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Peter J.Heizmann

Murphy's Law is amazing to say the least

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The message from this story is that once cash changes hands, only the buyer touches the car.

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 I wonder if the new buyer was able to drive a T?

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43 minutes ago, TerryB said:

 I wonder if the new buyer was able to drive a T?

  When I sold our 1915 Model T Touring, the buyer asked if I could drive it to his house.  I said sure and I'll give you a Model T Driving Lesson too.

  He said no he just wanted to get it home.  I did make him ride with me in the Model T.  It's a strange world  but he's not alone.  When we sold our

  1934 Ford Phaeton the buyer had a Model T in his garage and he too refused a driivng lesson in his Model T, which he had never driven.

   See my tag line below.

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Bizarre accident with a Model T Ford?  The T driver was texting??

 

I gave a driving lesson in a Model T long bed wood C-cab with a slippery smooth wood seat. NEITHER of us wet our pants!

 

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I made the guy I bought my Dodge from drive it on my trailer. But I learned as soon as I got it home. Still mastering the craft. It’s articles like this that keep me extra aware. Also I don’t go into town. 

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This sad story brings up another topic: I don't know what time of day the accident happened, but I eventually adopted the policy to never drive my old/antique cars during rush hours, morning or evening. My old cars are much more modern than a Model T, but they still don't have the stopping or cornering that my 2006 mini-van or 2010 Toyota have. My daughter actually got in a minor/minimal damage accident the other day with the Toyota. Had it or the other vehicle not had modern brakes or the ability to swerve and maintain stability, the accident would've been much worse. And the accident happened while she was driving to high school...i.e., morning rush hour.

 

When I used to drive my old cars during rush hour, I was always tense and muttering at other drivers: "....Don't do it...don't do it...." That's not fun, and I own old cars for fun.

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10 minutes ago, JamesR said:

When I used to drive my old cars during rush hour, I was always tense and muttering at other drivers: "....Don't do it...don't do it...." That's not fun, and I own old cars for fun.

 

I still find myself muttering those words.

 

Usually followed by a “bloody idiot”

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I am glad nobody was seriously hurt. But, hey! Its a model T!

 

I am sure the frame is bent. Left front fender may or may not be worth repairing. Rear end will need some work. Front axle and spring. Maybe re-wood one wheel.

Maybe a new radiator, about $700. Four to five hundred dollars more should buy most of the T parts needed, about two months of spare time? And the T would be just as good as before. Maybe even better.

 

I have known several "wrecked" model Ts being repaired. They are so easy to work on. Post brass parts are readily available, and not expensive. I have seen some really wasted wrecks made better than new by owners that didn't want the car destroyed on their watch. This one would be a piece of cake!

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