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11 hours ago, oldcar said:

Re The above photograph how many of the people looking at this know what they are looking at and how it works?

 

BJ.

 

Don't know for certain what I'm looking at, but thinking that the ENV has different bolt pattern around the outer edge, I'm going to guess that this is a picture of the Wilson from the Lagonda with the front cover and clutching removed. 

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13 hours ago, oldcar said:

Re The above photograph how many of the people looking at this know what they are looking at and how it works?

 

BJ.

Looks like a flywheel and starter nose gear to me Bernie....But I'm just a half a$$ed backyard mechanic.  😁

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13 hours ago, oldcar said:

Re The above photograph how many of the people looking at this know what they are looking at and how it works?

 

BJ.

dupe

Edited by Frank Tate (see edit history)

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13 hours ago, oldcar said:

Re The above photograph how many of the people looking at this know what they are looking at and how it works?

 

BJ.

Triple...sorry

Edited by Frank Tate (see edit history)

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Hello Frank

Thank you for going to the trouble of replying and at least expressing your thoughts.

What you are looking at is the Rapier flywheel with what is generally known as a Drive Plate or a Flex Plate attached to it. This has a splined hub in the centre which fits the input shaft of the gearbox. This Drive plate provides a continuous drive to the gearbox which means that if the car is stationary for any time Neutral must be selected. 

When starting from a stop the drive is taken up by the friction lining on first gear "Brake band".  Each of the intermediate gears including reverse has a similar arrangement. Top gear is actually a form of cone clutch. This drives directly through the gearbox. To fully understand this you need to understand the workings of the gearbox. Not all that different to some early automatic transmissions except that each gear is selected manually. This type of gearbox is also known as an epicyclic transmission.

 

Bj.

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Hello Digger

I am sorry that I missed your comment earlier, the photograph is actually looking at the rear the motor. Todays photograph shows the gearbox together with the "clutch housing" but with the top of the gearbox yet to be fitted. The linkage at the front of the gearbox is for the gear selector (remote control) which forms part of the gearbox top. The Gearchange pedal (Clutch) can  ben seen with the rod going to the actuating lever at the rear of the right hand side of the gearbox. The speedo drive can be clearly seen above this as can the oil filler plug. There is a "dip stick" attached to the underside of the filler plug. Looking into the gearbox you can see the adjustment for each gear. The reverse gear adjuster at the rear of the"box" is hidden from view.  

The ragged hole at the end of the starter pinion cover is an old "battle scar".

The second photograph is a close up view looking into the top of the gearbox showing the self adjustment arrangement with the wedge adjusters etc. 

Considering that this was a pre -1920 design it shows the advanced thinking on the part of Major Wilson.

The last two photographs show the gearbox with the top in place the first of these clearly show the gear change lever and at the front the lever and pull rod going to the front of the gearbox. The last photograph shows the passenger side view with the  carpet and trim in place.

There is still one unexplained piece of the action. I will let you have a think about this?

 

Bj.

 

DSCN6643.thumb.jpg.4e7f16853e40d5933750f266d858a3dd.jpg

DSCN6626.thumb.jpg.9e64ba21f4f3ebb59ee3ab80875a66e3.jpg

DSCN6644.thumb.jpg.a991a0cda0778cb6ff03c3e9f33af43b.jpgDSCN6646.thumb.jpg.5950426bfd343b21f3c5b84acda5580e.jpg

 

 

 

 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Hi Bernie,

Not quite sure what I should be pondering here as I had to expand my image view to 400% to see what the "old battle scar" looked like. The shift / gear select lever assembly looks like the EMV type 57? assembly so it might be the bolts on the side that might be the un explained adjustment points, or it could be whats viable through the open inspection cover which would be the big brake /cone  clutch and all the little brake/clutch bands. 

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Hi Digger  The Battle scar is the ragged round hole in the end of the starter pinion housing. This is where the starter pinion came out following a "back-fire" the result of too much spark advance combined with the then 12:1 compression ratio.

Go back to the third of the four photographs, There is a pair of bevel gears one attached to be bottom of the gear lever. This rotates on the through bolt, the other is mounted on the end of the long shaft that runs through the  length of the "remote control" housing  with the lever actuating the pull rod linked to an arm on the front. The pull rod in turn rotates the gear selection cam inside the box.  The good part of all this is that the gear selection is instantaneous. Having pre-selected the required gear all the driver has to do is to push down and release the gear-change pedal. 

 

Bj.

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Sorry! I guess that was just a we bit too complicated for most of the people looking at this.

Todays photograph shows not my new gear change pull rod but the one supplied by "The Worlds Greatest Expert on Pre-select Gear boxes".

No Names; No Pack-drill; but let us just say he lives and works in one of the major countries in Europe. He certainly knows how to charge for his services.

The fancy curls in the split pin are just one of his signature pieces.  

Oops! I hope that I did not go too far just then, I don't want to be facing any more threats of "Legal Action!"

 

Bj.

 

Bj.DSCN6638.thumb.jpg.65eaf5414de23034ee454b5ddaf57151.jpg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Attached is a photograph of my replacement pull rod. I have since had to grind off the nut that I had so carefully brazed onto the centre of the rod. In use it prooved superfluous and tended to get caught on the binding on the edge of the carpet.

 

Bj.

DSCN6639.jpg

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DSCN6653.thumb.jpg.16fdc3d3c243da5d163bd530aa06bc2b.jpg

 

I really do just about give up.. How many of the people looking at this can tell me what they are looking at and what they can see?  We all know that it is an engine but there is so much more. Ok, Yes  most of us can read that it is a Lagonda . AND yes I am sorry but it has nothing to do with Singers except that it was made in England in 1934..

 

Bj.

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Ok Ok!

I get the message you are all bored with engine stuff, the cheapest little Korean buzz box has twin overhead cams these days. 

Now for something new. I have just made the first steps towards making the panels for the Singer's body. Believe it or not, that is your choice, what you are seeing here is the right hand side.

Look away now unless you have a strong constitution. I have had those "snips" for over 50 years and they are still the pair I automatically reach for.  Next thing I have to do is to undo the eight nuts and bolts that hold the body frame onto the chassis. The real test is if I can lift it off in one piece single handed.

Bj

 

DSCN6654.thumb.jpg.72257a3a0343c217bdd11db0a28aa21c.jpg

 

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2 hours ago, oldcar said:

the cheapest little Korean buzz box has twin overhead cams these days

But the twin constant velocity side draft carbs are still a balance challenge that few have mastered. And, you probably can get the body off in one piece single handedly , but do you really want to?

 

 

 

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Hi Digger,

It is not really a question of "want to" ?

To progress to the next stage it is really a quite simple, "have to"!

Of course there are those who would question the "need to" 

But we could go on for ever finding excuses for "not doing anything".

It is probably, at least to some peoples thinking, very sad that some of us "have no say in it."

It is just that we are "driven to do something every day".

There are times when I wish that I too could simply shut the door, find a comfortable chair, 

and sit and read all day.

Of course and I hope very sincerely, "that this never happens to me",

there are those who "just sit ! "

Very often with people, like me, who have lived their "Three score years & ten "  

are just "waiting to die".

"What for ?".

I hope that this is not "too deep" for you.

Could it be just a case of "You have dug your hole, now lie in it"?

 

BACK TO WORK!

 

Oh yes! "Don't forget to smile!"

 

"You don't have to be mad, but it helps!"

 

Bernie j.

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