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$29,995

1953 Singer 4AD

Classic Cars Ltd.
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14 California Ave Ste A
Pleasanton, CA 94566
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(925) 846-1451

 

Seller's Description
HISTORYSinger Motors Limited was a British motor vehicle manufacturing business, originally a bicycle manufacturer founded as Singer & Company by George Singer in 1874 in Coventry England. from 1901 George Singerss Singer Motor Company made cars and commercial vehicles.Singer Motor Company was the first automobile manufacturer to make a small economy car that was a replica of a large car demonstrating that a small car was a practical proposition. It was much more sturdily built than other similar cyclecars at the time. Singer continued to produce cars until 19 56 when the business was acquired by The Roots group which continue the brand until 1970. A few years later Roots was acquired by Chrysler corporation.The Singer 4AD was one of the last offerings from the original Singer company.  The 4AD had its origin before the second world war and the body style changed little since that time. An Ash frame with aluminum skin makes up the body tub and doors while the fenders, running boards and hood are steel. In keeping with bespoke technology some of the floorboards are wood. The car is supported by a substantial “U” section pressed steel chassis that is well triangulated and reinforced to carry the independent front suspension. The rear suspension is a more traditional live axle, mounted on semi elliptical springs.This particular Singer 4AD was acquired by the current owner and British car collector in 2013 from the restorer who completed a comprehensive frame off restoration of the Singer.  The Singer, along with a 1955 MG Magnette and a 1952 MGTD are also available due to the current owners inability to drive any longer.  The fascinating and extensive history, contained in a large binder, includes articles about the cars restoration and history written by the owner in Victoria B.C.  The SInger was located in Canada where it was reportedly originally exported from the UK.  The car was completely disassembled and while the car was fairly complete, some parts were missing and thanks to assistance from the Singer club were located for the restoration of the 4AD.  Photos contained in the large binder and article(s) written on the restoration of the car support that it received a true “nut & bolt” restoration.  This included, but was not limited to the following:Repairing and refinishing the ash frame as requiredReshaping the aluminum panels, straightening and repairing as necessaryPreparing the body panels for paintShimming and aligning all doorsLocating proper hood panels and restoring ensuring proper fit and closureComplete refurbishment of mechanical components including suspension, braking system, cooling system, engine & transmissionNew or restored fuel system componentsInstalling a refurbished Austin A70 engine & gearbox (same dimensions and displacement) – Mounted to original existing frame holesNew electrical system, restore gauges, switches, etc.Two-tone paint using acrylic enamel in Alfa ROmeo Red / Cirrus Gray (Paint Codes in file)All new upholstery, carpet, tonneau coverDECODING THE NUMBERSThe brass plate located in the engine compartment is L4AD2577W identifying the Singer as a car that was produced in 1953 as one of 906 cars manufactured in 1953Above the tool bx is the # 4AD2577L , the Body NumberThe Singer is fitted with engine # 15AA-U-H 3528Gearbox A 5462The Singer comes complete with considerable information on the cars restoration, receipts, manuals, Singer articles and other items including:Original Singer Roadster Owner Handbook (Excellent condition )Repair invoices / receiptsCarburetion Supplement to Owner’s ManualLubrication chart for Left Hand Drive ModelsCopy of a Singer Manual published in the UKSinger AdvertisementList of NASOC (North American SInger Car Owners Club) members with names, addresses, telephone numbers, etc.Article on the 1953-1954 Singer 4Ad from Motor Trader (UK)Wiring DiagramTechnical DataComplete Ca

 

Singer.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...

Unknown-2.jpeg.084a069f5fe1a3c707f73050901f2d5a.jpeg

 

I wonder how many people realise that in 1947/8 Singer 9hp were just a few  UK Pounds CHEAPER than an English Ford 8hp "Anglia" tourer.

 

 

At least the Singers by the 1950s had abandoned the Pre-war three speed gearbox for a four speed which I suppose gave them some advantage. Please do not get me wrong, I have owned quite a number of Singers albeit mainly Pre-War (Before 19390) but only one Ford Anglia and that was a 1950s 100E.

Anyone wondering, you can own quite a munber of cars in 83 years! I owned my first car at age 16.

Please do not ask how many cars in total I have owned, I gave up counting about 50 years ago.

Photographed (below) are two of my 1926/7 Singer 8hp.443508551_Bodyprofile817.thumb.jpg.1ded93d9b6f4ea85b48040552ef1681c.jpg1532145216_Singer8hp_809.thumb.jpg.86839d2ebf8b490a507685918b13618b.jpg

 

Bj.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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  • 3 months later...
5 hours ago, oldcar said:

The big question is does anyone care?

 

If you haven't seen it, there is a little quip in the general section where people noticed, with speculations, that you pulled your postings and the forever loss of the years of accumulated knowledge. 

 

For my own sentimental reasons. I followed your Rapier postings. I'm very glad to see you back and now that you are back,  your Singer postings will be linked to my email.  Also relieved to learn that you, your home and cars are still intact.

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Hello Digger

Thank you for your support.

The Lagonda is now finally home after it's disastrous "holliday" in the UK and France. I have now had a chance to look at the "adjustment" of the gearbox in the calm of my "garage".  It now seems to be driving in top gear so I have hopefully avoided the tast of removing the "box" and dismantling it. The one unexpected extra task has been to remove and dismantle the hand brake lever. This along with most MG's and many other  quality British Sports Cars, is a "Fly Off, in contrast to most common or garden "other cars. This means that when driving in "Sports mode" the hand brake can be applied by simply lifting the lever to momentarily slow the car. When parking etc the hand brake is used to hold the car it is "set" by lifting the lever and then pressing in the "ratchet button" . To release the hand brake all that is then required is very slightly lift the lever.

In the past I have always left a "notice" attached

 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Hello Digger

Thank you for your support.

The Lagonda is now finally home after it's disastrous "holliday" in the UK and France. I have now had a chance to look at the "adjustment" of the gearbox in the calm of my "garage".  It now seems to be driving in top gear so I have hopefully avoided the tast of removing the "box" and dismantling it. The one unexpected extra task has been to remove and dismantle the hand brake lever. This along with most MG's and many other  quality British Sports Cars, is a "Fly Off, in contrast to most common or garden "other cars. This means that when driving in "Sports mode" the hand brake can be applied by simply lifting the lever to momentarily slow the car. When parking etc the hand brake is used to hold the car it is "set" by lifting the lever and then pressing in the "ratchet button" . To release the hand brake all that is then required is very slightly lift the lever.

In the past I have always left a "notice" attached to the steering wheel explaining the differences with both the gear change and the hand brake. Each time I have ben advised that this was not necessary. Now for the first time I had negelected to do this, the ratchet on the hand brake has been "forced" by someone with more muscles that brains. 

OK! I know my way around the car and it took only 2 or 3 hours to remove the hand brake mechanism, strip it down, repair (weld) the tip on the ratchet and put it back together again.

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Now I am sure that you will all agree that this my fault, by wanting to own something a little different, it is no one's fault but my own. 

If you are even a little unsure about this ask anyone that you may meet in the street.

 

Bj.

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Hi Bernie,

 

Glad to hear that the Lagonda is no longer a shiftless old car. When the second half of your posting popped up I was in the process of writing about my familiarity with the hand brake and that I am quite sure that there is nothing I can say about how it works, or what you can do with it while sport driving that you don't already know. and I now see that you have handled the hand brake.

 

Fault or human trait, everyone likes to have something special, or a little different than everything that everyone else has and notes don't override force of habit or stop people from making mistakes. 

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Most of us have very limited time left, and many have health issues to deal with for the duration. Fault, blame, hey : let's just get on with enjoying what we can, and the friends we have left here and elsewhere. Glad to see you back, Bernie !    -   Carl 

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Hello Carl

You are quite right about many of the issues that you mention. Being a 1936 model I am very aware of this which makes it more important that I keep our Rapier going and perhaps why I was so disappointed that what was to be our last trip to the UK and Europe was cut short.  Having said that I know that we are far more fortunate than many. BUT, there were just two people who really made it all possible. One the Driver/mechanic the other the Navigator who planned all our trips and so successfully kept us on the "right" roads.. 

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No prizes for guessing what is going on here. 
For those not familiar with preselect gearboxes,Top-gear is controlled by the adjustment furthest from the camera. That there is no thread visible in the "thimble nut"  indicates that the friction lining for that gear is completely worn out. Hardly what you would expect for a lining that was replaced less than 500 miles ago, at a cost of Euro 215.   Oh well!  I will know more when I have removed the gearbox from the car and dismantled "top gear".

Don't go away, the gearbox is ready to come out and it will take less than an hour to remove the front cover and extract "Top gear" (Actually a cone clutch.)

This first photograph is of a "spare" top gear cone that I have on the shelf. This is the one that will probably now go into the gear box.DSCN6627.thumb.jpg.f059b0e8efc912e92ded065156697167.jpg

 

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20 years ago I was completely stumped by the name of a tool that the shop manual said I needed to remove the windscreen on a 75 MGB. Long story short, I couldn't even order the tool as the internet wasn't as useful back then and finding someone who knew that a 5/8 bent ring spanner was an offset box end wrench took considerably longer than it would today.

 

Thanks for the picture and to paraphrase Shakespeare - a rose is a rose.. Now that I have seen a "cone clutch", I know what it is. Couldn't remember who it was that wrote about Britain and America being "Two Nations Divided by a Common Language"  and Google gave me several variants of the statement that could have started with Shaw, Now that I know what a cone clutch is I have one more word for UK to English / English lexicon.

Edited by Digger914 (see edit history)
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Bernie,

 

Welcome back and I am glad that things are getting sorted on your Lagonda Raper.    I am fascinated by the concept of the "pre-seIector" gearbox. I certainly hope you will continue to post about the Lagonda as well as your current (and future) restoration projects.  They are some of the best reads on any of the car forums that I belong to and I very much enjoy your wit and style.

 

Best regards,

 

Dr Data

1950 MG TD...currently undergoing engine rebuild...sigh...

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Thank you Dr Data

I currently have the gearbox out sorting out some of the recent mysterious "repairs" and hopefully returning it to full operational health. 

For instance I have never considered dollops of silastic as serious attempts to overcome stripped threads.

But then I have never published a pretty picture book either.

 

Bj

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4 hours ago, oldcar said:

Thank you Dr Data

I currently have the gearbox out sorting out some of the recent mysterious "repairs" and hopefully returning it to full operational health. 

For instance I have never considered dollops of silastic as serious attempts to overcome stripped threads.

But then I have never published a pretty picture book either.

 

Bj

 

Silicone on stripped threads is a lot better than the kind of problem I had imagined could be found if someone couldn't resist taking the sports car for a test drive and used the shift pedal like a clutch to get rolling and the new clutch material was an aggressive abrasive..

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Thank you Digger 914

I am not sure where you are comming from but as with all things, it is important that you enjoy the trip.

Unfortunately Preselect transmissions are one of the most basic and one of the most misunderstood.

 

In 1914 (WW1) Major Wilson designed a new type of transmision that even the most raw recruits, men that had never before driven anything more complicated than a horse and cart , could sit in the drivers seat of a tank and drive it.   This was the start of what was to become the Preselect Gearbox.

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In addition to Wilson the other main suppliers of Preselect Gearboxes was ENV.

Again there is no mystery about the three letter name. If fact it is French, the company being early in the business of cutting gears. 

They were pioneer's in cutting "Double Helical gears", the name referring to this, the English translation, being "in V"   So no mystery there!

Andre Citroen was also an early participant in the Gear Cutting industry. His double chevron trade mark is another reference to double helical gears.

Life around early motor cars is actually very simple. It is only people with misguided imaginations and visions of self importance who like to give a different impression.

 

Bj.

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11 hours ago, oldcar said:

Thank you Digger 914

I am not sure where you are comming from but as with all things, it is important that you enjoy the trip.

Unfortunately Preselect transmissions are one of the most basic and one of the most misunderstood.

 

In 1914 (WW1) Major Wilson designed a new type of transmision that even the most raw recruits, men that had never before driven anything more complicated than a horse and cart , could sit in the drivers seat of a tank and drive it.   This was the start of what was to become the Preselect Gearbox.

 

Bernie,

 

Half of my dads cousins had small town new car dealerships, my dad ran a big city Lincoln store and another one of his cousin ran the Cadillac store directly across the road.. Growing up on the used car lot in a new car family.and having succumbed to this temptation myself, I know the kind of things that can happen to new and used specialty cars that people can't resist driving. 

 

Those old preselect trannys might be a pain in stop and go city driving, but they are a  pure joy on windy hilly roads and thinking about it always puts a smile on my face. 

 

 

 

 

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To achieve much the same effect my 1935 Singer 11hp went just slightly over-board.

It has a fluid flywheel and a twin plate clutch driving through a synchro-mesh gearbox with a "free-wheel" attachment added said to give the driver to change gear without using the clutch. BUT you still needed the clutch to start.

"Clutch" what's that?

 

DSCN6640.thumb.jpg.92f8a2362f7a411a9840d3fccb45f872.jpg

 

Bj 

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11 hours ago, oldcar said:

Re The above photograph how many of the people looking at this know what they are looking at and how it works?

 

BJ.

 

Don't know for certain what I'm looking at, but thinking that the ENV has different bolt pattern around the outer edge, I'm going to guess that this is a picture of the Wilson from the Lagonda with the front cover and clutching removed. 

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13 hours ago, oldcar said:

Re The above photograph how many of the people looking at this know what they are looking at and how it works?

 

BJ.

Looks like a flywheel and starter nose gear to me Bernie....But I'm just a half a$$ed backyard mechanic.  😁

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Hello Frank

Thank you for going to the trouble of replying and at least expressing your thoughts.

What you are looking at is the Rapier flywheel with what is generally known as a Drive Plate or a Flex Plate attached to it. This has a splined hub in the centre which fits the input shaft of the gearbox. This Drive plate provides a continuous drive to the gearbox which means that if the car is stationary for any time Neutral must be selected. 

When starting from a stop the drive is taken up by the friction lining on first gear "Brake band".  Each of the intermediate gears including reverse has a similar arrangement. Top gear is actually a form of cone clutch. This drives directly through the gearbox. To fully understand this you need to understand the workings of the gearbox. Not all that different to some early automatic transmissions except that each gear is selected manually. This type of gearbox is also known as an epicyclic transmission.

 

Bj.

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Hello Digger

I am sorry that I missed your comment earlier, the photograph is actually looking at the rear the motor. Todays photograph shows the gearbox together with the "clutch housing" but with the top of the gearbox yet to be fitted. The linkage at the front of the gearbox is for the gear selector (remote control) which forms part of the gearbox top. The Gearchange pedal (Clutch) can  ben seen with the rod going to the actuating lever at the rear of the right hand side of the gearbox. The speedo drive can be clearly seen above this as can the oil filler plug. There is a "dip stick" attached to the underside of the filler plug. Looking into the gearbox you can see the adjustment for each gear. The reverse gear adjuster at the rear of the"box" is hidden from view.  

The ragged hole at the end of the starter pinion cover is an old "battle scar".

The second photograph is a close up view looking into the top of the gearbox showing the self adjustment arrangement with the wedge adjusters etc. 

Considering that this was a pre -1920 design it shows the advanced thinking on the part of Major Wilson.

The last two photographs show the gearbox with the top in place the first of these clearly show the gear change lever and at the front the lever and pull rod going to the front of the gearbox. The last photograph shows the passenger side view with the  carpet and trim in place.

There is still one unexplained piece of the action. I will let you have a think about this?

 

Bj.

 

DSCN6643.thumb.jpg.4e7f16853e40d5933750f266d858a3dd.jpg

DSCN6626.thumb.jpg.9e64ba21f4f3ebb59ee3ab80875a66e3.jpg

DSCN6644.thumb.jpg.a991a0cda0778cb6ff03c3e9f33af43b.jpgDSCN6646.thumb.jpg.5950426bfd343b21f3c5b84acda5580e.jpg

 

 

 

 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Hi Bernie,

Not quite sure what I should be pondering here as I had to expand my image view to 400% to see what the "old battle scar" looked like. The shift / gear select lever assembly looks like the EMV type 57? assembly so it might be the bolts on the side that might be the un explained adjustment points, or it could be whats viable through the open inspection cover which would be the big brake /cone  clutch and all the little brake/clutch bands. 

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Hi Digger  The Battle scar is the ragged round hole in the end of the starter pinion housing. This is where the starter pinion came out following a "back-fire" the result of too much spark advance combined with the then 12:1 compression ratio.

Go back to the third of the four photographs, There is a pair of bevel gears one attached to be bottom of the gear lever. This rotates on the through bolt, the other is mounted on the end of the long shaft that runs through the  length of the "remote control" housing  with the lever actuating the pull rod linked to an arm on the front. The pull rod in turn rotates the gear selection cam inside the box.  The good part of all this is that the gear selection is instantaneous. Having pre-selected the required gear all the driver has to do is to push down and release the gear-change pedal. 

 

Bj.

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Sorry! I guess that was just a we bit too complicated for most of the people looking at this.

Todays photograph shows not my new gear change pull rod but the one supplied by "The Worlds Greatest Expert on Pre-select Gear boxes".

No Names; No Pack-drill; but let us just say he lives and works in one of the major countries in Europe. He certainly knows how to charge for his services.

The fancy curls in the split pin are just one of his signature pieces.  

Oops! I hope that I did not go too far just then, I don't want to be facing any more threats of "Legal Action!"

 

Bj.

 

Bj.DSCN6638.thumb.jpg.65eaf5414de23034ee454b5ddaf57151.jpg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Attached is a photograph of my replacement pull rod. I have since had to grind off the nut that I had so carefully brazed onto the centre of the rod. In use it prooved superfluous and tended to get caught on the binding on the edge of the carpet.

 

Bj.

DSCN6639.jpg

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DSCN6653.thumb.jpg.16fdc3d3c243da5d163bd530aa06bc2b.jpg

 

I really do just about give up.. How many of the people looking at this can tell me what they are looking at and what they can see?  We all know that it is an engine but there is so much more. Ok, Yes  most of us can read that it is a Lagonda . AND yes I am sorry but it has nothing to do with Singers except that it was made in England in 1934..

 

Bj.

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Ok Ok!

I get the message you are all bored with engine stuff, the cheapest little Korean buzz box has twin overhead cams these days. 

Now for something new. I have just made the first steps towards making the panels for the Singer's body. Believe it or not, that is your choice, what you are seeing here is the right hand side.

Look away now unless you have a strong constitution. I have had those "snips" for over 50 years and they are still the pair I automatically reach for.  Next thing I have to do is to undo the eight nuts and bolts that hold the body frame onto the chassis. The real test is if I can lift it off in one piece single handed.

Bj

 

DSCN6654.thumb.jpg.72257a3a0343c217bdd11db0a28aa21c.jpg

 

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2 hours ago, oldcar said:

the cheapest little Korean buzz box has twin overhead cams these days

But the twin constant velocity side draft carbs are still a balance challenge that few have mastered. And, you probably can get the body off in one piece single handedly , but do you really want to?

 

 

 

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Hi Digger,

It is not really a question of "want to" ?

To progress to the next stage it is really a quite simple, "have to"!

Of course there are those who would question the "need to" 

But we could go on for ever finding excuses for "not doing anything".

It is probably, at least to some peoples thinking, very sad that some of us "have no say in it."

It is just that we are "driven to do something every day".

There are times when I wish that I too could simply shut the door, find a comfortable chair, 

and sit and read all day.

Of course and I hope very sincerely, "that this never happens to me",

there are those who "just sit ! "

Very often with people, like me, who have lived their "Three score years & ten "  

are just "waiting to die".

"What for ?".

I hope that this is not "too deep" for you.

Could it be just a case of "You have dug your hole, now lie in it"?

 

BACK TO WORK!

 

Oh yes! "Don't forget to smile!"

 

"You don't have to be mad, but it helps!"

 

Bernie j.

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Not too much work today, 36 degrees C. and we are promised 40.C tomorrow then a cool change with possible rain for the weekend.  That's Melbourne weather. 

I opened the garage door and closed it again. I really don't have to work every day if I don't want to!  The Lagonda is all ready for its next outing. With weather this hot I must do something about the Peugeots Radiator. Next week?  DSCN6656.thumb.jpg.ee4743565f1e19a17fb08cbe18e33d97.jpgDSCN6655.thumb.jpg.d5e36f4a09f48b9456d84e87dd79dc21.jpg

 

Bj

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