Frantz

Why I like orphan cars

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I own 3 devauxs to 31 and a 32 some times it’s a little depressing trying to find parts when you walka swapmeet and find nothing,and then your excited to find a beat up hubcap,I remember in the 70s a guy telling me he didn’t have any foreign car parts,when I can I purchase any parts possible over the years I’ve helped others with what theyve needed,owning 3 devauxs and a moon tells my story,    Dave

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I got into orphan cars because they where inexpensive,in 1970 when I bought my first 31 devaux,I payed 250.00; my buddy bought a comparable 30 Chrysler for 1.500.00 ,over the years it gets a little depressing trying to find parts.but I’ve made some good friends and helped others at times,I remember going to a swapmeet in the seventies with a buddy of mine and a vendor told me he didn’t have no damn foreign car parts to this day when I see my old friend he always laughs and says I don’t have no damn foreign car parts,now I have 3 devauxs and still can’t find any parts,   Dave

 

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11 hours ago, zepher said:

'Pierce Arrow? Don't they make motor homes now?' No, you're thinking of Pace Arrow.

 

And then there's Nash.....

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6 hours ago, mercer09 said:

orphan cars are wonderful, till you need parts.

 

you better be a machinist or have a big wallet..............

 

why I now spend so much time on model A Fords.

 

 

^This^

 

I'd guess one could build a Model A from scratch using reproduction and/or commonly available original parts.  Pretty much the same for T and V-8, and Chevy is getting there.  But I owned a pre-WWII Plymouth, an orphan but not all that rare.  It still could be a challenge finding parts.

 

I love orphan cars, but I'll leave it to others with more fortitude (and money) to own, restore, and drive them.  I'll stick to Fords.  😎

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I may be thinking of "orphan" in a different context. I'd always thought of "orphan" as meaning makes that aren't produced anymore, so that could include big three brands like Desoto and Oldsmobile. I wonder if the OP didn't mean "independents" when talking about AMC or Studebaker. Of course, they're orphans, too (many decades over.) 

 

But that brings up another issue of semantics...were AMC and Studebaker really "independent" makers in a true sense? AMC was Hudson and Nash merged. Packard bought Studebaker in the 50's, so was everything after that point independent? True, they didn't market individual marques after the mergers for very long, but they did for a while.

 

I actually love the independents, though I don't own one. I end up going to ebay to look at old cars just for fun (not a great place to buy generally) and I usually look at them before  Fords and Chevys.

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James I guess you can call it what you like, but by any other name it still feels the same. We could refer to nearly all American cars as orphans today, but that doesn't mean that they are "independents." But does it really make any difference what they are called, because we know what they are.

 

In a world that is dominated by Chevrolet and Ford, the world for us who own some of the, seldom seen, independents is a different experience. From the people we meet, to the people interested in our cars, makes a car get together a different experience.

 

I'm an unabashed car lover and collector. A good car is a good car no matter by whom it was made. I feel fortunate that I never let myself  be painted into a corner, by a love affair with any single marque. In spite of owning several marques, it has become very clear, over the years, if I show up with one of my Studebakers, my day is going to be different.

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9 hours ago, padgett said:

Which brings up fun trivia: people who lost the right to use their own names.

Oldsmobile - REO

AC Spark Plugs - Champion

???

Chevrolet was the main one.

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20 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

I don't know what  you mean by Orphan cars, I just own mainstream stuff, like:

Graham, Studebaker, Corvairs, Subaru 360, Willlys, Packard,   😁

 

Hard to go anywhere in a Corvair without people talking to you and telling you many hearsay stories that are not true/they always know someone who owned one , etc.

Hard to go anywhere in a Graham without people asking "what is it?"😉

 

Honda 600 was the car sold in the US for several years. Used to see several in Richmond when I was driving my Subaru 360. 

 

And that is right, without Malcolm Bricklin importing the Subaru 360 and forming Subaru of America dealer network, there would not have been Bricklins, or Subarus for that matter!

 

If you live near the midwest you should bring your Corvair and Subaru to the Air Cooled Meet at the Gilmore Car Museum next year (every year) on the Saturday before Father's Day. This show is put on by the H H Franklin Club who have their museum - the Franklin Automobile Collection at Hickory Corners - at the Gilmore Car Museum. :-)

 

Roger

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So does Chalmers and Maxwell merger and then their rebranding as Chrysler make them not orphans?

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If pretty much everyone knows what your old car is without asking, that precludes some very interesting encounters and conversations.  

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You can find plenty of  interesting orphan cars just from GM in the '70s- '80s: Allante, Fiero, Reatta, Skyhawk, Sunbird, Vega that are quite undervalued IMNSHO at the moment. If you prefer something larger then the Cadillac Seville and Pontiac Phoenix (first one). Always thought the prettiest of the '73s was the Buick Centurion but few ever heard of them

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1 hour ago, padgett said:

You can find plenty of  interesting orphan cars just from GM in the '70s- '80s: Allante, Fiero, Reatta, Skyhawk, Sunbird, Vega that are quite undervalued IMNSHO at the moment. If you prefer something larger then the Cadillac Seville and Pontiac Phoenix (first one). Always thought the prettiest of the '73s was the Buick Centurion but few ever heard of them

 

I always thought the definition of an orphan car was one that the manufacturer was no longer in business.

Not a model that was discontinued but the manufacturer was still around.

 

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I just adopted this poor neglected orphan. Cast out of covered storage, left to fend for it's self in the harsh world. Told it was not wanted, would never amount to anything.:lol:

49 hudson 113.JPG

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I would have been all over that Xander.  Nice score. They don't look like that around here.  I have a guy that approached me about buying his 51 or 52 4 Door sedan at the show,  but haven't heard from him.  Doesn't sound rusty but very needy including a shot interior.  Now if it looked like this,  I would have been very excited. 

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On 9/11/2019 at 11:43 AM, Xander Wildeisen said:

Out here, Xander Wildeisen!:lol:

So what's the Alias? 

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There was an Auburn boat tail speedster that was for sale a few years back. A mix between an Auburn and a? Can not remember what else. 35-36 Boat tail body and a Franklin? Anybody remember that one?

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Abby-normal.

 

Well anything from Pontiac is an orphan but was thinking of abandoned model lines like the Corvair.

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We have found over the years that you can find any part for any car ever made if you have enough time and enough money...well...in our case enough customer's money.  Someone should start a thread on the aggravation and eventual Eureka moment folks went thru finding an elusive part.  We had given up on ever finding a 1917 Bell Covert transmission when one serendipitously turned up. Sometimes you have to stop looking before a part decides to reveal itself.  I recently bought a pair of optional external horns for a '32 Packard 900 after looking for over 35 years.

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I bought a 1937 Terraplane coupe just for the crank hole cover. I knew I could make a couple of bucks on the car, It was sold at a swap meet. (just missing a crank hole cover)  

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The one I adopted has an eight cylinder engine. It is stuck, maybe from sitting? Not sure, if it does not want to get up and running. I have a 308 Hornet engine that will drop right in there. And put the 8 engine in the corner.

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