fiddlerbill

1924 DB Roadster radiator needed

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I was interested in this thread because my 36 Dodge is going to need some radiator work (or maybe a new radiator).  I called Harry Heitin iAuto and spoke with Scott, the longtime owner of that firm.  (He bought the business from Harry Heitin many years ago.)  He warned me that a honeycomb core radiator (Which I think my car has) would be very expensive because there's only one supplier of honeycomb cores and they're in the UK.  How expensive, I wondered.  Well Scott's best guess was $2500 for a completely restored radiator.  Yikes!  That's not gonna happen.

Scott cautioned me that a lot of imported copper/brass radiators have problems because inlet/outlet fittings are not swaged to the tanks.  IOW there's no good mechanical connection; the solder is the load bearing part and that doesn't last long.  Something else for me to worry about...

 

Because I browsed the Brassworks site and saw that I could get a new D2 radiator for about $900.  Wonder where that's made?  Time for more phone calls.

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Interesting bits of information coming out of this thread. I have learned a bit more about the radiator and the ways of rebuilding needed to produce a new one. First is that to re-core with the honeycomb style common on these older cars is indeed costly. To properly form and seal one takes time which is expensive. a reproduced hand made honeycomb core can cost upwards of $2500. Then you have to consider the different types of honeycomb patterns which may not be available in my case which is a 6 sided pattern. The old way of sealing the material of the core was to dip both sides in solder. They then have to form the top and sides to fit the outer shell. Other methods can be used as well. Using a round tube core material, flat tube material and even a modern core with an aluminum outer slat that looks like the old style core. Each of these will have a different cooling capability and a different cost. If you are building a show car and need to be authentic then you probably need to pay the price for an original style honeycomb that matches the original pattern of your vehicle. 

Hopefully I have touched the subject without too much error. The members have provided some very valuable sources to consider. Thanks

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1 hour ago, Pete in PA said:

I was interested in this thread because my 36 Dodge is going to need some radiator work (or maybe a new radiator).  I called Harry Heitin iAuto and spoke with Scott, the longtime owner of that firm.  (He bought the business from Harry Heitin many years ago.)  He warned me that a honeycomb core radiator (Which I think my car has) would be very expensive because there's only one supplier of honeycomb cores and they're in the UK.  How expensive, I wondered.  Well Scott's best guess was $2500 for a completely restored radiator.  Yikes!  That's not gonna happen.

Scott cautioned me that a lot of imported copper/brass radiators have problems because inlet/outlet fittings are not swaged to the tanks.  IOW there's no good mechanical connection; the solder is the load bearing part and that doesn't last long.  Something else for me to worry about...

 

Because I browsed the Brassworks site and saw that I could get a new D2 radiator for about $900.  Wonder where that's made?  Time for more phone calls.

I may have a 1936 DB radiator if you are needing one.

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Replicore here in NZ make them too. http://www.replicore.co.nz/  They don't have quite the right type for the DA from what I could find, but they should do the D2 style.

 

I am also after one for my D2. But yes, the cost is huge. So also on the look out for a useable second hand one.

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I don't think a 1924 would be honeycomb core.  I believe they were round tube originally.

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