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mickthecat

FS: Beaver 2 Cylinder Opposed Engine c. 1905

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For Sale: 2 Cylinder Beaver Engine, from a horseless carriage probably ca. 1905. From the California desert. It is stuck, of course. There is some moisture damage to the internals but don't think its real bad - I've seen a lot worse. Not a lot of wear on the internal parts either. Low serial number (in the 300's) so obviously this is a real early one. Asking $800. Buyer to arrange shipping. Thanks for looking.

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From The Standard Catalog: "The Beaver Manufacturing Company of Milwaukee was a prominent producer of gasoline engines for the automotive industry. In 1905, the company installed one of its engines in a motor vehicle, but this was strictly for demonstration purposes and the firm did not proceed into automobile manufacture."

 

Anyone know what cars used the Beaver engines? 

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Nice looking engine.  Does anyone have access to any original Beaver literature to verify the dating suggested.  What would be the bore, stroke and HP rating?

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Posted (edited)

A quick search found not a whole lot on Beaver motors. However, they did market a fairly complete line and 

apparently offered motors to the marine trade as well including two cylinder opposed units. The latest I could

find (again this was a quick search) for the opposed engines was 1910 (factory ad). However, there was one advertisement by a equipment

supplier offering a "band new" two cylinder opposed Beaver motor in 1915. However, there is no way of determining if 

the "brand new" motor was indeed of recent manufacture or if it was new/old stock.

 

According to the advertisement they offered several sizes of the opposed motor: 4-3/8"x4",  4-3/4"x4" and 5-1/8"x4-1/2". They also offered a four cylinder opposed.

as well as a 6 cylinder vertical and a 4 cylinder vertical.

 

Beaver was still advertising thier marine engines as late as 1925 - at that time it was an valve-in-head four cylinder with  4-3/4x6 bore/stroke.

 

Very neat survivor! 

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)

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I'm guessing by looking at the mounting brackets and locations of the plugs that it was transversely mounted, as were the engines on early 2-cylinder Fords and Buicks, unlike the Schacht highwheelers which were longitudinally mounted. 

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Unless there were other physical artifacts tying to a horseless carriage it could have also been used as a power plant for farm

or industrial application. Beaver did indeed offer their motors for industrial/farm use and at least some models

were used in a few early tractors. That's not to belittle what you have because again, its a interesting survivor

that looks to be in good restorable condition.

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Hi I'm interested in the engine, where is it located?  I'm in Indiana and my # 2197663335 Thanks, Steve

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8 hours ago, mickthecat said:

I'm guessing by looking at the mounting brackets and locations of the plugs that it was transversely mounted, as were the engines on early 2-cylinder Fords and Buicks, unlike the Schacht highwheelers which were longitudinally mounted. 

The Schacht Model B Surry and Model R 2-cylinder engines are mounted longitudinal in the front of the car. The Schacht Model K 2-cylinder engine is mounted transverse in the rear of the car. 

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I hope it finds a caring home.  (it being the Beaver engine)

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Posted (edited)

If I did not have too many projects going, I would buy it just for the challenge of making it run but it is not be be.  Good luck to the engine hopefully finding a good home.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)

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