keiser31

How many have more than one car built by the same people?

Recommended Posts

I was thinking about my two 1931 Dodge Brothers business coupes being built the same month and had some questions come to mind. I was wondering if my cars were built by the same guys on the same shift on different days in February of 1931. I don't see any exact time of day their assemblies were finished, just the dates. I wonder what the odds are and how many other old car owners here have two cars (or more) made so closely that the same guys may have built both of them?

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Benefits of AACA Membership.

I wonder if the guys that built your two cars were still working in December 1931 when my car was put together - the first week of DL production.  Were your cars built in Detroit?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My (former) two Citroen D-21 Station Wagons (Safari) were built just one week apart.

They were later both owned by Trimacar 

There were a couple of differences between them:

The one built 12/29/1970 had a front fender-mounted radio antenna and conventional A/C set-up with the condenser just ahead of the radiator.

The one built 1/5/1971 (one week later) had a rooftop radio antenna and an improved A/C set-up with cool air slots in the bumper tips, a "Y" adapter in the piping to the two individual condensers with electric fans ducting the exhausted air directly into the front wheelwells, not adding any heat to the engine compartment. This idea was carried through the 1971 and 1972 models built after 1/1/71, as far as I can determine, as well as future mode D-Series not imported into the USA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not mine, but a member of the Packard Club here in Oz has two 1933 Packards with consectutive numbers, see pic's.

33 #1.JPG

33 #2.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, speaking of assembly lines, since you have two 31 Dodges, take the body off one of them and hoist it above the rolling chassis.  Then have your completed car in front of it showing the end of the Dodge assembly line in Hamtramck, MI.  Then you could dress up as an auto worker and you could hire me to wear a suit and fedora to be the final auto inspector.  I don't why I even said this, too much time on my hands I guess.  Marc.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My current '52 Plymouth Cambridge is about 1200 Vehicle Numbers away from my father's original car.  Both cars were built in Detroit.  I'd suspect there were at least a few line workers that worked on both cars.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have two 1930 Chrysler model 70s, a Royal Coupe and a Brougham. They were built a few days apart and signed off by the same inspector according to the build sheets. The coupe is a show car and the Brougham is all original, no repaints or anything. I haven't been able to locate another 2 door 1930 model 70 Brougham in the US, found one in England. Has to be more of them out there.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Taylormade said:

I wonder if the guys that built your two cars were still working in December 1931 when my car was put together - the first week of DL production.  Were your cars built in Detroit?

Both cars were built in Hamtramck, Michigan.

 

9 hours ago, Marty Roth said:

My (former) two Citroen D-21 Station Wagons (Safari) were built just one week apart.

They were later both owned by Trimacar 

There were a couple of differences between them:

The one built 12/29/1970 had a front fender-mounted radio antenna and conventional A/C set-up with the condenser just ahead of the radiator.

The one built 1/5/1971 (one week later) had a rooftop radio antenna and an improved A/C set-up with cool air slots in the bumper tips, a "Y" adapter in the piping to the two individual condensers with electric fans ducting the exhausted air directly into the front wheelwells, not adding any heat to the engine compartment. This idea was carried through the 1971 and 1972 models built after 1/1/71, as far as I can determine, as well as future mode D-Series not imported into the USA.

My cars were built during the model change, too. The first one built has two door hinges at the front of the door. The other has three. Upgrade for strength, maybe. There are a few other differences even though they are the same model and were ordered with nearly identical features. Both cars are supposed to be Marquette Blue with black belt molding and cream pin striping. Both were ordered with wire wheels, but both actually were delivered with wood spokes. It was the Great Depression after all and they used whatever they had on hand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was in my teens we never had many Chrysler products on the car lot. It seemed like every time I went to buy parts you had to know what day it was assembled, who assembled it, and the name of his oldest male child; especially for brake parts.

 

Maybe there weren't as many people on the line as I was led to believe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I belong to a forum for owners of  Airstream trailers, some owners of fifties Airstreams have found the signature Johnny Alonzo or Made by Johnny Alonzo inside their trailers while doing repairs. Quite a few have shown up, I suggested they start a club Friends of Johnny Alonzo for owners of trailers he signed. Has anyone found similar signatures inside their cars?

http://www.airforums.com/forums/f492/who-was-johnny-alonzo-40088.html

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Harold said:

My current '52 Plymouth Cambridge is about 1200 Vehicle Numbers away from my father's original car.  Both cars were built in Detroit.  I'd suspect there were at least a few line workers that worked on both cars.

I wonder if your car was built by the same folks that mine was. 52 Cranbrook 4 door also from Detroit

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, plymouthcranbrook said:

I wonder if your car was built by the same folks that mine was. 52 Cranbrook 4 door also from Detroit

Tough to tell because the Cambridge and Cranbrook had different series of Vehicle Numbers (IIRC, Cambridges from Detroit started with '15' and Cranbrooks began with '12' and went up into the '13's' later in the year.)

 

My father took delivery of his car on March 1, 1952 and it was built in early February.  The one I have now is a little newer, and I believe it was built late in February.  I should probably get the build card for my present car and pin it down.

 

FWIW, Plymouths built late in the '52 model year had the gray painted metal rear window molding along the bottom only.  The other three sides of the rear window had exposed rubber gasket.  The earlier cars had a four-sided rear window trim molding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to have two 1962 Lincoln Convertibles with consecutive serial numbers.  Both were sold new in the Florida Keys, at the same dealership and both wound up in Southwest Michigan owned by me. The ivy green car had literally no options while the white car had all of them. The white car is now in Northern Michigan,  painted red and the ivy green car was last in San Antonio painted yellow with a two-toned tan interior..where I lost track of it.

Edited by ericmac
Clarification (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now