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Best Place for an Old Car Guy to Retire?


63RedBrier
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Mike.....I was in Santa Rosa several times two weeks ago. We stayed in Sonoma at the Mission Inn........and went to Petaluma to see the Keller Collection, as well as another collection in Santa Rosa. 
 

 

I use to spend a week a year in the Bay Area........loved the restaurants, all the sights, Sausalito, Marin county, and all the other top things to see and do. Now the city is filled with bums, homeless, trash, it’s dirty, disgusting, and I now refuse to visit.....the only reason I went was the Duesenberg Tour. The people living along side the highway in Santa Rosa was stunningly sad...........sanctuary cities and states are becoming a cesspool. I feel sorry for the hard working people who have to live with all the mess now.......

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Things could be WAY worse than living ACROSS THE STREET from that. Actually, in some ways it looks better kept than the week long line camps I used to see. Just a- hangin'  and a-partyin',  just a-countin' the days down to a big name rock concert way back when I was on a "hip trip". But that is COOL when you are young and able. IT ain't when you AIN'T !!!     Then and now,   -   Cadillac Carl 

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4 hours ago, edinmass said:

I paid 6.49 a gallon in California last week in the boondocks.

 

I also got to see the start and middle portion of the Kincaid fire in Sonoma and Russian River Vally. 
 

The blackouts to prevent fires didn’t work.....they started five fires, burned half the valley, and with no power, getting gas for a 80 year old gas hog was interesting.

 

California is a third world country...........and it’s a shame.

In West Michigan by the Gilmore Car museum I paid $2.09 a gallon for my pickup and then at the same gas station paid $2.69 a gallon for 100% ethanol free gas for my old cars.  I could not imagine paying those prices in California! 

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On 9/18/2019 at 2:36 PM, 63RedBrier said:

In the next six months to three years I plan on retiring...  I'll be in my mid-50's and currently live in the Washington DC area.  I'll be looking for a state that doesn't tax federal retirement.  I'm thinking either Pennsylvania (think Hershey/Carlisle) or North Carolina.  Any suggestions? 

 

Since I will have worked in a office environment for 30+ years I would like to finally work with my hands and turn wrenches, especially on old vehicles!  Any suggestions?  Anyone have a shop where they would need eager help?  Willing to relocate.  Thanks!  Greg 

I was in the same situation 25 years ago.  I sold out in Maryland and moved to the Northern Neck of Virginia (Montross).  It was a good fit....no car club though.  So rounded up all the old car people I could find on the Neck and invited them to my place with their cars.  Wala, the Northern Neck Region was born in 1993 and is still very active today; although I made the mistake of moving to Sebring, Florida in 2005.  I long to go back to Montross, even though they did tax my federal retirement.  However, with the political situation in Virginia now, I don't think I'd  be happy there like before.  That said, we got rid of the Virginia Personal Property Tax on old cars while I was President of the club.  Beware of N.Carolina because they still have a Personal Property Tax.  To me, Central Florida sucks....nothing here but old guys with pony tails and hot rods, except certain locations like Miami and Lake City....maybe a few clubs on the coasts.   No State Income Tax here, though, on any income.  Because of that, were I to sell and move (very expensive when you get 81 and can't do the work yourself), I'd probably move to Lake City area because it is the closest place in Florida to the Northern Neck.

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As much as tax situation sucks in CT, CA and VA are examples of how quickly things change.  We have relatives who spent five years planning escape from CT to VA, pulled trigger this year, and in process of building.  Recent changes are a virtual guarantee things will be changing for the worse there, tax wise.  Be sure you like the place for what it truly is and not just cost of living.

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22 minutes ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

As much as tax situation sucks in CT, CA and VA are examples of how quickly things change.  We have relatives who spent five years planning escape from CT to VA, pulled trigger this year, and in process of building.  Recent changes are a virtual guarantee things will be changing for the worse there, tax wise.  Be sure you like the place for what it truly is and not just cost of living.

You could see the change gradually coming in Ca. in the 70's. But what did it in for Ca. was the 51% majority to pass legislation law that happened a few years back. It used to be a 2/3 majority to pass laws. Now they just do what they want and spend with money they don't have. 

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All I can say is Florida is a big state and can find anything you want somewhere but like Texas or California, distances are large and not much in the middle. Personally I like being near the amenities of a Resort but 35 years on I'd pick a spot a little farther west (e.g. Clermont, Leesburg, Ocala, Gainesville, I-75 corridor) but avoid The Villages. It is best to make a must/want list to start.

 

After having most I use Spectrum for Internet/phone/tv but have a different provider for cell. I also have a backup generator for power when (not if) power is lost. No big just know.

 

ps I see it all the time. Someone moves to Floridas and after two years they move back where they came from. Two years later they are back in Florida this time for good. Best to lease a Condo for a few months and decide what you really want. If the beach, Naples to Cedar Key is nice and Sarasota has the best shopping/restaurants.

 

Gas: today $2.329 for regular with 10% de-icer at moment, no state income tax, sales tax 6.5%, further out you go, the lower the real estate prices but $200k can get something nice. Property taxes mostly $1k-$2k/year (location , location, location)

Living in the county (can see the Orlando city line) two miles from Universal Studios traffic can be very bad at some times and directions (usually just one) I mostly just stay west of I-4 and get things done between 10am and 2pm.

 

The grounds crew:

boids800.jpg

 

 

pps https://flacarshows.com/

 

Edited by padgett (see edit history)
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So does my SL.  I cannot take credit for this though, as I am not a masochist, 100 lb wiry young kid did the work, looks like it was never apart now.

 

Just like in school my pal Nowell is too cheap to fix his, they all fail due to poor ac condensor design on the R107s and its deep in there....

20170530_144857.jpg

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That is what some of the curmudgeons seem to forget, designs that were not very good (DA6) and were superseded a few years later (HR6). Does that make the bad design (but original & hard to find) more appealing to a collector ?

 

And for the truly fanatic, the running change to the '63 Corvette fuel injection. I doubt that anyone remembers what it was.

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16 hours ago, Dynaflash8 said:

That said, we got rid of the Virginia Personal Property Tax on old cars while I was President of the club.

 

Funny, I still pay personal property tax on MY old cars..... When the law changed to stop personal property tax on antique vehicles, the country started charging for county tags on antiques.....😡

 

I would still like the way it was, with personal property tax on vehicles, as I chose to drive old cars with a low tax to be paid, and saved on real estate, sales, etc. When Gilmore got the "No Car Tax" bandwagon going,  my property (real), sales, car registration and other taxes went up way more than I EVER paid in car tax. As I said earlier, it takes X dollars to run the state/county/locality and when you take one revenue stream away, they must replace it with other money. It all comes out of your pocket. Tax retirement income or not, you will still pay your share of taxes!😉

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14 hours ago, Pfeil said:

You could see the change gradually coming in Ca. in the 70's. But what did it in for Ca. was the 51% majority to pass legislation law that happened a few years back. It used to be a 2/3 majority to pass laws.

It's always been 51% to pass a "law."  It now requires 66.67% (2/3) to pass a **TAX** so now we have "fees" which only require a simple majority, instead of "taxes."  And the "fees" aren't deductible but the taxes are....

 

The explosion of population is what's killing California:  We now have 40 million people; in the 1980 census we had 22 million, and when I graduated from HS in 1960, we were just breaking 9 million.  So in my adult lifetime, I've seen a 450% increase in population.  1980 was about the last good time to live in CA.

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6 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

 

Funny, I still pay personal property tax on MY old cars..... When the law changed to stop personal property tax on antique vehicles, the country started charging for county tags on antiques.....😡

 

I would still like the way it was, with personal property tax on vehicles, as I chose to drive old cars with a low tax to be paid, and saved on real estate, sales, etc. When Gilmore got the "No Car Tax" bandwagon going,  my property (real), sales, car registration and other taxes went up way more than I EVER paid in car tax. As I said earlier, it takes X dollars to run the state/county/locality and when you take one revenue stream away, they must replace it with other money. It all comes out of your pocket. Tax retirement income or not, you will still pay your share of taxes!😉

 

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6 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

 

Funny, I still pay personal property tax on MY old cars..... When the law changed to stop personal property tax on antique vehicles, the country started charging for county tags on antiques.....😡

 

I would still like the way it was, with personal property tax on vehicles, as I chose to drive old cars with a low tax to be paid, and saved on real estate, sales, etc. When Gilmore got the "No Car Tax" bandwagon going,  my property (real), sales, car registration and other taxes went up way more than I EVER paid in car tax. As I said earlier, it takes X dollars to run the state/county/locality and when you take one revenue stream away, they must replace it with other money. It all comes out of your pocket. Tax retirement income or not, you will still pay your share of taxes!😉

I don't get that.  After the change, I never paid a dime of personal property tax.  Understand, you have to be running antique auto tags.  Registered antique cars come under "other stuff" like household goods in Virginia, which haven't been taxed since (I think) the 1950s.  Know the law.  Before we got it changed Richmond County was changing Personal Property tax based on the NADA Old Car Value Book.  One club member was changed something like $2,000 for a Corvette.  The new law was signed by Gov. Allen.  I'm sure it hasn't been changed    The car tax does not apply to antique cars (so registered).  As fir County tax, Westmoreland Co. tried to charge the $5 a year for that, and we got that removed because under another law based on state tag costs, it was more than the state tag.  Since then the antique tag law has changed.  I think that is now $50 one-time fee instead of $1 a y ear.  I've been gone from Virginia, full time, since 2005, but I am still in the NNR and I've seen no complaints about Personal Property Tax in their newsletter.  Tom Cox worked with me and others back in the 1990s on the Personal Property Tax law.  He still lives in Virginia.  As him if anything has changed since that time.

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)
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On 9/18/2019 at 4:17 PM, Harold said:

How is the cloudiness/rain situation?  My son lives in Seattle and we're probably moving near there in a year or two.  The gloominess is getting me worried.

MUCH milder that Seattle. Less rain, less cold, less snow. Cloudless skies the majority of the time.

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I have found this thread really interesting, but not surprising. It has kind of reinforced my feeling, that from the East Coast perspective, that the states of North Carolina and Florida, are going to be bursting at the seams, when all the Baby Boomers move there. The second take is that people seem to be more concerned about money, then they are about overall quality of life. The third take is that most people here have an accepted reality that hot, humid, hellish, weather is the only reality for the summer months. Forth take is that most people dread cold snowy winters, and are willing to exchange them for hot humid summers.

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I'll jump in here with Keiser on the Phoenix/Medford area, but I would not characterize it as milder then the weather in Seattle. Its hotter in the summer (often very hot and dry!) and it is colder in the winter. Believe me you wouldn't have to give up the sun if you were to move to Medford. Seattle and Medford are like comparing apples and oranges. I've always thought the area would be good for sun worshipers or someone who hates cloudy weather. I'll try to compare it to Asheville, both are in the mountains (Phoenix/Medford in the foothills) P/M is smaller the Asheville, it's much much milder without the oppressive humidity, winters are maybe about the same. Klamith Falls might be another good destination, or any of the other high desert towns and cities in Washington and Oregon, would satisfy the sun worshiper among the group. 

 

Not trying to convince anyone, just providing some perspective. As a matter of fact I don't know why John would want people to move to his little town. i understand why he likes it, and why it should be included for consideration. It's a little too hot in the summer, cold in the winter and no salt water around, to suite me, but that's why I live where I do, and he lives where he lives.

Bill

Edited by Buffalowed Bill (see edit history)
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In 1957 the population of Florida was 4,000,000. 1980, 10,000,000. Now it is 23,000,000. Since 1900 the rate of increase per year has dropped from 2.6% to 1.5%. Except for along the coasts and O'town, Florida is very sparsely populated (lotsa swamps) . The state has about 1/2 person per acre.

 

The glorious time of the year is upon us (some complained this morning that it got down in to the 50s but was 70 by church time). Does help to be bilingual (but TexMex works).

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33 minutes ago, keiser31 said:

Bill is pretty much right. I was trying to build it up because I am lonely and need more car guys to move here and hang out with me. I guess I was being selfish.

The Medford area has a great car culture. I loved the sun and didn’t mind the cold in the winter. The smoke from the fires of 2018 was the only thing I didn’t like. It’s a great area otherwise. 

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We moved from the Chicago suburbs 20 years ago to Lexington KY to mainly get away from taxes. Unless you are horse people it’s not an over welcoming community. We are horse people so it was ok. Weather is good car culture not so great but ok. The taxes were less than a third of Illinois. 

Six months ago we moved to Aiken S C the cost of housing is great, taxes again a third of KY, weather is very good. Warm but not overly hot. Akin is in a higher area and we have a breeze most evenings. Car culture is ok especially for A’s and model T’s. 2 hours from ocean, two and a half hours from Atlanta, golf courses everywhere. It’s a transplant city for many retirees. Easy to meet people with similar backgrounds. Politics can be a problem but that is true in most areas depending on your point of view. 

If you are looking for a beautiful livable area in the south you should check it out. 

Have fun 

Dave S 

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Padgatt,

 

Not trying to be a smart ass, but my response was a look into the future, call it a reality check, if you will. There are 76 million Baby Boomers poised to retire. Most the country's population live on the East Coast. Where are the retirees who don't like the snow going when they retire. I think I made it clear where I thought they were headed. The future is now, do you have another take on it?

Bill

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1 hour ago, Buffalowed Bill said:

There are 76 million Baby Boomers poised to retire.

Hi Bill,

 

I realize you were not asking me, but I do think that many will stay close to family, and finances will dictate where people can afford to move to. Only a percentage of the population can afford to move or is willing to be away from family. I don’t see a huge exodus from any particular part of the country as imminent. Our Reverse Mortgage applications are brisk all over the country. These are people 62+ who intend to stay in their homes over the long haul. (Due to closing costs, it doesn’t make financial sense to do one and plan to move within a few years).

Supply and demand will determine prices. Many will stay put, some will move to better climates or out of the country, such as Mexico, where it’s cheaper to live, some will snowbird, etc. Quite a few even full time in their Rv’s as long as they can. 

Edited by victorialynn2 (see edit history)
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24 minutes ago, victorialynn2 said:

Hi Bill,

 

. I don’t see a huge exodus from any particular part of the country as imminent. Our Reverse Mortgage applications are brisk all over the country. These are people 62+ who intend to stay in their homes over the long haul. (Due to closing costs, it doesn’t make financial sense to do one and plan to move within a few years).

 

 

You don't???

691,145 Californians left last year

 

 

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13 minutes ago, Pfeil said:

 

You don't???

691,145 Californians left last year

 

 

Lots of people are moving from California and moving to Oregon, Texas, New Mexico, etc., not necessarily retirees. I haven’t seen any stats specific to retirees or people who will be retiring in the next few years, have you? I was just saying the Reverse Mortgage business which is specific to that demographic is healthy all over the country. 

 

Here is some interesting info and it says less than 2% of retirees move. (https://www.investopedia.com/articles/retirement/020117/most-popular-states-retire-us.asp

“The Bottom Line 

While these studies point to where retirees may be likely to move, it is worth noting that most people end up staying in place when they retire. Only 1.6% of retirees between the ages of 55 and 65 moved across state lines, according to an analysis of 2010 U.S. Census Bureau data by Richard W. Johnson, director of the Urban Institute’s Program on Retirement Policy. The vast majority of retirees either stayed in their existing homes or made in-state moves.”

Edited by victorialynn2 (see edit history)
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I spent a week in Klamath Falls in the middle of winter, in a motel, while doing surveying work. Nice place to visit, but don't think I'd want to live there. I felt out of place. It was cold but dry, there were people with snow tires even though no snow. Went to Rooster's steakhouse once, great steak, great value, and no sales tax!

 

 

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45 minutes ago, victorialynn2 said:

Lots of people are moving from California and moving to Oregon, Texas, New Mexico, etc., not necessarily retirees. I haven’t seen any stats specific to retirees or people who will be retiring in the next few years, have you? I was just saying the Reverse Mortgage business which is specific to that demographic is healthy all over the country. 

 

Here is some interesting info and it says less than 2% of retirees move. (https://www.investopedia.com/articles/retirement/020117/most-popular-states-retire-us.asp

“The Bottom Line 

While these studies point to where retirees may be likely to move, it is worth noting that most people end up staying in place when they retire. Only 1.6% of retirees between the ages of 55 and 65 moved across state lines, according to an analysis of 2010 U.S. Census Bureau data by Richard W. Johnson, director of the Urban Institute’s Program on Retirement Policy. The vast majority of retirees either stayed in their existing homes or made in-state moves.”

 

 

That census is old and a lot has changed in Ca.

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I feel like I'm under siege where I live. Traffic is horrendous, way too many cars speeding on rural roads, cost of living too high, restaurants that I liked have closed, and replaced with very expensive ones that cater to the wealthy.

 

https://www.williswinebar.com/menu

Dinner - Seasonal & Evolutive Carte

Entrées

Minestrone Italian tradition with basilicas & parmesan €9

Prawns on a skewer with citrus fruit and green salsa  €12 

Bruschetta with grilled vegatables, herb vinaigrette & condiments €11.50

Home-made smoked haddock tartar, avocado guacamole €12

Quail breast escabeche, rocket salad 11€50

Open ravioli with wild mushrooms & candied leeks €13  


Plats

Marmite of fish fillets in Bouillabaisse €21

Fregola sarda risotto with chanterelles & shiitake €18

Grilled duck breast with candied apples & grapes €19.50

Pièce charolaise 'label rouge', cresson froissé, puree tradition €20

Farm guinea fowl of Challans with wild mushrooms €19

Roasted Bourbonnais lamb with sweet spices & winter fruits €22.50


Desserts

Pippin like an apple baked in salted butter €8

My little moka emotion, warm ganache, langue de chat €7.50

Dark chocolate terrine – a Willi’s original €10

Veloni, an Italian coffee dessert €8

Crunchy praline, almonds, caramelised hazelnuts €8

Seasonal fruit and lemon tart €9

 
Edited by mike6024 (see edit history)
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OTOH I live four miles from Orlando's Restaurant Row (prefer Season's 52 but Ruth's Chris or Chatams are not bad, Morton's is better in Chi, Ocean's Prime has the best Patagonian Toothfish, only know one place for a decent chateaubriand. ) and just local roads to get there. Good happy Hours at most  (meetup groups abound). Prices here are in dollars though.

 

ps "smoked haddock tartar," that is wrong on so many levels...

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Opps, my bad I didn't realize they had a location in France. Here is the one that is local here in N. Calif.

 

https://www.allmenus.com/ca/santa-rosa/267537-willis-wine-bar/menu/

 

 

  • International Small Plates - Earth
     
    • Tracey's Almonds or Marinated Olives$4.50

       

    • Warm Fall Herb Skillet Bread$6.00

      Gruyere, sea salt, green olive tapenade

    • Tarte Flambee Flatbread$12.00

      Scallions, smoked bacon, creme fraiche

    • Tomato Soup Shooters$9.00

      Truffled pimenta grilled cheese.

    • Local Crimini Mushroom Salad$9.00

      Extra old parmigiano

    • Smashed Avocado Bruschetta$10.50

      Radish lemon oil, shaved ricotta salata.

    • Goat Cheese Gnocchi$12.00

      Exotic mushrooms, truffle fonduta

    • Arugula & Endive Salad$9.00

      Avocado, manchego cheese, toasted almonds, meyer lemon-truffle vinaigrette

    • Wok Charred Cauliflower & Shishito Pepper$11.00

       

    • Warm Spinach Salad$10.00

      Goat cheese, dates, cracked almonds, pancetta vinaigrette

    • Goat Cheese Fritters$7.00

      Served with blistered cherry tomatoes, smoked paprika & lavender honey

    • Roasted Brussels Sprouts$10.00

      Served with andouille sausage, apples, point reyes blue cheese & sage brown butter

    • Smoked Goat's Milk Cheddar Mac & Cheese$9.00

      Tomato confit, melted leeks

    • Tunisian Roasted Local Carrots$9.50

      Served with pine nuts, olives & mint

    • Willi's Truffled French Fries with Truffle Aioli$9.00

       

  • International Small Plates - Turf
     
    • Foie Gras Poppers Backyard$15.00

      Apple & calvados chutney, vanilla bean fleur de sel

    • Lamb Tartare$13.00

      Served with vadouvan aioli, preserved lemon, mint, pinenuts & harissa olive oil

    • Pork Belly Pot Stickers$11.00

      Served with five spice & shiitake mushrooms.

    • Jones Farm Rabbit Rillettes$10.50

      Sweet & sour figs, tonka bean salt

    • Roasted Bone Marrow$13.00

      Served with toasted brioche, & red onion marmalade.

    • Liberty Farms Pulled Duck BBQ, White Cheddar Polenta$11.00

       

    • Organic Brick Chicken$12.00

      Tzatziki sauce, fried onion salad

    • Mu Shu Bacon Chive & Shiso Crepes, Hoisin BBQ Sauce$11.00

       

    • Crispy Pork Riblets$12.50

      Pomegranate BBQ, thai basil, pinenuts

    • Moroccan Style Lamb Chops$15.00

      Preserved lemon couscous, toasted almonds & arugula

    • Filet Mignon Sliders$16.00

      Creamed spinach, whole grain mustard bearnaise

  • Cheese
    Served with white truffle honey, wine crackers & walnut toast.
    • Delice De La Vallee Triple Cream$15.00+

      Luscious triple cream cow & goat's milk cheese. Mild, sweet & creamy.

    • Formaggio La Tur, Caseificio Dell'alta Langa$15.00+

      Triple cream equal parts cow, goat, sheep aged ten days. Flaky center becoming more creamy around the edges when ripe. Slightly tangy with a touch of white mushroom & mellow nuttiness

    • Cabot Clothbound Cheddar$15.00+

      Cow's milk cheddar that is sharp, salty & creamy with a hint of beeswax.

    • Pleasant Ridge Reserve$15.00+

      Grass-fed cow's milk aged 10-12 months.Rich & hearty. Caramel & roasted hazelnut with a subtle grassy & olive-like tartness.

    • Ewenique, Central Coast Creamery$15.00+

      Sheep's milk, semi soft. brimming with sweet & savory earthy aromas & flavors. bermuda triangle, cypress grove chevre, Arcata, ca soft ripened goat's milk cheese with black vegetable ash. tart & tangy with intense pepper notes.

    • Ellie's Vintage Two Year Reserve Blue, Shaft's Cheese$15.00+

      Cow's milk. The additional aging creates a unique and rare cheese that is sweet, creamy & lush.

  • Charcuterie
     
    • La Quercia Proscuitto Americano$15.00+

      Dry cured pork proscuitto. Earthy, rich, nutty & sweet.

    • La Quercia Coppa Americana$15.00+

      Made from pork shoulder with sea salt pimenton de la vera & cocoa. Dry aged for three to six months.

    • Fabrique Delices Duck Prosciutto$15.00+

      Cured & dried in the traditional Italian fashion. slightly sweet, each duck breast is cured whole.

    • Creminelli Bresaola$15.00+

      Dry cured bovine eye of round. Lean & tender, sea salt & cracked red pepper.

    • La Quercia Borsellino Salami$15.00+

      Coursely ground, finely bound, mild & sweet with a touch of fennel.

    • Creminelli Tartufo$15.00+

      A Felino style salami with the addition of Italian summer black truffles, earthy & salty.

    • Fermin Chorizo Iberico$15.00+

      A traditional specialty made from the famous acorn fed pata negra & smoked paprika. Richly marbled, complex & meaty.

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