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Sorry to interrupt but I need some help to ID a tool


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Thanks!  Honestly it's for my girlfriend's son and yeah he's starting Auto tech. I've worked on cars for 40 years and was a crew member / crew chief on a dirt track car for 15 years. Many years ago I saw one of these but never knew what it was. I really appreciate the help everyone!   😁

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Do "auto techs" even rebuild engines anymore? I'd be amazed if a shop didn't just slap in a commercial rebuilt long block. The labor costs of rebuilding a motor in the shop would drive costs through the roof. And frankly, with all the motors I've rebuilt, I've never had cause to clean the piston ring grooves. I just buy new (forged) pistons. I'm sure there are less popular engines where one is forced to reuse pistons, but I'm amazed this is covered in a mainstream auto tech course. Heck, can you even get pistons knurled anymore?

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1 hour ago, joe_padavano said:

Do "auto techs" even rebuild engines anymore? I'd be amazed if a shop didn't just slap in a commercial rebuilt long block. The labor costs of rebuilding a motor in the shop would drive costs through the roof. And frankly, with all the motors I've rebuilt, I've never had cause to clean the piston ring grooves. I just buy new (forged) pistons. I'm sure there are less popular engines where one is forced to reuse pistons, but I'm amazed this is covered in a mainstream auto tech course. Heck, can you even get pistons knurled anymore?

One of our club members is currently taking an auto mech course at a local community college.  I had a look through his text book and wow, what fantastic information in it!  I gotta get a copy somehow.   It is basic of course but the trouble shooting info and diagnostic details are amazing. 

 

I think SLM is just being resourceful.  

Terry

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This is a first year class at a tech highschool and I honestly don't know what they will be covering and / or doing. I've never cleaned a ring groove either. The pic is from a worksheet where they had to identify the tool. I didn't have a clue what that was. I'm interested in how far into things they will be going myself. 

 

 

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Friend of mine made his living selling shop equipment to dealerships. He told me dealerships preferred hiring computer types over classically trained mechanics because it was easier to teach a computer nerd to change parts than it was to teach a mechanic to operate computers. 

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15 minutes ago, Restorer32 said:

Friend of mine made his living selling shop equipment to dealerships. He told me dealerships preferred hiring computer types over classically trained mechanics because it was easier to teach a computer nerd to change parts than it was to teach a mechanic to operate computers. 

 

 I concur. A good friend of mine is a top mechanic and over the years he has seen diagnostics become very computer friendly where the computer tells the tech what is going on and what to replace. However when things don't go "right" the computer guys head his way...

 Me? i'm just a one trick pony with 4 driving Reattas. I know in most cases it is just the end component that failed and my job is to just figure out the which end component. I have many extra parts in my parts bin and they are all tested good as when I get a part I install it and keep the just taken off part as a back up. Never failed me yet. 

Edited by DAVES89 (see edit history)
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25 minutes ago, Restorer32 said:

Friend of mine made his living selling shop equipment to dealerships. He told me dealerships preferred hiring computer types over classically trained mechanics because it was easier to teach a computer nerd to change parts than it was to teach a mechanic to operate computers. 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, SLM said:

This is a first year class at a tech highschool and I honestly don't know what they will be covering and / or doing. I've never cleaned a ring groove either. The pic is from a worksheet where they had to identify the tool. I didn't have a clue what that was. I'm interested in how far into things they will be going myself. 

 

 

 

Shouldn't the answer have been in the textbook or class materials? Just sayin...

 

Piston-Ring-Groove-Cleaner-Metric-Standa5251_Left.jpg

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10 hours ago, joe_padavano said:

 

Shouldn't the answer have been in the textbook or class materials? Just sayin...

 

 

Honestly I'm not sure what the class materials are yet.  I haven't seen them but I'm interested.  They were told to use the Snap-On website for reference material.  Not having any idea what it was didn't give much idea on where to start, LOL!  To be honest, I sent the picture to Snap-On to see what it was and they didn't know from the picture.   

10 hours ago, 46 woodie said:

I haven't used one in probably 50 years so if you want one for your shop class, PM me and I will send you mine, (if I can find it).

Thanks, I appreciate the offer.  If something comes up, I'll send you a message.

9 hours ago, Bloo said:

A broken piece of old piston ring will do in a pinch.

Now that I've heard of! 😀

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Spent many years in information security and always believed it belonged with guns and dogs, was a queation of authority, Also found it easier to teach a police (wo)man computers than a computer person security. Biggest hurdle was "chain of custody".

 

Can see the same thing happening in auto shop, it is easier to use Torque Pro on a phone and OBD-II has been around in the US since 1996 models.

 

BTW what Dave didn't mention is that a Reatta has a built in scan tool.

diagnostics.jpg

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I am about ready to pull the trigger on a Snap On Solus OBD2 scan tool.

 

Computers have been a part of my daily work tools since November 1974 and I consider it a tool for a mechanic rather than the other way around. The 2003 BMW has two communication buses that talk to about 150 microprocessors.

 

Currently I am studying OBD2 at the sensor level. Last night it hit me. whoa! This is all the stuff you read on an oscilloscope with an interface like windows. I plan to do this another 30 years. I have the key.

 

To the topic, I have never cleaned a ring lands.

Bernie

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15 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

The 2003 BMW has two communication buses that talk to about 150 microprocessors.

 

And that right there is the fundamental problem. In my day job, I build and fly launch vehicles to put satellites in orbit. Our rockets don't need anywhere near 150 microprocessors - more like 15-20. We also have an extremely rigorous verification and validation process for software and firmware used by these systems, and once that testing is complete, the configuration of the software is locked down. Needless to say, there is no such thing as "over the air" updates.

 

Most of these automotive microprocessors are bandaids for poor design. Do windows in the doors REALLY need to roll down an inch when you close the door and then roll back up to seal the weatherstrip? GM built hardtops for half a century that didn't need this "feature". Of course, it isn't just automotive design - it's pervasive throughout all consumer products. Does your washing machine or refrigerator REALLY need to be connected to the interwebs? Does your coffee maker REALLY need a microprocessor to boil water?

Edited by joe_padavano (see edit history)
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26 minutes ago, joe_padavano said:

build and fly launch vehicles to put satellites in orbit

 

But I brought the BMW home every time I used it.

 

I love the car and the technology drew me to it. There is a lot. My plan is to keep it 10 years and maintain it myself. To quote one famous observer "Fascinating".

 

One of the first service jobs to the car require jacking one corner. Before jacking I searched everywhere to find a leveling shut off switch. Remember those air ride GM cars from 1958 to 1960 lying on their bellies in the used car row? Or the 1990's Lincolns sitting by a shop with deflated air bags. Those were electro-mechanical. Mine has rear air suspension and front electro-magnetic plus motors on the sway bar ends to control yaw. I had no intention of messing that up.

 

Studied the manuals I found online, to enable the height control the car had to measure a 2-3 centimeter jounce in the suspension to be sure the car was moving. No action on my part, just jack it up. Little known to buyers I am sure, but a great feature to the self service owner. Probably made me feel akin to the 1950 used Duesenberg purchaser telling his friends about the dial indicator he bought to adjust the valves.

 

I could go on but people get bored and fall asleep. And I have my own thoughts on orbital traffic management.

tumblr_m35foiJI6a1qzz0iho1_1280.thumb.jpg.076e55fdc830ebe1fafd5f5eef58c833.jpg

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