal synthesis on climate is I don't want five months of bad weather.  But I consider bad weather includes both snowy cold and sticky hot, so it eliminates much of both the northern and southern edges of the country.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, alsancle said:

 

You and I my friend are going to disagree on this.   I've only visited so I'm limited to that perspective,  but once you get past the perfect weather (admittedly a huge plus)  thing are not great.

Yes, a lot of people will disagree with me about LA, but the density of people interested in Pre-WWII cars matched to the large number of activities ... - it is a blast.   That said, anyone who has lived in the suburbs and/or commuted into or worked in a larger downtown will probably say NO-THANK-YOU !!!

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, alsancle said:

 

For years and years I wanted my own 1905 money pit. 

 

Then you get older and wiser and experience what it is to keep up with even a moderate house that can suck the life and money out of you.   Usually by the time you are in your 50s you are starting to think about less upkeep.

 

Now,  I would still like a car barn bigger than my house, but that urge may be passing soon too.

 

 

I can kind of relate. 

In my twenties/early-thirties, I used to dream of owning and living in some old, "turn-of-the-century", 3-story manufacturing building (all brick, high mounted, natural light windows, wooden support beams with otherwise open floor plans, etc), near downtown of some metropolitan city and converting it to shop (ground floor), car collection/garage/storage (second floor, accessed via drive-in elevator or ramp), living quarters (third floor) and roof top garden/patio with 25+ yard pool (being a lifelong avid swimmer).

Talk about maintenance/money pit...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The 1905 money pit makes me smile - I grew up in a 1907 house.  It had character.  It also had small rooms, a window AC, and often cantankerous plumbing and electrical.

 

Wait a minute - that sounds like an old car.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, padgett said:

Interesting: out of the people who move to Florida, within a year or two half move back.

My parents lived in Jacksonville for 10 years - they really enjoyed their car club activities and loved Amelia Island Concours, but as far as Car Club activities in their area it was not real active as to car usage - the locals either complained it was too hot or too cold and as a result rarely got their cars out.  Dad said the only real active group with cars was the Model A Club.  I believe they went to Georgia or .. for some gaslight activities, though. There was also the "fun", of taking the cars down to the hospital parking garage and covering them up for hurricanes - that was by the way always a really good "car show" (but after a while my parents decided to just let the cars stand on their own in the house garage and risk it.  By the way, they live in Ohio 15 years now - in Florida they had 3 new roofs on the house in 2 months, including destruction of the original slate roof that has survived untouched from 1917, the longest power outage was a day shy of two weeks, the cars came back all moldy and they ran a dehumidifier heat/AC in the garage, nothing like Panther's in the trees in yard in a suburb off of downtown, and ...

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

Yes, a lot of people will disagree with me about LA, but the density of people interested in Pre-WWII cars matched to the large number of activities ... - it is a blast.   That said, anyone who has lived in the suburbs and/or commuted into or worked in a larger downtown will probably say NO-THANK-YOU !!!

I live about 55 miles east of (downtown) L.A. and prefer my location for aforementioned reasons, including easier/quicker access to (around the year) driving pleasures.

Fortunately, my daily/work commute is less than 5 minutes.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, TTR said:

I can kind of relate. 

In my twenties/early-thirties, I used to dream of owning and living in some old, "turn-of-the-century", 3-story manufacturing building (all brick, high mounted, natural light windows, wooden support beams with otherwise open floor plans, etc), near downtown of some metropolitan city and converting it to shop (ground floor), car collection/garage/storage (second floor, accessed via drive-in elevator or ramp), living quarters (third floor) and roof top garden/patio with 25+ yard pool (being a lifelong avid swimmer).

Talk about maintenance/money pit...

 

I almost fell for that too.   This was for sale for under 200k a couple of years ago.  Has a big ass lift in it that would transport cars to the 2 and 3rd floor.  In an area of a nearby city next to the train station in a part of town being gentrified.   The lot is actually decent sized for outside parking too.   I saw a man cave on the 3rd floor, car storage on the 2nd floor and workshop on the ground floor.

 

I came to my senses.

 

51 Harding St, Worcester, MA for sale Primary Photo- Image 1 of 1

 

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

I almost fell for that too.   This was for sale for under 200k a couple of years ago.  Has a big ass lift in it that would transport cars to the 2 and 3rd floor.  In an area of a nearby city next to the train station in a part of town being gentrified.   The lot is actually decent sized for outside parking too.   I saw a man cave on the 3rd floor, car storage on the 2nd floor and workshop on the ground floor.

 

I came to my senses.

 

51 Harding St, Worcester, MA for sale Primary Photo- Image 1 of 1

 

Yes, the kind of building I meant.

There are still few similar near/in downtown L.A. or S.F. I used to look at  longingly when driving by years/decades ago, but also came to my senses, mainly because lack of $$$s.

And even if I had managed to get something like that, I probably wouldn't want to live in such area now and pretty sure my wife wouldn't had married me if I did.

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

I almost fell for that too.   This was for sale for under 200k a couple of years ago.  Has a big ass lift in it that would transport cars to the 2 and 3rd floor.  In an area of a nearby city next to the train station in a part of town being gentrified.   The lot is actually decent sized for outside parking too.   I saw a man cave on the 3rd floor, car storage on the 2nd floor and workshop on the ground floor.

 

I came to my senses.

 

51 Harding St, Worcester, MA for sale Primary Photo- Image 1 of 1

 

Sort of like the guys that build a garage mahal to work on their cars but spend all their money building it and/or never work on their cars. 

 

I have looked at a few carriage houses - problem is that the way the city evolved the neighborhoods are pretty run down matched to the carriage houses being near derelict - sort of like solving one problem to create a few more. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

Sort of like the guys that build a garage mahal to work on their cars but spend all their money building it and/or never work on their cars. 

 

I have looked at a few carriage houses - problem is that the way the city evolved the neighborhoods are pretty run down matched to the carriage houses being near derelict - sort of like solving one problem to create a few more. 

 

It seems to be a universal problem that the coolest period stuff is sitting in a place you might not want to go.   The building I posted is actually in a really great spot,  lots of gentrified apartments and restaurants going in all around it because of the train station to Boston.   15 minutes from my house,  5 minutes from a major highway.


But doing the math on the renovation (your second point) scuttled the idea. 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thought seriously about the Star Chevrolet building in Bisbee AZ when It was for sale - about 10 miles from my sister's place. Then she reminded me that when there I always woke up with a sore throat - just have trouble with dry climates. So stayed where I am and have a 2000 sq ft 3 bedroom empty nest and 2000 sq. ft of garage space. In an development with an HOA & off through streets behind where Universal later built here. Could do that in the 80's, think would need to Clermont (about 20 miles west) to do today.

 

Before the current unpleasantness there was at least one local show a week, often more, large flea markets at Webster and Daytona,and gatherings at the ACE. Is one this Saturday put one by friends but not sure am willing to leave home yet.

 

Today am working on a 30 year old blown Bose car audio system. In the AC.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a buddy that has his shop in an old Moon dealership building.  Pretty cool building but not in a great area.   A smaller dealership building in rural America somewhere has appeal to it.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, alsancle said:

 

It seems to be a universal problem that the coolest period stuff is sitting in a place you might not want to go.   The building I posted is actually in a really great spot,  lots of gentrified apartments and restaurants going in all around it because of the train station to Boston.   15 minutes from my house,  5 minutes from a major highway.


But doing the math on the renovation (your second point) scuttled the idea. 

 

Plus a change of getting "forced" out if/when developers/owners of all those newly built nearby apartments and restaurants, etc gang-up on your "dreams".

Just like majority of old (commercial) vehicles, most of the cool old vintage (commercial) buildings will eventually be in the way of "progress" and not worth saving. 

And like their automotive brethren's, few will be saved as novelties and/or tokens.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, alsancle said:

It seems to be a universal problem that the coolest period stuff is sitting in a place you might not want to go.  

 

18 minutes ago, TTR said:

...most of the cool old vintage (commercial) buildings will eventually be in the way of "progress" and not worth saving. 

 

Ah, gentlemen, I invite you to the small stable towns

of the Northeast!  The population hasn't changed, or

has declined, over the last 60 years, and the quiet

tree-lined streets and historic downtowns, the small

or large 100-year-old houses, are still there and well-kept!

I can see postcards of 100-120 years ago, and many

of those streetscapes look the same!

 

Of course, it's because there aren't enough jobs and

not enough growth.  But they are great places to raise a

family or to retire.

 

DSCF1529.JPG

 

Warren house and 59 Cadillac.jpg

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, TTR said:

I live about 55 miles east of (downtown) L.A. and prefer my location for aforementioned reasons, including easier/quicker access to (around the year) driving pleasures.

Fortunately, my daily/work commute is less than 5 minutes.

I've lived in ( grew up in Westchester just north of LAX ), Hermosa Beach, Torrance Beach and Redondo Beach for 55 years, moved to the Central Coast for 10 years before moving to Prescott AZ. I know Ca. pretty well. 55 miles east of down town L.A. has some of the worst air quality in the U.S. When my wife and I drive back to the beach area to see the kids and friends it seems incomprehensible anyone would want to live in that. It seems so bad that when I'm driving through it to get to the beach areas that I should have brought with me my paint respirator from my shop. 

Edited by Pfeil (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

 

Ah, gentlemen, I invite you to the small stable towns

of the Northeast!  The population hasn't changed, or

has declined, over the last 60 years, and the quiet

tree-lined streets and historic downtowns, the small

or large 100-year-old houses, are still there and well-kept!

I can see postcards of 100-120 years ago, and many

of those streetscapes look the same!

 

Of course, it's because there aren't enough jobs and

not enough growth.  But they are great places to raise a

family or to retire.

 

DSCF1529.JPG

 

Warren house and 59 Cadillac.jpg

Thanks for the invite, but unless there’s around the year access to great (spirited) vintage driving (my main “requirement”) I don’t think I’ll be enticed. 

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, TTR said:

Thanks for the invite, but unless there’s around the year access to great (spirited) vintage driving (my main “requirement”) I don’t think I’ll be enticed. 

 

Very hard to pull off 12 month driving in one place (except California).    Mass is good Aprilish through Nov usually.   It has its other problems.   Theoretically,  8-10 weeks somewhere warm would take the edge off.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Pfeil said:

I've lived in ( grew up in Westchester ), Hermosa Beach, Torrance Beach and Redondo Beach for 55 years, moved to the Central Coast for 10 years before moving to Prescott AZ. I know Ca. pretty well. 55 miles east of down town L.A. has some of the worst air quality in the U.S. When my wife and I drive back to the beach area to see the kids and friends it seems incomprehensible anyone would want to live in that. It seems so bad that when I'm driving through it to get to the beach areas that I should have brought with me my paint respirator from my shop. 

Having lived here for past 35 years, air quality has never really bothered* me, but if anything it seems to have improved considerably in past couple decades. 

OTOH, perhaps the fact that I grew up in a household with 2 smokers (mom & grandma) and started myself at the ripe old age of 12 (quit about 20 years ago), still smoke 1-2 cigars a week, been enjoying whisky (straight), red wine and other adult beverage varietals most of my life and been exposed to just about every kind of chemical known to be associated with automotive restoration for past 4 decades has something to do with it and has made me somewhat immune to general air quality ?

 

*Current smoke and falling ash from El Dorado fire (25+ miles away !!!) and a small local incident about a mile from my shop earlier this morning (or similar instances in the past) notwithstanding.

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, alsancle said:

 

Very hard to pull off 12 month driving in one place (except California). 

That’s why I like it here and am willing to forego many things in life others deem more important. 😉

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

At one point I was making more POCI meetings at the So. Cal Chapter than in Florida. Air in Sunnyvale was not that bad (other than the rainstorms in the Blimp hanger at Moffett). But still ran the shower on full hot for a while at night to sleep well. Do think the nearest thing to a perfect climate in the US is at Marina Del Rey/Santa Monica. Unfortunately too many people think the same thing.

 

That said after being gold on three different major airlines for years (one of my needs when moving here was 20 minutes to a world class airport) am now very happy not to go anywhere. 5:30 pm and comfortable in the garage, it is cooling off a bit. Another day in Paradise.

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, TTR said:

Having lived here for past 35 years, air quality has never really bothered* me, but if anything it seems to have improved considerably in past couple decades. 

OTOH, perhaps the fact that I grew up in a household with 2 smokers (mom & grandma) and started myself at the ripe old age of 12 (quit about 20 years ago), still smoke 1-2 cigars a week, been enjoying whisky (straight), red wine and other adult beverage varietals most of my life and been exposed to just about every kind of chemical known to be associated with automotive restoration for past 4 decades has something to do with it and has made me somewhat immune to general air quality ?

 

*Current smoke and falling ash from El Dorado fire (25+ miles away !!!) and a small local incident about a mile from my shop earlier this morning (or similar instances in the past) notwithstanding.

One of my daughters that lives in Long Beach said the smoke from the fires was so bad the fog horns have been going on all day long.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...