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por 15-rustoleum, etc.


mercer09

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Ive always used rustoleum on the underside chassis of my cars. The por 15 looks to be much better............

 

my concerns of getting this stuff on myself and not getting it off.

 

please give me your opinions and any other products that might be better?

 

I am not going to paint over rust, but clean it well and then apply.

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Hello.  I used the por15 one time,it seemed like a descent product but way to pricey for me,the rustoleum I’ve used numerous times,the rustoleum has a very low  u.v. Rating ,  on  chassis and chassic  parts it’s good because it doesn’t get direct sunlight and most cars set in the garage or undercover,I found that if you paint the rustoleum then wait about 2 weeks and sand itwithsome500 grit wet and  dry sandpaper and repaint it you get a great finish and it doesn’t seem to tone down as much,I’ve been told they have a catalyst or hardener but I’ve never tried it,watch out because this paint gets on everything,very inexpensive product that is a good product,   Dave

 

 

 

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I used POR 15 on my 52 Plymouth in several areas including the underside, interior floor, and the wheels.  Never had any rust return that I have seen.  I only removed the loose rust as working on the chassis while on jack stands is a messy endeavor.  It is a real pain in the you know what to remove even when wet though lacquer thinner works pretty well.  If you get it on skin and it even dries a little it has to wear off which can take several days.  I have also used it in several other projects and have been pleased with the results.  That said I have talked to some folks who said it did not stop or even slow rust down at all. 

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Clean metal, use primer and Rustoleum.

 

Rusty metal, use Por-15 , Miracle Paint, etc, a moisture cure Urethane product. These do not stick well to clean metal! You can topcoat with Rustoleum if you wish to get a permanent shinny surface. Do clean off flaky rust before applying. 

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I keep lacquer handy to wipe up slobbers.

One guy putting POR 15 on the bottom side of an old Chevy truck dripped a bit to much on his shirt and lost a wad of chest hair.

It will scrape off your shin but sticks well to finger nails. Your metal should be a bit rough, 80 grit or sand blasted, wiped down with a clean dry rag..

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A friend's son spent almost a full day with POR-15 under his well-rusted '69 Camaro chassis.

by the time he was finished, the job looked great, but it took nearly a couple of weeks to get him back to looking normal.

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I have a lot of experience with POR-15. The MOST important thing to remember is to follow the instructions EXACTLY. This is amazing stuff, but it is NOT "forgiving." You MUST use a water-based degreaser first, and make sure your metal is either a bit rough, or treated with a metal prep solution. And it must be absolutely BONE DRY. I often will use a heat gun on a part before painting, and have often been surprised when a part that seemed totally dry actually begin changing color as moisture evaporated out of the pores from the hot air being blown on it (especially when the item is coated in rust). POR-15 is moisture-cured, and cannot tolerate even the slightest amount of hidden moisture or oil-based residue. Additionally, POR-15 must not be exposed to sunlight...not even occasionally. 

 

But if you use it right, this stuff is amazing. 

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Using the proper tool for the job at hand, usually gives a better, more finished and honest final result. I consider Por 15 as a tool of last resort. I like, I suppose a number of people here, have used it as a shortcut to doing the job right. In my estimation it is a great product when it is not considered feasible, or prudent to completely derust. Otherwise I don't see the point. If you have no rust why would give the impression that you do have it. It shouldn't take much longer, and might cost less, to do the job properly. If you use POR 15 and later have a change of heart, or have problems with the application, and want to remove it-forget about it. There are people that care about quality, and using POR 15, is mostly, incompatible with that result.

 

Edited by Buffalowed Bill (see edit history)
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I have never used POR 15 but DP-40 epoxy primer/sealer has great adhesion, and even if you don't remove all the rust it will last a long time. I did the back bumper on the Dodge truck with it about 15 years ago, and it has remained out in the weather. Maybe I'll post a pic tomorrow.

 

DP-40 is no longer allowed to be sold in California though.

 

I have now bought some 2K primer sealer, I think they call it, and have painted some rusty parts, such as "seat pans."

 

 

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2 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

Por-15 and Miracle Paint are barn paint.

 

???

 

Waayyyy too expensive to paint a barn with!😲

 

I've never seen moisture cured urethane in barn paint ingredients list...😉

 

It IS a good skin paint, as Mal shows!  Lasts a long time there.🤣

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I would recommend this 2K sealer stuff.

 

The difference between a sealer or primer/sealer and just regular primer is that the sealers do not allow moisture to pass through them. So if there is some rust left on the surface you paint it will be less likely to grow.

 

I painted the seat back frame which had surface rust that I cleaned off as best I could.

 

The seat pans were heavily rusted. They hold water. Deep rust pits. I went over them good with a wire brush (wheel on a drill) but didn't get it all. Then painted them. You can see the rust pits through the paint in the last picture.

 

 

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This DP-40 epoxy primer/sealer was better but no longer available in California. I painted that truck bumper almost 20 years ago, then it's been left out in the weather. It had started rusting and I just wanted to put a coat on it to preserve it. I'm impressed with how well it stuck, and how well it's held up. very durable.

 

I painted parts of my Alfa Romeo with it where rust was starting, like underside of the hood, around the edge pinch weld was starting to show rust. Hate that. Moisture getting in there it can rust from the inside out.

 

 

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Edited by mike6024 (see edit history)
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Roughly 15 years ago  I bought a brand new lawn tractor for 1/2 price from Lowes because it had been left outside for a year in the Ohio snow and salt mixture that severely rusted the hood. Rust didn't bother me much but since I had some Por-15 and tractor was black I thought I'd do an experiment. I lightly brushed the big paint flakes off and painted away.  Traded it in last year after storing it in open shed all those years and it never showed any signs of re-rusting, couldn't ask for anything better, it nails dry rust down forever!

 

Howard Dennis

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