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How do you terminate Bow Drill at the sockets


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It gets folded under about a quarter inch and  overlaps the metal a quarter inch or so, using a drilled hole on the outside of the iron to accept a tack to hold it.  If you don't have those holes, and don't wish to drill them, then you could just fold under and butt up against the end of the metal.   I don't seem to have any good pictures, this is a picture of an original early top and you can see the "joint" where they meet....these are leather covered irons as was done on many very early cars...

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Another suggestion- when you're positioning your top bows, cut two pieces of wood the correct length for the body to back bow measurement, but do it in such a way that there's a notch of some kind in each end of each piece, and when the body and bow are resting in the notches the measurement is correct.  Then, install these pieces temporarily, and place a couple of temporary straps from bow to body.  Now you have a good way to hold rear bow in place, and judging by the type of locking top you have, that should position the other bows correctly while you fit the top.

 

Do not use the old top as a pattern, but rather a reference.  Fit each new piece of the top to the car as you go.

 

Picture of new top made using the above pictured top as a reference (original top remains intact, I made two of these tops on new structures)

 

Have fun and good luck!

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Thanks David.  I guess this is what the hole is for in my socket.  

 

I know you use jute webbing and I do also but some people use seat belt material and a F150 truck seat belt has enough material to do one side.

 

I had a problem while painting my irons and sockets in holding them without leaving a wire mark.  I ended up reinstalling my dummy bows and turning the unit upside down.  Made a great painting stand.

 

I have two staves left over from my 1923 Dodge Screen Side top which will make great measuring sticks.

 

I just save the old material but in this case a person wants the material for a boot to match an original top and I promised it to him.

 

Have a great labor day.

 

 

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Yep, that's the hole I was talking about.  Darn, that makes twice this week I was correct about something, call me cold cuts 'cause I'm on a roll!

 

I use the jute webbing just because it's strong and that's what was used originally.  I'm somewhat of a purist, although with things hidden such as those straps it's probably just a compulsion more than a necessity. 

 

I also spit tacks, and rarely use staples unless there's a situation that calls for it.  Takes a little bit longer, but it's much easier to remove and adjust with a tack, and after doing a couple of sofas for my wife, I absolutely hate removing staples. Damn trigger happy furniture upholstery guys...….

 

I've had people ask for items made from old, original material.  It's great in theory, hell on wheels in practice.  Get some nice, half rotted, old material, and then try to sew it and have it not tear at the seams....what fun...then explain to the person, who waited patiently for that donor material to show up, that it doesn't work.  Life's too short.

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4 hours ago, trimacar said:

IYep, that's the hole I was talking about.  Darn, that makes twice this week I was correct about something, call me cold cuts 'cause I'm on a roll!

 

I use the jute webbing just because it's strong and that's what was used originally.  I'm somewhat of a purist, although with things hidden such as those straps it's probably just a compulsion more than a necessity. 

 

I also spit tacks, and rarely use staples unless there's a situation that calls for it.  Takes a little bit longer, but it's much easier to remove and adjust with a tack, and after doing a couple of sofas for my wife, I absolutely hate removing staples. Damn trigger happy furniture upholstery guys...….

 

I've had people ask for items made from old, original material.  It's great in theory, hell on wheels in practice.  Get some nice, half rotted, old material, and then try to sew it and have it not tear at the seams....what fun...then explain to the person, who waited patiently for that donor material to show up, that it doesn't work.  Life's too short.

If you on a roll buy a lottery ticket.

Thanks

Jan

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 9/2/2019 at 11:08 AM, trimacar said:

Yep, that's the hole I was talking about.  Darn, that makes twice this week I was correct about something, call me cold cuts 'cause I'm on a roll!

 

I use the jute webbing just because it's strong and that's what was used originally.  I'm somewhat of a purist, although with things hidden such as those straps it's probably just a compulsion more than a necessity. 

 

I also spit tacks, and rarely use staples unless there's a situation that calls for it.  Takes a little bit longer, but it's much easier to remove and adjust with a tack, and after doing a couple of sofas for my wife, I absolutely hate removing staples. Damn trigger happy furniture upholstery guys...….

 

I've had people ask for items made from old, original material.  It's great in theory, hell on wheels in practice.  Get some nice, half rotted, old material, and then try to sew it and have it not tear at the seams....what fun...then explain to the person, who waited patiently for that donor material to show up, that it doesn't work.  Life's too short.

That’s a good line appreciated by a guy who grew up in a USDA slaughterhouse and retail meat market! I too prefer to use tacks as often as I can and have gotten pretty good getting the right location with the setting swing of the hammer (that took some practice!) What’s crazy is how I look for the old Atlas brand tacks whenever I go to flea markets and yard sales now. These crappy Chinese galvanized tacks have so much taper to them that they easily work right out of the wood. With the blue tacks, a good wet mouth of spit helps them rust slightly and is supposed to aid in the staying fast in the wood. If I do use staples on a roof, I do use SS ones so there’s less chance of rust staining though the blue tacks are exactly the opposite. 

 

I enjoyed reading your roofing tips tips and learning something new.

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I enjoy using tacks too, until my attention wanders and I'm looking down at a tack through the flesh of my finger.  The important thing is to get away from the upholstery fabric before you pull the tack out, don't want to get blood on what you're working on....not a joke!

 

Theoretically, tacks are supposed to have a very thin pointed end that actually curls under, making a "J" shape that holds the tack into the wood or tacking strip.  It's hard to find quality tacks these days, I've bought some from McMaster Carr and you had to throw away about every tenth tack, deformed head or deformed point. I call some of these "mermaid" tacks, as they have a point with two little fins sticking up on each side.

 

Knowing how little a collector car sits in the rain, and how long it takes for a blued tack to rust, I don't worry with SS tacks.

 

It used to be that tacks came marked "sterilized", but I don't see that anymore.  Guess it meant safer to put in your mouth.

 

Worked at White Post, fellow trimmer went to the bathroom.  After flushing, he realized he had some tacks in his mouth so he spit them into bowl.  A visitor came out of the bathroom soon after, walked into the upholstery shop, and said "Damn, you trimmer guys are tough, if what I say in the commode is any indication, crapping tacks....."

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