mrcvs

Not Disappointed!!!

Recommended Posts

Edit:  My car has sold!  THANK YOU ALL FOR YOUR SUPPORT!   👍 I have to say, I am rather disappointed...and no surprise why younger folks just aren't that interested in the hobby, and it's hurting!

 

Here I have a 1930 Model A Ford for sale, have dropped the price now to $9500 on Craigslist, a few inquiries, but still very little interest.  I'm told $11k is a fair price for this car.  Apparently not.

 

The car runs fine, it's solid, does need repainting and minor body work, has a rebuilt engine.  Inquires are basically, did Schwalm do the engine?  I have since learned that that's a $6000 endeavour!

 

What's wrong with folks?  You actually think I would sink $6k into this car and still ask only $9500?

 

No surprise why there's no young blood in this hobby, and it is full of folks who have unrealistic expectations (want perfect cars, slow to open up their wallets).

Fordor1.jpe

Fordor10.jpe

Edited by mrcvs
No longer disappointed! (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I usually don’t get sucked into this kind of BS story, but since you are asking for it I figure why not...

 

Your car might have been nice years ago, but that splotchy paint in the cowl is probably hiding a rust issue that is well known in A’s and not inexpensive to repair properly, the lineup between the front and rear door looks to be off by a solid 1/4” which adds to the concern of any potential buyers, although the generator might work fine it looks like rusty sh*t which makes me concerned about what else is going to be an issue under the hood. Quick observations from two pictures, added to all this is that it’s a Fordor as opposed to an open car which I love but there’s not a lot of interest in. It’s a hard sale.

 

A couple years ago I sold a roadster and a phaeton both being priced in the mid teens, that roadster had a fresh engine in it from George King who was as reputable as Schwalm or J&L etc.

 

Just my opinion, but you are overly optimistic that you have a highly desirable car, and I believe it’s going to take you a long time to find that right buyer, crying about it ain’t going to work...

Edited by Mark Wetherbee
Toned it down some (see edit history)
  • Like 8
  • Thanks 3
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would add to Mark's comments that you also admit it needs a paint job.  If you did the paint yourself, you'd still have $1500 or more tied up in materials, with the high cost of paint these days.  

 

If you had someone else do it, then $5000 would be cheap (and it'd probably have to be a relative or someone you had compromising pictures of to get it done at that price).

 

So, paint alone can kill any interest in the car at your price point.  Sad, but with the high cost of restoration these days, any car that's deemed a "project" (i.e. needing paint or upholstery or major sorting out) will go wanting in the marketplace.

 

I hope you find a good home for it, but I agree that you may be a little optimistic, from your end, on the price point.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm no Model A expert, but I would think the dayglow green wheels are diminishing it's appeal to a potential buyer. If I was trying to sell it I would repaint the wheels gloss black and give it broader appeal.

 

Cool old car, though. Hang in there, just have to find the right buyer.

 

-Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

This discussion again?

Well, I am at a low price and still no takers.

 

I realize it needs repainting and that all costs.  But buyers are unrealistic.  Sink 5 to 8 k into it and have a 20k car.

 

Sad to say, but what an awful hobby.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As they say in real estate it has no curb appeal.  If you sell a house they tell you to freshen it up.  The firewall would turn me off without looking at the rest of the car.  Look at it from a potential buyer and what does he see when he walks up to it,

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do buyers really expect to get a car like this for 4k????

 

Doors don't sag, redone engine, fairly solid car.

 

My wife has backed off on getting rid of it immediately, but it still has to go.  It can't sit outside in the winter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, mrcvs said:

Do buyers really expect to get a car like this for 4k????

 

 

 

Yes. Maybe less.

Anyone seriously looking for a Model A know the prices will continue to fall. They want to pay less to get in front of the trend and don’t want to put money in to a car that will only depreciate. 

It’s not an awful hobby, it’s a marketplace telling you what reality is.

Edited by Car-Nicopia (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any car is worth what a willing buyer will pay to a willing seller on that particular day. I have  owned a very similar Model A Ford in the past. It is looks like a great old car to drive and enjoy. It is not a show car. To make it a show car will take more cash than what it would sell for after the restoration. There are lots of Model A Fords out there. If you want to sell it, it can be sold ,but not for the amount that you apparently want to get for it. I would assess the car as being somewhere between a number 4 and number 3 condition on the Old Cars Price Guide scale. Old Cars Price Guide puts a number 4 value at $4,800 and a number 3 value at $10,800. If I was in the market for a Model A like yours in that condition, I would expect it to probably be about a $7,000 to $8,000 car. As has been pointed out, it is a great hobby and from where I am, I see the hobby flourishing in the coming years but antique cars are seldom a good financial investment. Enjoy the hobby and don't expect a windfall when selling a hobby car when the time comes to sell. If you really want to sell it, take it to Hershey, put it in the Car Corral with $9,000 or best offer and see what happens. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's an "awful hobby" because you cannot recoup the money you spent? Do you golf? Travel? Collect comic books? Do you expect to recoup the money you spent on those hobbies? If you did not get enough enjoyment out of the car to offset the possible loss when you sell it maybe you picked the wrong hobby.

  • Like 13
  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Overpriced for condition...……………….58 years in the hobby, what could I know? 

 

 

Bob 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had many good posts in the thread you had deleted ,  so I won't bother much with this one,  but it was all stated in the last thread very politely.   Maybe not as nicely this time after seeing all our responses and effort go poof.   That price I had in mind was right at around 8 and I still expect you need local exposure to sell it.  See what that $9500 you are asking can buy.  I'm starting to see next level cars creeping in at that price point and some don't need as much freshening. 

A good detailing will go a long way. Clean the white walls, give the thing a polish.  It will give a potential buyer,  the idea you take care of not neglect the car.  That's why the car dealers do it. IT's not because they like cleaning up old wrecks. Fresh photos on a sunny day with a little chrome sparkle help alot.  

Would you rather buy a car that looks like this or the second photo? 

You are trying to sell the car on how much fun it will be.  not how much work the next owner is going to need to put into it. 

IMG_6828.JPG

IMG_6830.JPG

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing, the modern generation wants instant gratification and the approval of their peers. To them a car like this should be in front of a nightclub or restaurant: a decoration and nothing more. Also unless a high end exotic, a car is an appliance & transportation at least cost & main criteria is how easy it is to park. For them a Ford (did they call them "Fordor"s back then, not my field) is too big and is too slow and what is a clutch ?

 

I just sold a nice Reatta Convertible that needed nothing for considerably less than I had in it. Suspect part of the issue is that Hagerty appraisals are more what cars should be insured for then what they are actually worth.

 

Auburn's Caddy is a great example of something interesting that can keep up with modern traffic, most were automatics, and some even had A/C. I still would like a '57 3/4 size caddy with suicide doors and dual quads but is now in the same category for me as a Facel-Vega HK-500 - unlikely.

Edited by padgett (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, mrcvs said:

Well, I am at a low price and still no takers.

 

I realize it needs repainting and that all costs.  But buyers are unrealistic.  Sink 5 to 8 k into it and have a 20k car.

 

Sad to say, but what an awful hobby.

 

The price might be low and fair to you, but obviously not to the potential buyers.  To make that car in the 20 K range it would require more around 15-20 K, and that is providing the engine was rebuilt correctly and not requiring another rebuild, and some club hardware on the radiator would not hurt the value either. Do you think that the potential buyers are feeling that the seller is unrealistic? 

 

It is far from an awful hobby, and take exception to that comment. One thing that makes this hobby unique, and I have said this before is that it is the only hobby that everyone feels they have to turn a profit. 

Good luck

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How do you even see what others like this sell for?  Craigslist only has my local market with limited similar cars for sale.  Hemmings is all I know, and that's more national and high end.

 

I never represented this car as a show car.  It's a fun driver.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I see here is a frustrated seller with classic car that isn't selling with a craigslist add and all I can say is don't blame the 30 something younger age group for their lack of interest in a craigslist add for a car built in the 30's.

 

Instant gratification and things that are shinny appeal to all age groups and a car that isn't prepped and ready for sale isn't going to bring top dollar in any age group, A car doesn't need to be perfect to sell fast for a decent price, but it does need to look like it's worth more than the asking price and craigslist is great for selling a lot of thing, but facebook is where you post when you want to find the "younger folks" .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh there is profit to be made,  but often it involves a ton of luck #1,  alot of sweat equity, a bunch of know how, then find a "diamond in the rough" that needs more sweat than money to bring it up a grade.  My wife usually laughs of all the cars I have sold,  and really not that many compared to alot of car guys, She says so in the end you made a wage and didn't really make any money on that one.  I say yup,  but I got to have it and fix it up for a while,  now on to the next. 

It's all about starting with an undervalued car that you bought from the previous owner that was often to lazy to do the work to make it better them selves to get the full value out of it.  Really no different than a car dealer does on a late model car,  though that is also much more complicated with the new fuzzy math financing they can swing where we have to find a buyer with cash in had. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, mrcvs said:

it is full of folks who have unrealistic expectations (want perfect cars, slow to open up their wallets).

 

From my introduction to the hobby to the present, with few exceptions, I have always viewed as bunch of grouchy old farts who didn't like nothing unless they could steal it. Then brag to their cronies about the deal they got... if they would even tell what they paid.

 

I was very young when my grandfather pointed out the man with a pocket full of fish hooks, and I always remember that and smile when I walk through Hershey.

 

Each successive generation seems to find fault with everything about their replacements and they all turn out the same.

 

These "young un's" will buy when they can steal it and use the untaxed money from under the mattress like the old farmer did to buy his car.

 

Each generation starts out bad and ends up brilliant.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, mrcvs said:

I realize it needs repainting and that all costs.  But buyers are unrealistic.  Sink 5 to 8 k into it and have a 20k car.

 

If you are convinced of that go ahead and invest the 5-8k in it and sell if for 20k. Then you will make a profit instead of selling for a loss.  You also will have proved that buyers really are unrealistic.  I don't know a thing about your car but from experience I know a little about buyers. The number one thing I can tell you about buyers is they ultimately determine the value of your car.

Edited by Ronnie (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, mrcvs said:

Also how do I get this to Hershey?

 

MRCVS, you have been advised in this thread and previous deleted thread to take it to the Hershey Car Corral. Since you are somewhat local to Hershey, I  would do whatever it takes to get it there. Rent a trailer. I too had a pre war car that was a tough sell, tried Craigslist etc. nothing. Entering it in the local car show car corral sold the car. Lots of exposure and potential buyers at a car corral. Nonetheless, it must be priced to sell.

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by AzBob (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Ronnie said:

If you are convinced of that go ahead and invest the 5-8k in it and sell if for 20k. Then you will make a profit instead of selling for a loss. 

 

I have a car that I have been planning to sell for about a year and a half, but I need to do about $1,000 of work to it before I can point to it and say "needs nothing". The difference in this car would mean about $3500 to me. The most important thing is selling a car that "needs nothing". Anything less is going to cost you. I will do the work to have a smoother sale.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, mrcvs said:

How do you even see what others like this sell for?  Craigslist only has my local market with limited similar cars for sale.  Hemmings is all I know, and that's more national and high end.

 

I never represented this car as a show car.  It's a fun driver.

Do you belong to MARC if you are looking for a place to sell.  People in the club know what the value is and will buy when the price is right.  I too take exception to your comment about the hobby.  I have been collecting for over sixty years and have met some of the nicest people in the world and if you do sell to some one outside of the hobby I plan on welcoming them to the hobby.  I also have two sons who collect and many grandkids who enjoy them.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...