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K8096

Imperial in distress

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A friend of mine was showing me a new storage unit he's renting to store a few of his cars and we discovered this parked on the property too.   An Imperial LeBaron sedan.  It has Oregon plates on it with a 1995 sticker. The body is pretty good, but someone has begun taking parts off it.  The instrument cluster is removed, as are the taillights.  It's a pretty grey color with a touch of blue in it.          

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Always liked those stalked headlights. Looks like the carb was snuffed out.

Edited by padgett (see edit history)

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3 minutes ago, Dynaflash8 said:

Hopeless case in my opinion

I don't know about hopeless, but certainly challenging....

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Back in the old days, people would find something like a 1936 Packard convertible in the desert, a junkyard, the mountains.  They would drag it out and with many parts sedans they would restore it.  Those days are truly in the old days.  Modern milleniums aren't going to do that with what is available to them in these days......Classic car days are gone.....even pre-WWII car days are gone.  Maybe a 55-56 Ford crown victoria or a a 54 Ford or Mercury glass top would be worhy, but not much else.  That's just my opinion.

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My latest restoration started out like this in the pictures. It's been driven and is now torn down and repainted ready for reassembly. Any restoration is possible. It will be Concours car when finished.

 

 

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Edited by Locomobile (see edit history)
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That is truly a car that deserved what you are doing.  I thought 95% of cars like this had been found and restored.  Since a large portion of cars like yours were restored in the 1950's and early 1960's they will be coming around now or soon for a new restoration.  Some cars like your were restored in the 1940's  and many ended up moldering away in some dusty garage or small museum.

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)
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9 minutes ago, Dynaflash8 said:

That is truly a car that deserved what you are doing.  I thought 95% of cars like this had been found and restored.

 

Thanks, I think these little steamers are an important part of the early American automotive industry and need to be preserved. This is a model 65 Conrad built in Buffalo New York and the last one known to exist, and the last two-seater runabout. There are two others in the world, but they are 4 seater Dos-a-dos. If this one wasn't saved there would be none, lost to history. We need to take a lesson from the Brits and preserve more of our history. It was an extensive laborious project.

 

Even now, people are still pulling these little steamers and others out of the back of old cluttered barns, one just a few years ago which looked like a Marlboro (Marlboro NH) maybe.

 

-Ron

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2 hours ago, Locomobile said:

My latest restoration started out like this in the pictures. It's been driven and is now torn down and repainted ready for reassembly. Any restoration is possible. It will be Concours car when finished.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While this car and its restoration appear truly magnificent, I hope no one minds me pointing out the fact, although just for posterity, that to treat an equal extent and quality restoration to something like the subject vehicle of this thread would require at least 50 to 100 times the amount of both, time & money, yet could easily exceed that, even if it was not missing a single piece.

So no wonder some here consider it a rather hopeless project

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On ‎9‎/‎5‎/‎2019 at 7:26 PM, K8096 said:

A friend of mine was showing me a new storage unit he's renting to store a few of his cars and we discovered this parked on the property too.

 

Looks to me like vandals.

Could have been abandoned, but aren't things in storage lots supposed to be somewhat protected?

 

I will take the headlights, they would look good collecting dust on a shelf.

Is it in Oregon?

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By the way.

You will be surprised at what those headlights weigh.

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4 hours ago, TTR said:

to treat an equal extent and quality restoration to something like the subject vehicle of this thread would require at least 50 to 100 times the amount of both, time & money,

 

Not to be persnickity, but parts for 120 year old steam vehicles are not cheap or easy to find, the new drive block chain was 800 dollars. The boiler and burner was 10 grand. :)

 

Every piece has to be rebuilt, remade, replated, re-something. They are very laborious expensive restorations.

 

One of the survivors is in the Denmark Transportation museum and they have assisted us a great deal with dimensions and information from their vehicle as a comparison. We searched for years for a set of original steam and air gauges and finally found a set in New Zealand. The steam pressure range is not exactly correct, but like Leno said about hunting Doble parts, you take what you can get. (Only 47 Dobles were ever built and only a few survive)

 

-Ron

Edited by Locomobile (see edit history)
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7 hours ago, Locomobile said:

My latest restoration started out like this in the pictures. It's been driven and is now torn down and repainted ready for reassembly. Any restoration is possible. It will be Concours car when finished.

 

 

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Thank you so much for posting the photos of this truly worthwhile restoration. It sort of proves a point, while the OP Chrysler is something I couldn't walk by fast enough it caused you to post all these wonderful photos that I would have otherwise missed. Is there an online story of the find and your early restoration progress, if so I need to see it. Bob

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I'll bet we all would love to see that too. Likewise, some details about your little steam tug boat. Thanks for sharing with us.   -   Carl 

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Bob,

 

I have two articles I wrote a few years ago for the steam car club Bulletin, but they are in PDF and too big to post on here. 20 megs each. I'll try to figure out a way.

 

-Ron

 

 

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Fantastic restoration on the steamer. Back in the late 60’s and early 70’s it was normal to see the steam tours going throughout New England. I attended several, and the first car I ever drove was a 20hp Stanley when I was seven. That fascinated me so much I have never stopped chasing cars since then. Twenty five steam cars out on Cape Cod Tour every fall was the usual number. I haven’t seen five with steam up at a show in the last 25 years, and I attend a lot of events. The dedication to bring that car back really speaks volumes about the character and work ethic of the owner. NOTHING is easy on a car like that, not one single bolt. Time researching, chasing suppliers, parts, and the knowledge curve all add up to thousands of hours. Only the guy who had his hands on every single part will ever truly understand the undertaking.  

 

I say say to Ron........Bravo! Ed

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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I should probably start a new thread, but here are the pages, please forgive my feeble attempts at literary composition.

Article 1

 

 

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Here is the other: Some of the info has changed, at that time I thought it was an 02 model 60, but have determined since that it is an 01 model 65. Also, I did not write any further articles and the project has progressed a great deal since.

-Ron

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Thanks Ron! Looks like great reading for later this evening. Steam was such a big part of the local hobby 20 years ago, then four good friends left for the big steam meet in the shy. Bob 

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The steam folks I hang with are all older than me and a real inspiration. Nudging 80 and still going like teenagers, one of them still rides a dirt bike regularly. Another one rides his like new 1975 750 BMW over to my house regularly, in the rain, cold etc. They never complain about being tired or in pain or not feeling well, they just keep going. I have trouble keeping up with them. They don't drink, smoke and they eat right and stay active.

The steam hobby will keep one very busy.

 

-Ron

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Like Bob has, I am starting to read this extremely well-written account. VERY hard to put down, now several pages in. Easy reading on an iPad mini, in high resolution. Enormous detail in the pictures comes through. I am eager to check out the YouTube you have referenced in the article. Yes, by all means put all your wonderful creations in their own well deserved showcase threads. I am behind on things I must do before getting back to the read, but will do so ASAP. Again, thank you VERY much, Ron. What unusually great talent !  -  Carl 

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