neil morse

Great low-mileage '41 Buick on Ebay -- Not mine

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But it really is Melanie's car, not mine. I'm OK with that, too.

 

if you repeat it enough, you will eventually believe it...................

 

:)

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2 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

It really is Melanie's car. ... It really is her car. .. But it really is Melanie's car, not mine. I'm OK with that, too.

 

 

Haha -- Good to see that you're comfortable owning a pink car!  🤣

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  2 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

It really is Melanie's car. ... It really is her car. .. But it really is Melanie's car, not mine. I'm OK with that, too

 

So, whose name is on the title?

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Melanie's name is on the title and she is always very particular when she registers it for shows that it be under her name. It's hard for us as privileged white men to understand what it's like, but she's in a man's business and the number of guys who treat her like an idiot or ignore her altogether at shows and in our offices would astound you. When someone asks about the car and she answers them, they are as likely as not to say, "Did your husband tell you to say all that?" It's beyond offensive and in our business, you're taking a big risk to dismiss her. Anyone who blows her off as just a secretary just gravely reduced their chances of getting the car they want, never mind a deal on it. Our business looks like it does not because of me (I just talk about cars) but because of her. Think about it.

 

So while it seems like I'm trying to cover for a pink car but what I'm really trying to say is that it is her car and she's an equal. She knows as much about the car as I do, maybe more, and it's a mistake to pat her on the head and wait for a man to explain things to you instead. 

 

Go ahead and watch conversations in the hobby where there's a woman involved. In fact, watch yourselves because you surely do it without even knowing it. If you're really paying attention, you'll be surprised (and hopefully dismayed) by how easily women are dismissed by men in this hobby. 

 

THAT is my point.

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Buick? What Buick?  O yes, we started on Buick and then went to Detroit.  The comments here on the Buick are very informative, it seems you need to be up on your market values today.  And Pink Chrysler’s are cool no matter who owns it.  I looked at Hemmings and saw a similar Buick at $15k.  

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56 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

Melanie's name is on the title 

 

Go ahead and watch conversations in the hobby where there's a woman involved.  

 

THAT is my point.

 

Good response, Matt,

 

... and my wife Dale has for years had her AACA Senior Master Judge status

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8 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

It's not even a fair fight. It was pretty much a modern car,

A good friend has a mid-50's Mopar, and that's the same impression I got riding with him.  Feels like cheating, here's an old car, yet it's fast, nimble, comfortable, great visibility, so drivable it hurts.....What's the fun in that?  Well, actually quite a bit.....

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Just now, trimacar said:

A good friend has a mid-50's Mopar, and that's the same impression I got riding with him.  Feels like cheating, here's an old car, yet it's fast, nimble, comfortable, great visibility, so drivable it hurts.....What's the fun in that?  Well, actually quite a bit.....

 

Actually, we get that same feeling with our 1941 Cadillac convertible coupe (cabriolet?),

Easy to drive,

Fast,

Relatively nimble for her size and weight,

Handle any highway for hours at a time (did this last September when tow rig went down),

Comfortable,

Reasonable visibility - except rear quarters,

Fun? - Absolutely !

Economy? - not why we got it, but 12.5 mpg around town and 16.9 mpg @ 73 mph average (per GPS)  for last 200 miles on Idaho's I-84 

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1 minute ago, Marty Roth said:

Economy? - not why we got it, but 12.5 mpg around town and 16.9 mpg @ 73 mph average (per GPS)  for last 200 miles on Idaho's I-84 

 

If anything, that was the Chrysler's downside. I figured we might be able to get as much as 14-15 MPG on the open highway, but after three fill-ups of 13, 13, and 11 gallons, I figure we're getting between 10 and 11 MPG in the Chrysler. That's pretty lousy, even for a big old wagon. It's not like it really matters but I was kind of hoping for a little more. The spec sheet says it has 3.73 gears, which would explain a lot of it, but it cruises like it has something more like a 3.23. I mean, the engine is dead silent at 75 MPH and if it were spinning at 3600-3800 RPM with 3.73 gears, I'm sure I'd hear it. I'm going to do some investigating this week now that we've had some highway driving.

 

My '41 60S would easily pull down 16 MPG on the highway, which was a pleasant surprise. 3.36 gears certainly help the Hydra-Matic Cadillacs!

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18 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

 My '41 60S would easily pull down 16 MPG on the highway, which was a pleasant surprise. 3.36 gears certainly help the Hydra-Matic Cadillacs!

 

Our 62 Series Convertible coupe with 3-on-the-tree supposedly has the standsrd 3.77:1 differential. I would love to have the 3.36:1 ratio and the Hydra-matic's 4th gear Overdrive ratio. As I understand Matt's correction, 4th is 1:1 coming out of the 4-speed Hydra-matic in our 1954 Caddy which comes with a 3.07:1 differential ratio - a Serious Cruiser !

 

Thank you Matt for the correction. I had previously been told that Hydra 4th was an O.D.

Edited by Marty Roth
typo, and additional note (see edit history)

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No, 4th gear in the Hydra-Matic is still direct drive 1:1. Hydra-Matic cars got the 3.36 rear gears because first and second are much lower than the manual transmission, plus the torque multiplication effect of the torque converter (or fluid coupling for the pedants out there). 

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4 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Melanie's name is on the title and she is always very particular when she registers it for shows that it be under her name. It's hard for us as privileged white men to understand what it's like, but she's in a man's business and the number of guys who treat her like an idiot or ignore her altogether at shows and in our offices would astound you. When someone asks about the car and she answers them, they are as likely as not to say, "Did your husband tell you to say all that?" It's beyond offensive and in our business, you're taking a big risk to dismiss her. Anyone who blows her off as just a secretary just gravely reduced their chances of getting the car they want, never mind a deal on it. Our business looks like it does not because of me (I just talk about cars) but because of her. Think about it.

 

So while it seems like I'm trying to cover for a pink car but what I'm really trying to say is that it is her car and she's an equal. She knows as much about the car as I do, maybe more, and it's a mistake to pat her on the head and wait for a man to explain things to you instead. 

 

Go ahead and watch conversations in the hobby where there's a woman involved. In fact, watch yourselves because you surely do it without even knowing it. If you're really paying attention, you'll be surprised (and hopefully dismayed) by how easily women are dismissed by men in this hobby. 

 

THAT is my point.

Well said, Matt!

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The problem is that most "manly" men won't even consider driving a pink car  " Real" Men drive whatever they darn well please and if some one doesn't like it too bad for them!

Edited by plymouthcranbrook (see edit history)

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to the contrary about women, my wife knows nothing about cars, wants to know nothing about cars and you'ld be smart to not ask her a thing about cars.................

 

just how it is.

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1 hour ago, mercer09 said:

to the contrary about women, my wife knows nothing about cars, wants to know nothing about cars and you'ld be smart to not ask her a thing about cars.................

 

just how it is.

 

Regardless of the topic, I'll wager she still doesn't like being treated like an idiot or dismissed just because she's a woman.

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On ‎8‎/‎17‎/‎2019 at 8:19 AM, mercer09 said:

Please explain WHY you think the price is right?  Because "you can't restore one for that price?

 

 

so you think you can buy these cars for under 8900 and that is fair value?

 

good luck with that...........................

 

this isnt 1929.

mercer09


Recently you and I have gotten sideways on these issues, so I am assuming there is some dislike for my comments in general.  Here, I simply asked for a reason why you believe $25 large is a fair price for this car.  I can tell you that I monitor all markets for fun, not anything else, and $25,000 - especially from this dealer that purchased it wholesale from the seller-estate family - is all about profit taking by the dealer. 

 

Last week that very nice 1938 Cadillac Sixty Special sold for $8500 on the Cadillac LaSalle Club website, member to member.  I am a BCA and CLC member, and in the Bugle there are several cars that can be purchased for far less than $25,000 for this car.   I remember about 2 months ago, Matt Harwood did a search of Hemmings for cars $10,000 or less, pre war and came up with hundreds of hits. 

 

I think the right price for this car is $12,000 to $15,000, subject to inspection. But the difference has to come out of the dealer's profit, so it will remain unsold for awhile. If it was such a hot buy at $25,000, then someone would have used the Best Offer option, and placed perhaps a $20,000 bid.

I base pricing on market reality, trends which include how this car ended up with a dealer - and that is a general dumping of baby boomer or best generation collectors and their kids of these closed cars on the market.  There is a surplus, even though it may not seem so on a micro level where we pull one car out of a hat to review like this one, overall, many of these cars are being placed in the market because of owners who are still alive "down sizing" or estates selling dad's cars.   This recent analysis all started, kind of, with Earl's 1939 Buick convertible posts. 

 

I spoke with a 1924 Cadillac owner of a closed car, asking price is $19,500.  We had a great conversation, lots of honesty and it is a nice car.  I asked for the purposes of my needing to "hustle" up to buy the car "have you had much interest in your ad."  He said "Not one call, text or email until you"  It's a 3 week old ad.

 

Thankfully, as noted, we have reached the point where these closed cars are no longer matching the 401k market for upward pricing ensuring a profit for sellers who simply put them in a garage.  This attitude has left thousands of potential next generation owners out of the hobby.  It sure has limited what I can buy.  I recently got approved for a $40,000 loan to buy a couple of old cars, but there is no way I am over-spending just to scratch an itch.  I'll keep looking, not for bargains, but for the "right" car at the market correct price that would satisfy both buyer and seller.

 

I am simply asking for proof of why $25,000 is a "fair" price? If you have the proof, it educates me and others.  If not, then you are still entitled to your opinion on the forum.  Have a good day. 

Edited by B Jake Moran (see edit history)
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11 hours ago, 30 Hupp said:

Well said, Matt!

Lots of active women in the Buick Club and Cadillac Club.  Sometimes only women come to monthly get togethers!  Big help at meets, equals.  My wife has lost interest in the hobby but will go to monthly get togethers.

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I am simply asking for proof of why $25,000 is a "fair" price? If you have the proof, it educates me and others.  If not, then you are still entitled to your opinion on the forum.  Have a good day. 

 

actually I agree with you on most comments- I search thousands of car ads every week, as a hobby. I feel this car is a solid buy at 20k. I pretty much have a pulse of the market. Maybe not so much on a 1913 Mercer, but on cars priced under 50k.

and yes I do look at the sold prices and pay no regard to asking prices. this car may only be a special, but in the grand scheme of things, I believe you will be hard pressed to find one as nice. Plenty of cars that are only 10k, but then need a whole new interior or a paint job.

most are well aware of what either of those can cost.

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