Gary_Ash

Correct way to install cotter pins in castle nuts?

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1 hour ago, trini said:

Before installing a split pin run a drill through the hole and smear a little grease in the hole. Installation of every nut  bolt and even wood screws should be smeared . I find using a smear of grease on wood screws take less pressure to sink the head in.  

 

That's a good point. I use anti-seize on every fastener, but never thought to use it on cotter pins before. Thanks.

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5 hours ago, trini said:

 I find using a smear of grease on wood screws take less pressure to sink the head in.  

Interesting. I was taught to use a little soap! Did it yesterday; makes it much easier.

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I pre drill and use a touch  of grease at the tip of the screw. It goes in easier  If put too much and it spit out at the head wipe it off with a wet varsol  cloth.  Of course there night be areas where it must be avoided. The reason I suggest greasing is when I removed screws form my 28 DB the threads were so rusted and some so rusty that it just turned without backing out. Even the holes were rusted. They were mostly countersunk flat slotted screws I collected all the screws bolts washers and nuts , put them in a can and topped up with vaporrust . And did they came out beautiful. I was able to reuse the half inch bolts and nuts that holds the wood sill to the frame. WANT to reuse the old screws in the same old holes ? Easy. Drill the holes oversize and plug them. Most of the screw heads were damaged while removing. I tried using # 6 x a 1/4  from Home Depot to replace them but the heads do not go in far enough., Sticks out . Chinese made. I will try Restoration Supplies. Almost all the wood in the DB will be covered. Nothing showing . Maybe other models will have wood exposed , will probably have to be highlighted. That is a different case. With all due respect to fellow bloggers.

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6 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

I carry a bar of soap in the tool box just for screws. For wood working of course not working on cars.

A bar of soap can also be used to get you home if you have a leaky gas tank.  Just rub it back and forth over the leak.  If the road is not wet one application might last a hundred miles.  If the road is wet it might require re-soaping in fifty miles.

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I had a motor rebuilder apologetically install cheap, imported cotter pins who's tails were excessively long on castellated connecting rod nuts. The long, bent-over tails vibrated as the motor ran and started breaking off. Fortunately, I caught the problem before damage occured, but many of the nuts had lost both tails. Several also lost the cotter pin heads as well as the tails! 

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5 hours ago, Batwing-eight said:

I had a motor rebuilder apologetically install cheap, imported cotter pins who's tails were excessively long on castellated connecting rod nuts. The long, bent-over tails vibrated as the motor ran and started breaking off. Fortunately, I caught the problem before damage occured, but many of the nuts had lost both tails. Several also lost the cotter pin heads as well as the tails! 

 

My thoughts on your experience are that your engine rebuilder was using too small  a diameter pin and should invest in a good pair of side  cutters to cut off the excess length.

  • Thanks 2

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I always adjust cotter pin length when it is excessive. And if the diameter was not right on a rotating part.... get the right ones! Geesh....😵

  • Haha 1

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