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I really must be growing old, today I am starting to feel the heat, not that it is any hotter than any other Spring day in Melbourne. Normally gas welding makes very little difference.  With both the front and rear door of my "Garage/workshop" open I get a good flow of ventilation. 

Back to work, enough of this slacking off!

 

Bj

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Two days later..........  As if to proove that I am living in Melbourne, (Australia). The city with the unique claim of having "Four Seasons in the One Day". Today the temperature has fallen by about 20 degrees (Centigrade) and it has been raining for the last two hours. Another Spring day in Melbourne! AND it is only 9.45 am.

 

Bj.

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Thank you Ben, your support is always appreciated.

Changing the subject ever so slightly, and adding to my comments regarding Melbournes weather, for all of the people who may never get to visit our country, Melbourne is situated in the south eastern corner of mainland Australia, (Southern Hemisphere). The first two photographs are looking from my "garage front door" the third is looking out through my "dog kennel" (it is not large enough to be classified as a "den or a study") window. This included a door leading into the garden at the side of the house. Our "land" is a normal (Melbourne) suburban lot. Just slightly less that a quarter of an acre. We have lived in the same house for the last 50 years.(approx) We built (had built) our house in a then new "subdivision". Originally East Doncaster was Apple, Pear and Lemon orchards, settled in the 1860s by mainly German immigrants.

We planted as seedlings the entire garden of mainly Australian "Native" plants, including the now nature Eucalyptus trees. Eucalyptus (Gum) trees are "ever-green" but do drop leaves throughout the year. These leaves go to form a "Mulch" which also includes "chipped" fallen branches, prunings etc, to create what I refer to as "Forest litter", left to slowly rot adding vegetable matter to the soil. There is no "lawn" to mow apart from a small area of "Grass" at the rear of the house. There is an "under-story" of small flowering (native) plants and shrubs.

Surprising as it may seem, I do have other interests apart from "Old Cars".

 

Bj.

 

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DSCN6584.thumb.jpg.d472b319917a0df62c6155ef8a9e31ba.jpg

 

 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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I have been without power from last Saturday to yesterday, Thursday afternoon, no water either since i have a well. No internet or phone. it was an intentional blackout due to high winds and fire danger, yet we had a powerline sparked fire anyway. I was in a mandatory evacuation area, but stayed put anyway.

 

Glad to hear you're making good progress Bernie!

 

 

Fire2.jpg

Fire.jpg

Fire3.jpg

Edited by mike6024 (see edit history)

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Mike, I'm thinking about you and your buddies out there... not good. 

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Hello Mike

Your problems with wild fires or as we call them "Bush Fires" are well known to us, we have on several occasions sent Australian Fire-fighters to the USA to assist. This year here "Down Under" our "Fire Season" has started early, this has been brought about by one of the worst droughts our Farm Community has experienced in the last 100 years. 

Virtually all our natural forests are Eucalyptus Trees, in hot weather these release their natural oils as a highly imflammable gas that once ignighted, the intense fire races across the tree tops. It seems that no amount of "Water Bombing or Air-drops of Fire Retardent can control these fires. 

We are lucky that we live in suburban Melbourne our nearest "forest" is fifty to 100 kilometres away. It is still possible to find charred pieces of bark in our neighbourhood carried by the wind. In the "Bush" it is these still burning "embers" that can be blown by the wind several miles to start a secondary "Spot Fire". As with your fires much of the areas being burnt are in inaccessible mountain country making any attempt to bring the fire "under control" extremely difficult.

Please understand, I am not attempting to denigrate or down-play your problems which are horrific but explain, that we from the other side of the world understand and sympathise with you.

 

Bernie j.

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Hi Mike, Thinking of you guys. bushfires are formidable.....The last really bad one we had they say the fire was moving at 100mph...people just couldn't get out fast enough !

 

Your right Bernie. Our weather is something to experience. Two days of 34 degrees Celsius......24 hours of rain and the heater is back on. Tee shirt this morning again but forecast for rain and possible storm. Ahhh Melbourne's weather !!! 

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Hello Al

Unfortunately not a great amount this week. I made the classic mistake of picking up my "angle grinder" to whiz off a little "dag" at the end of a piece of steel, WITHOUT first putting on my safety glasses.

After a sleepless night followed by an early morning visit to the Emergency Department of the Melbourne EYE &  Ear Hospital, I have been on light duties all this week. My left eye is slowly comming good but seeing with only my right eye has slowed me down. I should be back out in the garage next week. By then I will be another year older but probably not much wiser. 

 

Bernie j

DoB 9/11/1936.

 

Dag.   Australian slang; originally referring to a "lock of wool" mattered with dung hanging from the hindquarters of a sheep.

(Reader's Digest "Word Power" Dictionary)

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Dang, Bernie!  Be careful. For the record, most if not all of us have done the same.  Luckly, most came through ok.   

 

 Is your birth date  d,m,y or m,d,y?

 

Ben

 

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Bernie,

As mentioned above, I also have been there-done that!  Slit lamp, die in the eye, scrape and pick a hot spark out.  Funny thing, it made my nose run for a couple of days getting the die out! Modern medicine is sure a nice thing.  It wouldn't surprise me if we both could have lost our vision permanently and maybe the whole eye of we had lived a hundred years ago.  Is your wire welder a flux core type or do you use gas?  Does your good wife help you with getting things straight and square? (an extra set of eyes)? 

Al

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Hello Ben

My Birthday is today Nov 9th I turn 83. i.e. I am a 1936 model. I am amazed that I have lasted this long following my adventure with Cancer 17 or 18 years ago. It just goes to prove that saying - Only the good die young!

 

Hi Al

I still use my antique Oxy-Acetylene set for all my heating and welding and a little bronze. I do also have an equally ancient Arc (electric) welder but rarely use it. I need to buy some more "rods". Normally I would only use it for heavy gauge (chassis etc) welding. I did a short Hobby-welding course about 100 years ago, but I have had a lot of practice since then.

I attribute my old age to good living including a glass of red wine every night before eating, one or two more on special occasion. I try to keep my weight to approximately the same as when I went into "National Service" (Army for three months) when I was 18 yo. I am currently a pound or two over that. I still do have a 34inch waist and still wear the same size pants. Quite possibly the same pants.  I have a very good cook/house keeper.  The same one for well over 50 years! Our life is never boring.  AND I always must have a "project car" to keep me occupied. When finished these project cars are sold to help finance the next one!

 

Bernie j.

 

 

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Happy Birthday, Bernie!  We all wish you a very happy day, a healthy and productive year, and we express our great appreciation of your automotive adventures and your excellent documentation of them for our benefit!

 

One of your largely silent but faithful fans,

 

George

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Happy Birthday 🎂🎂🎂🎂🎉 Bernie.  Have a great day and do something fun!

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Bernie happy 30th birthday,will be watching the progress for years to come,hope the eye is better,   Dave

 

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Thank you all for the good wishes, my eye is improving in leaps and bounds. I trust that it will continue to give me some good service for a few more years. We have only had the one visit to the USA for the AACA 75th Anniversary at Louisville Kentucky where we enjoyed meeting many of you then. The long aeroplane trip from Sydney to LA is a little to much to think about another now. Especially as there is still another long flight from the West to the East Coast.  But the Forum is a good alternative.

The Singer project becomes more interesting as I endeavour to dig out more of its mysterious history. That it has apparently done so few miles in its long life needs some more investigation. It is just a shame that it had seems to have spent so many of those years standing out under a pine tree. Meanwhile I am still impatiently waiting for the Lagonda Rapier to finally come home from England. Hopefully before the end of this month.  With all this happening I don't have time to grow old!

 

Bj

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Well, I seem to be a late-comer to this thread. Began reading the first half last night, and the second half tonight.

So, a few comments. I may be late, so first, Happy Birthday! Even if it is a day late.

Second. Please be careful with those two orbs in your face! For most of his adult life, my dad had only one functioning eye. Yes, he adapted very well and did everything just fine with only one eye, Being just a little older than he was (by about fifty years!) when he lost his right eye, it would be much more difficult for you adapting to no depth perception. As a side note, if one must lose an eye, at least he got a great story to tell about how he lost it. It was a dynamite accident!

 

A few days ago, you lamented that no one had responded to your comment about understanding what you are doing? I do wish I had begun reading a few days sooner. I have resurrected a few '20s era speedsters from a small amount of surviving original bits and pieces. Trying to recreate the original look and feel of the era using original type materials and techniques and bring back these pieces of history to be driven and enjoyed is quite satisfying.

 

I look forward to following your upcoming progress!

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  Well, HAPPY BIRTHDAY, old feller!   Yeah, I can call you "old". One of few.  You have me beat by a couple months.

    As others are saying, You do good work. I look forward to hearing from you each morning. Always disappointed when there is nothing .from you. SO, don't disappoint!.

 

  Ben

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Hello Wayne et al.

Welcome to my ramblings, as you have probably guessed "old cars" play a major part in my live. Please note also that I have used the "present tense".

Normally I am reasonably careful but it is very easy to think "I will just do that" and then reap the consequences.

Age really does not make you any wiser, if anything the opposite.

You may like to look at my "other"  thread under "British Cars"..... Lagonda Rapier.  The two tend to be intertwined. You may have also realised that I live in Australia which just goes to proove what a small world we live in.

Bernie j.

 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Now something more about the 1935 Singer 11hp.

I have just removed the starter in order to clean it and give it a fresh coat of paint. As with virtually everything I have touched on this car, I have been amazed that the starter pinion shows no sign of wear and the starter itself appears never to have had the "brush cover" removed. Tomorrow I will check the brushes for wear and try to take some photographs. Meanwhile all this seems to confirm that the car has done virtually little or no miles from new. This despite all those disastrous years out in the open with only the branches of a Pine tree for shelter.

Now I cannot wait to remove the cylinder head and oil "sump" to check the size and condition of the cylinder bores and the condition of the big-end bearings.  

Can the 6,634 miles shown on the mileage (speedo) be correct? After 80 years????

 

Bernie j.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Happy Belated Birthday Bernie!  Sorry I was on one of those long flights....east coast to west.  But is is Nov. 9th here.....so celebrate again for us!!

 

Frank

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Thank you Frank

I really do appreciate the kind thoughts of all  those people who inhabit the AACA Forum. I do not envy you one bit doing one of those seemingly endless flights. They are the one big obstacle to travel for us these days. 

I think that it is amazing, just how small the world has become. 

 

Bernie j.

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On 11/2/2019 at 10:47 PM, oldcar said:

Hello Mike

Your problems with wild fires or as we call them "Bush Fires" are well known to us, we have on several occasions sent Australian Fire-fighters to the USA to assist. This year here "Down Under" our "Fire Season" has started early, this has been brought about by one of the worst droughts our Farm Community has experienced in the last 100 years. 

Virtually all our natural forests are Eucalyptus Trees, in hot weather these release their natural oils as a highly imflammable gas that once ignighted, the intense fire races across the tree tops. It seems that no amount of "Water Bombing or Air-drops of Fire Retardent can control these fires. 

We are lucky that we live in suburban Melbourne our nearest "forest" is fifty to 100 kilometres away. It is still possible to find charred pieces of bark in our neighbourhood carried by the wind. In the "Bush" it is these still burning "embers" that can be blown by the wind several miles to start a secondary "Spot Fire". As with your fires much of the areas being burnt are in inaccessible mountain country making any attempt to bring the fire "under control" extremely difficult.

Please understand, I am not attempting to denigrate or down-play your problems which are horrific but explain, that we from the other side of the world understand and sympathise with you.

 

Bernie j.

I’m of Portuguese decent and last year traveled overseas to my great grandfathers house on Madeira Island. Madeira’s latitude is about the same as Morocco and the island has very even temperatures allowing it to grow any species of vegetation that grows in the world. While it is a steep sided, volcanic island with an elevation of over 6000’, the elevations have forests of eucalyptus trees. A couple years back Madeira had severe fires, with the mountain sides burning out of control because of the highly flammable nature of the eucalyptus. The island government is currently looking at ways to eradicate the eucalyptus entirely from the island. Something that seems impossible to do in my opinion. Just thought it was interesting that the same tree, causes the same issues, continents away from each other.

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Hello Christech.

Eucalyptus trees are native only to Australia but were planted during the 1950/60s in Spain as a commercial source of "hardwood timber". These have now "gone feral" and become a problem in Europe because of their inflammability. The current Bush Fires in parts of Australia have consumed over a hundred houses and other buildings and cost several lives. But it is still only Spring and we have the Summer heat still to come. This has been made far worse than our usual Summer Bush-fire season as we are also suffering one of the worse droughts on record.

 

Bernie j.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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