Car-Nicopia

Finally ordered a trailer. What's the best floor coating?

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I finally stepped up and ordered an enclosed trailer. I'm getting an ATC 20' Raven with 5,200 lbs axles, V-nose and other upgrades. I can't believe how excited I am to buy an aluminum box...

What is the best coating to use on the plywood floor? 

 

Thanks

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3 minutes ago, oldcarfudd said:

Why not get an aluminum floor?

Wasn't an option on the trailer I choose.

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5 minutes ago, Buick64C said:

I finally stepped up and ordered an enclosed trailer. I'm getting an ATC 20' Raven with 5,200 lbs axles, V-nose and other upgrades. I can't believe how excited I am to buy an aluminum box...

What is the best coating to use on the plywood floor? 

 

Thanks

 

 Latex and sand?

 

  Ben

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Most good companies, such as ATC, Forest River, etc. will accomodate special requests - like an aluminum floor - but you have to sometimes push the ask beyond the local sales rep.

It it worth a try to get back to the owner of the franchise, or check with corporate - you won't regret the extra bucks in the long run -

ask me how I know-

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Agree with Marty. Love the aluminum floor on my Featherlite. Hate the plywood floor on my Continental Cargo. To cover a plywood floor I would recommend roll linoleum, as you can replace it easily if (when) it gets damaged. But you'll need a surface that provides traction on the ramp door. Maybe cover the tread track areas with Diamond Plate aluminum. 

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Inquire about, "coin rubber" of the correct grade.  It's the rubber flooring with the little raised circles.  Easy to maintain and you won't slip and break your neck when it gets wet.  

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I second sheet rubber flooring loose laid, coin or grain finish. When it’s dirty or oil-covered, haul it out and wash it or just replace it.  Paint the ramp with Rustoleum with sand mixed in. Paint stores have packages of grit for this. 

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I have the aluminum diamond plate it cleans up easily no stains carpet on the rear door is not good makes the door heavy

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2 hours ago, Ben Bruce aka First Born said:

 

 Latex and sand?

 

  Ben

 

I HAD a tile floor, removed and painted it with a heavy duty epoxy paint mixed with sand and it is the only way to go. 

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I went to a discount flooring store and bought linoleum in a large black/white checker pattern. The pattern helps you get your car aligned where you want it and is easy and cheap to replace when it gets nasty. Since my cars tend to leak I keep an incontinent pad in the appropriate place with tape on the corners and just change as needed, usually once a year. I used the paint and sand treatment on the ramp and it has held up well. I just used some leftover house paint and sandblasting sand.

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Carpet remints work great you can change them often as needed.  Keep the plywood floor.  It's not big enough for a show room and just adds weight.  I believe in over kill in towing.  For the past 10 years I've towed a 24' enclosed hauling a '56 Lincoln Conv.  I specified HD axles for the larger brakes (7500 Lbs).  I had the manufacturer rate the trailer at 10,000 pounds to keep out of CDL requirements, but I knew I actually had 15,000 pounds rated available.  Way over kill.  Pulled by a Chevy 3500,  long bed dualy.  Way over kill again, but in 100,000 miles of towing, never an issue or scare.

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If you're going to paint with sand, I recommend that you don't put the sand in the paint first. I've found out that if you put a good coat on first and while it's still wet, sprinkle the sand on. Let it dry over night. The next day, vacuum the excess off and add a second coat. That way you can repaint it when it starts to look bad. 

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The nice thing about all aluminum is that it can be hosed out.

Our dirt cars are always dumping clods.

Mine has tiny ribs running across the floor so is difficult to sweep, But a hose works well.

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Inquire about, "coin rubber" of the correct grade.  It's the rubber flooring with the little raised circles.  Easy to maintain and you won't slip and break your neck when it gets wet.

 

I have an ATC trailer with this flooring and I like it a lot....I am prone to slipping and in this trailer I do not! :) 

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1 hour ago, JACK M said:

The nice thing about all aluminum is that it can be hosed out.

Our dirt cars are always dumping clods.

Mine has tiny ribs running across the floor so is difficult to sweep, But a hose works well.

 

Mine is the same way with ribs, but like Steve's thoughts per slipping -

as I age, am becoming less flexible,

and likely harder tto put back together👍

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After a lot of research and hand-ringing, I decided to use DRYLOK Latex Concrete Floor Paint with silica added to it. I choose this because I figured it will be more resilient over time then the other options I considered. 

 

The challenge of using this material is it is very thin compared to other paints. I presume this is so it will penetrate cement. Because of this, the wood soaked it up pretty quickly. In hindsight, a coat of primer might have been a good idea. I was able to do one coat over the entire 22" trailer and ramp. I then finished of the remaining paint off by applying an addition three more coats to the ramp. I'll definitely need another coat inside the trailer. With the silica mixed in to the paint, it was a bit of a challenge getting it even across the surface since it sinks to the bottom of the can.  However, this did allow me to use the remaining, silica rich paint on the ramp.

 

EDIT: The color I have was mixed to get to a battleship grey. It’s not a stock color.

 

drylok-latex-concrete-floor-paint-400.pn

 

IMG_0287.thumb.jpg.f4c7ad2fa656f223cc32282be9450a45.jpgIMG_0289.thumb.jpg.5aad7fd4db908588173d3dc8c05381de.jpg0

Edited by Car-Nicopia (see edit history)

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Thanks for posting this thread.

 

My new 24 foot custom enclosed car hauler has a ramp door on it.

 

This sounds like a good choice and I like that color.

 

A cheap way to protect any floor covering in a trailer or garage from spills is Harbor Freight moving blankets.

 

 

Jim

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36 minutes ago, Trulyvintage said:

 

This sounds like a good choice and I like that color.

 

 

Jim

 

I’m glad you mention this because I need to point out this is not a stock color. I had them mix it to get me to a battleship grey.

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 I have a car trailer with steel diamond plate.

 I painted it, and sprinkled Black Beauty Blasting media on it followed with a second coat.

 My theory is that the sand may scratch of the raised surfaces of the diamond plate but will never scratch off of the low surface.

 It is impossible to slide your foot on this surface, even if it is wet with water and oil!

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11 hours ago, Car-Nicopia said:

 

I’m glad you mention this because I need to point out this is not a stock color. I had them mix it to get me to a battleship grey.

 

Where did you buy this at ?

 

 

Jim

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3 hours ago, Roger Walling said:

 I have a car trailer with steel diamond plate.

 I painted it, and sprinkled Black Beauty Blasting media on it followed with a second coat.

 My theory is that the sand may scratch of the raised surfaces of the diamond plate but will never scratch off of the low surface.

 It is impossible to slide your foot on this surface, even if it is wet with water and oil!

 

 

Great Suggestion

 

 

Jim

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Check the weight difference between an aluminum and a steel trailer and you will see in SOME cases the aluminum trailer is not that much lighter than steel. So do an actual weight comparison before buying. Featerlite is a good light trailer but if you want to use it for equipment also it is not recommended unless you ordered it with the heavier construction to be used for other than cars.

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