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Was working on my turn signal switch and wound up rebuilding the switch. Got it working now but one thing lead to another and since other items like dome lights are not working, I checked the fuse in the fuse block. When I got the door open I found the fuse Block contacts rusted. 

Is saw in other post were acid etch for bare metal was used (I believe it was Seafoam65 brought that up) to clean the contacts.

Did you soak the whole block or just brushed it on?

Is there a particular brand of etch the others have used?

 

I would like to try and fix this one. 

 

Thank You

Carl

 

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Also saw where people have use vinegar and salt to clean the rust then baking soda to naturalize it.

Has any one tried this?

 

Thank You

Carl

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I have tried vinegar, muriatic acid and Evap-O- Rust. All with limited success. The issue even after cleaning the rust off is that there is no longer the tin plating left to protect the fuse clips from further rusting.

 I do a fair amount of work making new harnesses for the '65 Skylark Gran Sports and repairing the dash harnesses and have  found a source for the fuse clips . They can be replaced, but the clips are not available in a retail market and are now  even becoming limited in supply on a wholesale level. Added to all this is cost and minimum order .

 

  Loren

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Evaporust makes great job on such rusty items / problems. But as Loren stated - point is also to prevent it then, from further rusting.

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               I brush the acid etch onto the terminals, let them soak for a little while and then hit them with a wire brush. sometimes you have to repeat

this several times. Of course do this with all the fuses out and the battery disconnected. In my experience the rust does not come back as long as the

original cause of the rust is fixed.......which is water invasion into the interior, usually from a leaking rear window channel. Cars that aren't like a swamp

inside don't ever have this problem. I have several fifty year or older GM cars that have never had this problem, because they've never had water intrusion into the interior.  

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16 hours ago, Ckerch said:

Was working on my turn signal switch and wound up rebuilding the switch. Got it working now but one thing lead to another and since other items like dome lights are not working, I checked the fuse in the fuse block. When I got the door open I found the fuse Block contacts rusted. 

Is saw in other post were acid etch for bare metal was used (I believe it was Seafoam65 brought that up) to clean the contacts.

Did you soak the whole block or just brushed it on?

Is there a particular brand of etch the others have used?

 

I would like to try and fix this one. 

 

Thank You

Carl

 

20190821_194619.jpg

20190821_194814.jpg

You have more issues going on there than just fuse terminals...check the plug at the back of your ignition switch for over-heating/melting also,

Tom Mooney

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Was the acid etch a commercial product or did you use something like vinegar/salt solution or other DIY solution? 

One thing I don't care for is the fact the fuse block are on some what horizontal plane and no drip loop on the electrical lines. Before I retired, I worked in the electrical group at GM and that design would never fly in today's vehicle. Condensation from the from above could easily drip right on the fuses. Because I just got the Riviera, I don't have any background on it's environmental conditions but it does get humid in the summer months here in Michigan with lots of condensation in the mornings. Might also look at changing the orientation, if possible.

 

 I was worried about, the rust eating some of the plating off, so after cleaning/removing rust, I would apply some dielectric grease on the terminals. I know that helps with corrosion but not to sure about it being a rust preventer. My thought is , it couldn't help.

 

Anything has to be better than what I have now.

 

Thanks for the inputs

Carl

 

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I saw that.

I will have to track that wire down and see what it goes to. I have a couple of electrical gremlins going on. Horn, power vents, none of the dome lights and of course the air does not work but that may be the refrigerant.

Thanks for the tip on the ignition switch, will add that to the list of things to check.

 

Carl

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37 minutes ago, Ckerch said:

I saw that.

I will have to track that wire down and see what it goes to. I have a couple of electrical gremlins going on. Horn, power vents, none of the dome lights and of course the air does not work but that may be the refrigerant.

Thanks for the tip on the ignition switch, will add that to the list of things to check.

 

Carl

Your door jamb switches may be the culprit for the dome light issue.  They are notorious for failing but can be rebuilt by an ROA member who advertises in the Riview.

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1 hour ago, 1965rivgs said:

You have more issues going on there than just fuse terminals...check the plug at the back of your ignition switch for over-heating/melting also,

Tom Mooney

 

1 hour ago, Ckerch said:

I saw that.

I will have to track that wire down and see what it goes to. I have a couple of electrical gremlins going on. Horn, power vents, none of the dome lights and of course the air does not work but that may be the refrigerant.

Thanks for the tip on the ignition switch, will add that to the list of things to check.

 

Carl

 

Tom does give very good advice here; I would move checking the ignition switch wires to the top of your list if I were you.

 

The picture below shows what happens if the insulation on the wires melts and they touch each other. Of course, this was after they actually caught on fire. Luckily, I caught it quick enough there wasn't too much damage under the dash.

 

1936730564_IMG_3776(2).thumb.JPG.af0c3165b31b509e0ef2afbca315a9ee.JPG

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Somewhere in the archives of this forum is a thread or a post on running that big red power wire that goes from the ignition swith to the fuse block through a relay. Take the big power out of the ignition switch and run it through a relay. As long as you're in there,  you might think about it.

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8 minutes ago, RivNut said:

Somewhere in the archives of this forum is a thread or a post on running that big red power wire that goes from the ignition swith to the fuse block through a relay. Take the big power out of the ignition switch and run it through a relay. As long as you're in there,  you might think about it.

The switched wire is the brown wire. The red wire supplies battery voltage full time

Tom

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                       The product I use is one for prepping  bare metal for painting.......you can buy the stuff at a supplier of paint and body materials

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50 minutes ago, 1965rivgs said:

The switched wire is the brown wire. The red wire supplies battery voltage full time

Tom

Thanks,  Always count on you to make it right.

Ed

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So this brown must be the feed from the switch.

When running a relay, do you go back to the battery for that feed or do you pull it from the Red wire on the fuse block?

Do you know the current used for brown ignition feed?

If I do go from the battery, is there a good place to get through the fire wall?

 

Thanks

Carl

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I think I lucked out (at least as far as the ignition switch). Felt up there and could not feel any of the connectors melting.

Was able to get a picture of the back.

Are there any other hot spots or known electrical issues I should check for?

 

 

Thanks

Carl

 

20190822_203133.jpg

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This is where the fusible links come into play. Not only protects wiring but ALSO keeps the wiring from catching fire.  I've known quite a few early cars burning because of this.

 

Tom T.

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5 hours ago, telriv said:

This is where the fusible links come into play. Not only protects wiring but ALSO keeps the wiring from catching fire.  I've known quite a few early cars burning because of this.

 

Tom T.

Tom

 

When you talk fusible link, I assume you are installing it on the ignition feed line to a relay controlled by the ignition switch.

Is that correct and what amperage do you use?

 

And thank everyone for the suggestions and insight.

 

Carl

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Carl,

 

    There was a LONG write-up in the Review. Do a search & I'm sure you will find it. Typing with one finger would take me hours.  Your not using any relays although using a relay on the ignition switch lead wire is also good idea. I feel a relay should be at LEAST 30 amps & NOT one of those cheapo plastic relays.  I ALWAYS use the NAPA AR200. It's a continuous duty relay rated at 60 amps used for power seats, windows, door locks.  IF you go to Advanced, Auto Zone or one of those other company's & have them cross over the number they ALL come up, BUT it's a 20/30 amp cheapo replacement.

 

Tom T.

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Your's is almost as bad as mine was. I had a leaking windshield, and the car sat outside for 5 years with it. I tried finding a replacement, but couldn't. Almost went with a marine grade fuse block. I cut mine out, and went with aircraft circuit breakers. I also put a large relay on the main power, and breakers on the high draw components. Going to put a relay on the headlights too. Way overkill, but I only want to do it once. I had a mustang that had a dash fire, i'm determined to not experience that again.

 

If you have a dremel moto-tool, they have thin brass brushes that work well for getting into those fuse contacts. That was my first plan of attack, until I decided it was too rough to save. 

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