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Gen1 bleeder valve


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I wanted to bleed my brakes on my 64 and snap both bleeders on the passenger side. The driver side came out OK.

Grasping at straws, but are by any chance are the bleeders reverse thread on passenger side?

The manual does not mention it but even with a lot of PB blaster and tapping it, it still will not budge.

 

Thank You

Carl

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NO, but I usually add them. Makes it easier when the time comes for any bleeding in the future as it keeps water, etc. out.

As an added precaution I will also use anti-seize upon initial installation.

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On 8/29/2019 at 10:06 PM, telriv said:

NO, but I usually add them. Makes it easier when the time comes for any bleeding in the future as it keeps water, etc. out.

As an added precaution I will also use anti-seize upon initial installation.

 

Thanks.  I've often installed oil-resistant (yellow) thread tape to the nipples to make vacuum bleeding more efficient; it prevents the MitiVac from sucking air past the threads.

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The bleeders did not have caps. 

Replaced the 2 wheel cylinders that I broke the bleeders on. Also going to replace the other bleeders in the cylinders not replaced. I thought about using anti-seize to all bleeders. Is that the same anti-seize use on spark plugs? Also do you use caps that cover only the top or ones that go further down?

 

Also, while I am working on the brakes, I am replacing the rubber hoses too. FYI, I ordered some from Autozone (PN 88204) and they turned out to be too short and the ends are wrong causing them not to seal. I took them back and they use the same P/N on 63-66 MY, so beware.

 

Thanks for the feedback

Carl

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Yes, the same although I personally like the copper colored one as opposed to the silver.  Use Anti-Seize on ALL the bleeders both old & new after removing.  Then install the caps.. ALL the caps are is a little rubber cup that fits over the end of the bleeder nipple.  They can be found at most auto parts stores.

 

Tom T.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Having a problem with my brakes. With engine running, the pedal goes almost to the floorboard before any noticeable breaking happens.

Here is want I have done:

1) Because of broken bleeders or leaking wheel cylinders, I have replaced all cylinders except Left/Rear.

2) New brake shoes in the front. Rear still look good.

3) Replace all brake hoses front and rear. Still using original steel lines

4) Adjusted shoe to just prior to making contact with drums before bleeding

5) Flushed and bled the lines with new fluid. I used the sequence in the service manual (Right/front, left/front, Right/rear and left/rear)

6) Had problems with front/right hose leaking at coperwasher/seal. Used thicker (1/6 vs 1/32) and that seem to correct it. Re-bled that side since I had it capped while fixing the leak. Only minimal amount of air came out when I did this time and the brake pedal did not feel spongy or fading so I did not bleed the others.

 

With my other vehicles, I always bled lines starting with the furthest from the master cylinder (in most cases Right/rear). It should not matter but how do others do it?

I took it out and broke hard( pedal almost to the floor) and the right rear lock up but no others. I am starting to think it may be the master cylinder but with the engine off I can only push down halfway to the floor board so it is a little confusing to me. Not sure how to test master cylinder only.

Any suggestions would be appreciated?

 

Thanks

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If it's the original master, definitely pull it and have a look at the internals.  It's not unknown for the piston/bore to corrode and degrade.  When you put it back on, give serious consideration to upgrading to a dual master.  

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5 minutes ago, KongaMan said:

If it's the original master, definitely pull it and have a look at the internals.  It's not unknown for the piston/bore to corrode and degrade.  When you put it back on, give serious consideration to upgrading to a dual master.  

It is not the original one. It was replace about 3K miles ago BUT.....that was in 95.

Not to disagree with you but if I had corrosion, shouldn't it be apparent without power brake (engine not running). I would expect the pedal to go down further than half. 

 

Just building a barn and putting a lift in next spring. Was hoping I would get lucky and than convert to dual master then.

From prior posts, as long as my power booster is good, I could use a 67 master cylinder, running one of the reservoirs straight to the rear brakes and the other to the front blocks. 

I think Ed did this. Is this the correct way?

 

Thanks

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I went back out and tested the brakes. Before starting the engine pressed down on the brakes and it stop about 2 inches from the floor board and then started the engine, The brake went down another 1/2 inch to a hard stop. That is where the hard braking starts.

 

Would you still think the booster and master cylinder need to be replaced.

 

Thanks for all the input.

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29 minutes ago, steelman said:

If you depress the brake pedal with the engine off, hold it down and start the engine, all you have changed is the vacuum to the booster. I had this same problem. Fix the booster. Check valve is leaking/not holding vacuum.

Will do.

 

Thanks for everyone's help

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The booster is not designed to hold vacuum indefinitely.  If all vacuum has been discharged from the booster (e.g. if you've depressed the brake pedal several times with the engine off), it is normal for the pedal to go down further when the engine is started.

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35 minutes ago, KongaMan said:

The booster is not designed to hold vacuum indefinitely.  If all vacuum has been discharged from the booster (e.g. if you've depressed the brake pedal several times with the engine off), it is normal for the pedal to go down further when the engine is started.

 

I honestly don't know how many times I pressed the brake pedal because I was also working on the brake lights to get both working. I know I pressed them a couple of times but cannot recall what the travel was. 

I will try tomorrow.

 

Thanks for the feedback. This forum is a big help. 

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Chip,

 

    Unfortunately I must dis-agree.   I pulled the disc brakes off a '70 Estate wagon.   When it was time to use the parts MANY yrs. later I removed the check valve in the booster & the old sound of air rushing in was VERY apparent.  I couldn't believe myself that all the many yrs. later it held vacuum for that amount of time.,,  I have a '64 Riv. in my side yard that I use for testing when I rebuild carbs. & distributors.   After sitting all winter, approx. 6 months it always has vacuum in the booster.  I'm totally surprised that it can hold vacuum for so long.

I know that the '70 & '64 boosters are original to the cars.  Not saying how long they would last IF used on a daily basis.

Says something for original factory parts.

 

Tom T.

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Checked  the power booster and sure enough, after about 2 minutes without depressing the pedal, the booster loses vacuum. Pulled the check valve and it is still good so it must be an internal leak. So it looks like I need a new one. Looked at some boosters from local parts store but the check valve port comes out at a 90 deg angle. Mine (which matches the service manual picture) comes straight out. I assume it is the original booster and like the way it connects while maintaining the stock look. I will call Dewey Booster tomorrow but would prefer buying from an auto parts store and save some money. 

I plan on converting to a 67 dual master next year but do you guys know if the 64 booster is compatible with the 67 booster? 

 

Thanks

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I installed front Disc brakes from a '70 Estate wagon on my '64 Riv. back in the early 80's sometime. The '70 master bolted right up to the '64 booster.  Problem was the '64 booster rod, altho adjustable, wasn't adjustable enough. The pin was too long by a good amount. The problem is to remove the pin in the middle of the booster is NOT like most. The booster has to come entirely apart to access the pin. For me it wasn't too hard to take apart, BUT it is a PIA.  This is the time where you measure sixteen times & cut once.  NO SECOND CHANCES.

My '64 & three other parts cars I have come out on straight out. I know for sure my '64 is original as I have NEVER replaced it & I've had the car since new.

Why don't you just get a used one that works for now until you finally do the swap over???

 

Tom T.

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