AzBob

Help Identify car seen at the OCF.

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Saw this interesting car at the Old Car Festival in Greenfield Village last weekend, Unfortunately,  the information sheet on the windshield totally washed out in the photo.

It is not a Franklin.

 

 

Question Mark Car.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_2812.jpg

Edited by AzBob
Additional photo (see edit history)

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

It is a Holmes - circa 1921. There were more pics on a facebook page from the event. Sorry can't recall just where the post was though.

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nzcarnerd, rustyjazz1938 and ericmac, Thanks for identifying the 1921 Holmes touring car. 

 

I had never seen or heard of one before. The engine is obviously air cooled with overhead valves and quite advanced looking for 1921.

 

Bob

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Yes it's a 1921 Holmes. I spoke with the "owner", but I think I actually spoke to the owner's grandson - he mentioned his grandfather has 2 Holmes cars. For those with Facebook you can see a few more pictures of it on my Facebook page here.

 

The Holmes Company was founded in 1921 by the former Chief Engineer for the H H Franklin Company.

 

https://www.facebook.com/RogerMoffat/posts/10216987400450055

 

Roger

Edited by theKiwi (see edit history)

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I never knew of this make Holmes. However, the Holmes name is a revered one in my ancestry, and I wonder if Arthur Holmes, who started this company is a distant relative. My GGGGGrandfather Stetson Holmes (b1753 d1824, and named for an ancestor of his from the Stetson Hat people) was born in Pembrook Mass, his family later moved to New Hampshire. Although he was a tea party supporter and served in the Revolutionary Army in 1775-1777, he did not favor independence. He married Anna Shurtleff (whose ancestry included Henry Sampson who arrived on the Mayflower), and eventually, as a British Empire loyalist, when NH joined the union, he moved his family of 9 to Vermont which remained a British territory. He became a selectman and prosperous business leader, but when Vermont joined the union in 1791, he felt out of loyalty he must move to Canada, settling in Cape Breton Nova Scotia around 1800, bringing 5 of his 9 children with him. The area where he settled became known as Homeville after this revered ancestor, and his children were instrumental in populating a newly settled territory.  The small community still bears his name. I realize this anecdote is not car related, but I am always interested in making ancestral connections. Thanks for bearing with me.

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Very nice 1921 Holmes 4dr sedan. 

 

Pictures on the Facebook page below show the engine with a valve cover off, 3 valves per cylinder, 2 exhaust and one large intake actuated by rollers.

 

Exhaust manifold appears very “header like" as well. Certainly advanced engineering for its day.

 

Photo courtesy Roger Moffats FB page.

 

fbholmes.jpg

Edited by AzBob
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35 minutes ago, CHuDWah said:

That "alligator" hood is unusual for the era. 

All the 'coal scuttle' hoods opened similar.

 

This would include Renault, Stanley, Mack AC, some Franklins, and other trucks as well.

 

Craig

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I had the chance to see both of the Holmes at the Air Cooled Gathering at the Gilmore Car Museum in Hickory Corners several years ago.  At the time neither of the cars were running so it was a delight to see this one roaring around the Village under its own power. 

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9 hours ago, 8E45E said:

All the 'coal scuttle' hoods opened similar.

 

This would include Renault, Stanley, Mack AC, some Franklins, and other trucks as well.

 

Craig

 

 

Yeah, but 'butterfly' hoods were a lot more common.

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