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Finally ordered a trailer. What's the best floor coating?


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5 minutes ago, Buick64C said:

I finally stepped up and ordered an enclosed trailer. I'm getting an ATC 20' Raven with 5,200 lbs axles, V-nose and other upgrades. I can't believe how excited I am to buy an aluminum box...

What is the best coating to use on the plywood floor? 

 

Thanks

 

 Latex and sand?

 

  Ben

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Most good companies, such as ATC, Forest River, etc. will accomodate special requests - like an aluminum floor - but you have to sometimes push the ask beyond the local sales rep.

It it worth a try to get back to the owner of the franchise, or check with corporate - you won't regret the extra bucks in the long run -

ask me how I know-

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Agree with Marty. Love the aluminum floor on my Featherlite. Hate the plywood floor on my Continental Cargo. To cover a plywood floor I would recommend roll linoleum, as you can replace it easily if (when) it gets damaged. But you'll need a surface that provides traction on the ramp door. Maybe cover the tread track areas with Diamond Plate aluminum. 

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I second sheet rubber flooring loose laid, coin or grain finish. When it’s dirty or oil-covered, haul it out and wash it or just replace it.  Paint the ramp with Rustoleum with sand mixed in. Paint stores have packages of grit for this. 

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I went to a discount flooring store and bought linoleum in a large black/white checker pattern. The pattern helps you get your car aligned where you want it and is easy and cheap to replace when it gets nasty. Since my cars tend to leak I keep an incontinent pad in the appropriate place with tape on the corners and just change as needed, usually once a year. I used the paint and sand treatment on the ramp and it has held up well. I just used some leftover house paint and sandblasting sand.

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Carpet remints work great you can change them often as needed.  Keep the plywood floor.  It's not big enough for a show room and just adds weight.  I believe in over kill in towing.  For the past 10 years I've towed a 24' enclosed hauling a '56 Lincoln Conv.  I specified HD axles for the larger brakes (7500 Lbs).  I had the manufacturer rate the trailer at 10,000 pounds to keep out of CDL requirements, but I knew I actually had 15,000 pounds rated available.  Way over kill.  Pulled by a Chevy 3500,  long bed dualy.  Way over kill again, but in 100,000 miles of towing, never an issue or scare.

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If you're going to paint with sand, I recommend that you don't put the sand in the paint first. I've found out that if you put a good coat on first and while it's still wet, sprinkle the sand on. Let it dry over night. The next day, vacuum the excess off and add a second coat. That way you can repaint it when it starts to look bad. 

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The nice thing about all aluminum is that it can be hosed out.

Our dirt cars are always dumping clods.

Mine has tiny ribs running across the floor so is difficult to sweep, But a hose works well.

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Inquire about, "coin rubber" of the correct grade.  It's the rubber flooring with the little raised circles.  Easy to maintain and you won't slip and break your neck when it gets wet.

 

I have an ATC trailer with this flooring and I like it a lot....I am prone to slipping and in this trailer I do not! :) 

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1 hour ago, JACK M said:

The nice thing about all aluminum is that it can be hosed out.

Our dirt cars are always dumping clods.

Mine has tiny ribs running across the floor so is difficult to sweep, But a hose works well.

 

Mine is the same way with ribs, but like Steve's thoughts per slipping -

as I age, am becoming less flexible,

and likely harder tto put back together👍

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  • 4 weeks later...

After a lot of research and hand-ringing, I decided to use DRYLOK Latex Concrete Floor Paint with silica added to it. I choose this because I figured it will be more resilient over time then the other options I considered. 

 

The challenge of using this material is it is very thin compared to other paints. I presume this is so it will penetrate cement. Because of this, the wood soaked it up pretty quickly. In hindsight, a coat of primer might have been a good idea. I was able to do one coat over the entire 22" trailer and ramp. I then finished of the remaining paint off by applying an addition three more coats to the ramp. I'll definitely need another coat inside the trailer. With the silica mixed in to the paint, it was a bit of a challenge getting it even across the surface since it sinks to the bottom of the can.  However, this did allow me to use the remaining, silica rich paint on the ramp.

 

EDIT: The color I have was mixed to get to a battleship grey. It’s not a stock color.

 

drylok-latex-concrete-floor-paint-400.pn

 

IMG_0287.thumb.jpg.f4c7ad2fa656f223cc32282be9450a45.jpgIMG_0289.thumb.jpg.5aad7fd4db908588173d3dc8c05381de.jpg0

Edited by Car-Nicopia (see edit history)
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Thanks for posting this thread.

 

My new 24 foot custom enclosed car hauler has a ramp door on it.

 

This sounds like a good choice and I like that color.

 

A cheap way to protect any floor covering in a trailer or garage from spills is Harbor Freight moving blankets.

 

 

Jim

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 I have a car trailer with steel diamond plate.

 I painted it, and sprinkled Black Beauty Blasting media on it followed with a second coat.

 My theory is that the sand may scratch of the raised surfaces of the diamond plate but will never scratch off of the low surface.

 It is impossible to slide your foot on this surface, even if it is wet with water and oil!

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3 hours ago, Roger Walling said:

 I have a car trailer with steel diamond plate.

 I painted it, and sprinkled Black Beauty Blasting media on it followed with a second coat.

 My theory is that the sand may scratch of the raised surfaces of the diamond plate but will never scratch off of the low surface.

 It is impossible to slide your foot on this surface, even if it is wet with water and oil!

 

 

Great Suggestion

 

 

Jim

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Check the weight difference between an aluminum and a steel trailer and you will see in SOME cases the aluminum trailer is not that much lighter than steel. So do an actual weight comparison before buying. Featerlite is a good light trailer but if you want to use it for equipment also it is not recommended unless you ordered it with the heavier construction to be used for other than cars.

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On 9/17/2019 at 2:44 PM, Car-Nicopia said:

After a lot of research and hand-ringing, I decided to use DRYLOK Latex Concrete Floor Paint with silica added to it. I choose this because I figured it will be more resilient over time then the other options I considered. 

 

The challenge of using this material is it is very thin compared to other paints. I presume this is so it will penetrate cement. Because of this, the wood soaked it up pretty quickly. In hindsight, a coat of primer might have been a good idea. I was able to do one coat over the entire 22" trailer and ramp. I then finished of the remaining paint off by applying an addition three more coats to the ramp. I'll definitely need another coat inside the trailer. With the silica mixed in to the paint, it was a bit of a challenge getting it even across the surface since it sinks to the bottom of the can.  However, this did allow me to use the remaining, silica rich paint on the ramp.

 

EDIT: The color I have was mixed to get to a battleship grey. It’s not a stock color.

 

drylok-latex-concrete-floor-paint-400.pn

 

IMG_0287.thumb.jpg.f4c7ad2fa656f223cc32282be9450a45.jpgIMG_0289.thumb.jpg.5aad7fd4db908588173d3dc8c05381de.jpg0

 

Floor looks great!

 

Just a suggestion, I would consider mounting the spare down low near the front of the the trailer. When you get a flat or a blowout you don't want to be opening everything up to get to the tire, then be lifting it around and over your prize possession 

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2 hours ago, Joe in Canada said:

Check the weight difference between an aluminum and a steel trailer and you will see in SOME cases the aluminum trailer is not that much lighter than steel. So do an actual weight comparison before buying. Featerlite is a good light trailer but if you want to use it for equipment also it is not recommended unless you ordered it with the heavier construction to be used for other than cars.

 

I totally agree getting a light trailer is more of a challenge then I thought it would be. I've spent about 2 years looking at everything I could find and ended up with an ATC Raven with every lightening option they offered. I had them use aluminum for the inside walls and had to forgo the escape door because it adds about 200 lbs. According to the manufacturer, this trailer weighs 2,335 lbs. with a tongue weight of 190 lbs. I haven't had it weighed, but it pulls like it's light when empty. Later this week, I'll be hauling a car for the first time.

 

36 minutes ago, John348 said:

 

Just a suggestion, I would consider mounting the spare down low near the front of the the trailer. When you get a flat or a blowout you don't want to be opening everything up to get to the tire, then be lifting it around and over your prize possession 

 

That's a good suggestion. Thanks. I did talk through this with my salesman. I want to keep the tongue weight as low as possible, so that's why I put it in the back.  When I trailer smaller, lighter cars, I'll move it upfront. Your point does inspire me to take it down just to see how heavy it is.

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I would never have a spare tire/wheel mounted up on a wall inside a trailer.  First, just having to lift it off, especially while having a car in the trailer, is not fun, nor sometimes not all that safe.  Second, if that sucker ever comes loose just think of the damage it will do to your car while bouncing all around inside your trailer as you're still heading down the road.  That's a surprise I just don't even want to think about seeing when I arrive at the show site!

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5 hours ago, franklinman said:

I would never have a spare tire/wheel mounted up on a wall inside a trailer.  First, just having to lift it off, especially while having a car in the trailer, is not fun, nor sometimes not all that safe.  Second, if that sucker ever comes loose just think of the damage it will do to your car while bouncing all around inside your trailer as you're still heading down the road.  That's a surprise I just don't even want to think about seeing when I arrive at the show site!

 

Do you know of any incidence of a spare tire breaking loose and flying around? 

Edited by Car-Nicopia (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, Car-Nicopia said:

 

Do you of any incidence of a spare tire breaking loose and flying around? 

 

No I have not, but to be honest with you I don't ever recall seeing anyone mount a spare like that either.

 

This is now I mounted my spares and I personally would never travel with just one spare. Also I recommend picking up some swimming pool noodles that you see in the corner of the photo. Just slice them open and slip them over your door cables when loading and unloading.  One mistake and they can do a lot of damage to your car, I also heard of a situation where a young child ran into the cable and got a real nasty cut.

 

IMG_6495.JPG

Edited by John348 (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, John348 said:

 

No I have not, but to be honest with you I don't ever recall seeing anyone mount a spare like that either.

 

This is now I mounted my spares and I personally would never travel with just one spare. Also I recommend picking up some swimming pool noodles that you see in the corner of the photo. Just slice them open and slip them over your door cables when loading and unloading.  One mistake and they can do a lot of damage to your car, I also heard of a situation where a young child ran into the cable and got a real nasty cut.

 

IMG_6495.JPG

 

I don’t know that I’ve ever seen one mounted there either. I just figured they wouldn’t offer it there if it wasn’t secure. These guys are welding axles, winch plates and couplers to the frame, so a spare seems low risk..

 

My use for this trailer is for a variety of car sizes, from 12’ long to 17’. For the bigger cars, I’m kind of threading the needle a bit. Having the spare up, out of the way will be helpful. When I tow a smaller car, I’ll probably move it down for easy access should I get a flat. I’m not sure that I would have thought of that, so I do appreciate the comment. The pool noodle is also a great idea. I also plan to paint the edges of the ramp wood a bright color to help people see it.

 

 

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12 hours ago, Car-Nicopia said:

The pool noodle is also a great idea. I also plan to paint the edges of the ramp wood a bright color to help people see it.

 

Water pipe insulation from the hardware store is already slit.

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