richie3

1951 Chevrolet Bel Air

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1951 Chevrolet Bel Air 2-Door Hard Top.  Honest Car.  Driveable and Ready to Enjoy.  $11,700.  rwill1914 at aol.com

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.......and side trim mouldings.......might be a1952 titled as a 1951. 'Nuff said. 

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It looks to have the potential to be a very decent driver. We had a 1952 Chevy convertible with Powerglide which was a sweet handling and driving time-machine

 

The car appears to actually be a 1952 Model Year Chevrolet Bel-air.

 

The Bel-air designation was at that time, the description of a pillarless two-door "hardtop convertible", not actually a convertible. but without a "B" pillar - so it "looked" like a convertible of the era. The style supposedly originated with the 1949/1950 Buick/Cadillac models, although some have also noted Chrysler's use of a hard top mated to a convertible during tat same era.

 

As noted, the grille, parking/turn signal lights, front fender& door stainless trim, rear quarter stainless, as well as the trunk badging are 1952.

This may be the case where it was produced in 1951 as a 1952 model-year car. Certain states back then would title cars as of the sale date, rather than the model-year. There are also cases of a left-over being titled as a couple / few years newer, having sat unsold and/or untitled-unregistered in dealer inventory for an extended period of time. 

 

Several years ago one of my late friends bought a "new" thirty-five (35) year old never titled 1965 Oldsmobile convertible. It was sold to him with the original MCO,  the Manufacturer's Certificate of Origin - sometimes known as MSO for M'fg's Statement of Origin. The Olds was brought to the Hershey Car Corral by an employee of the original receiving dealership in Rhode Island. Since it was at that time an untitled vehicle, the local DMV was initially unwilling to transfer and register it until it was pointed out that, despite the p[assing of years, it was essentially the same as any "Brand New Vehicle".

 

Looks like an honest ride -

Good luck to the seller, and to the eventual buyer. 

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Marty, thanks for your comments, some of us are focused primarily on pre WWII machinery and I like to read good , to the point,  information about things like this as it sets a better picture of what was going on in the post war era.  It also gives the 'newbies' a better understanding and appreciation as well.

Walt

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21 minutes ago, Walt G said:

Marty, thanks for your comments, some of us are focused primarily on pre WWII machinery and I like to read good , to the point,  information about things like this as it sets a better picture of what was going on in the post war era.  It also gives the 'newbies' a better understanding and appreciation as well.

Walt

 

A bit off topic, and with apologies to the seller,

but I really like the Chevy Hardtop in this post-

 

Thanks Walt. I'm pretty-much a pre-WWII guy also, but grew up in the NY/NJ area in the '50s. You may note from my signature that I appreciate everything from Brass-era through modern iron (plastic?).

As a "Car-Crazy" Kid, growing up in the fabulous 1950s, we ate, breathed, slept, and dreamed cars, cars, cars. We could identify almost anything from two city-blocks away by year, make, and model - sometimes even by the sound of the exhaust or the sound of the starter. The showroom floor behind the paper-covered windows of a dealership at the time of the new-car reveal each Autumn, was Valhalla to us. Even more exciting was the General Motors Motorama, a free show at New York City's Waldorf-Astoria hote (as welll, where GM unveiled all of the new models from all of the GM lines, as well as fantastic stage shows with a Big Band, dancers and singers to rival any Broadway show - AND the opportunity to actually sit behind the wheel of every GM make and model, including many of the "Dream Cars". I sat in a Buick Dream Car which, instead if a rear-view mirror, had a TV display screen connected to a video camera which showed what was behind the car (today's Backup Camera?), but that was in the early/middle 1950s! When they premiered the fibreglass body of the to-be-released 1953 Corvette, they had a button for a trip-hammer in a showcase, displaying how many thousands of times the panel could be hit without damaging it, and I must have stood there beating the "POLO-WHITE" 'Vette fender hundreds of times, until a man asked me to move on so his kid could have his turn. Late Fall 1952, sitting at the wheel of the 1953 ElDorado convertible, I was King of the World - and Dad was using his Hand-Wound 8mm Kodak movie camera to record me in that beauty, never imagining that some day I'd own my very own 1941, 1952, 1954, and 1970 Cadillac convertibles - or that he and Mom would eventually have a gold 1972 Sedan DeVille, serve as Captain and retire from the Linden (NJ) Fire Department, and move to the Fort Lauderdale area.

 

Thanks for you very kind comments,

 

and best, again, to the seller and ultimate buyer of this Chevy-

your car will be a great addition to somebody's weekends.

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