1940Super

1940 instrument panel engine turning

Recommended Posts

There was some uncertainty among some members weather or not the engine turning was a decal or not. 1940 Service Presentation makes it pretty clear:

20190804_232903.thumb.jpg.70b38d03ddc87edae0e7bd1659bf4e85.jpg

Unfortunately most of the engine turning on my panels has been buffed out. I wish there was a decal replacement because as much as I'd love to have the turning done again it'd would be right out of my budget. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Benefits of AACA Membership.

 

PhotoGrid_1565878581686.thumb.jpg.b3e3b6cf2fbb2758a09316acc5724ad2.jpg

Here is my radio panel. My assumption would be the turning was done first on a flat sheet then stamped into shape based on that the turning is evident in the dial recess. There are some small areas where there is still lacquer, mostly on the unseen parts such as the bottom of the panels. The lacquer has darkened with age and makes the turning stand out more.

 When I peeled away some of the lacquer away it made the turning stand out considerably less.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are vendors who sell "engine turned" stainless and aluminum 2D panels and will custom make any pattern. I have seen none that can stamp new 3D . i wonder if,after  stripping off the lacquer you could find a non abrasive cleaner/polisher. I love the '40-41 dashes and am considering one for my '37 resto-mod 

 

http://www.fpmmetals.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Street-Rod-Price-List.pdf  This came up one my first Google search. Below is a link to a DIY solution that is pretty cool. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent find, 1940Super!  Can you give a more complete description of the "Service Presentation" you show in your photo?  I would like to send it to Doug Seybold.

 

Neil

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, neil morse said:

Excellent find, 1940Super!  Can you give a more complete description of the "Service Presentation" you show in your photo?  I would like to send it to Doug Seybold.

 

Neil

Thanks Neil. In relation to the instrument panel that is all that is said about it. The 1940 Service Presentation book is available on the Buick Heritage Alliance website. It's not a very good photo so I could scan in that page and send it to you if you like?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you.  I checked out the BHA site, so now I understand what the Service Presentation book is.  Yes, that would be great if you could send me a scan of that page.  Send to morsefam "at" aol.com.  Thanks so much!

 

Neil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You guys think this might also pertain to '41's since the dashs are so similar? This is total speculation, but might it be possible Buick turned the dashes initially, ran into production or cost issues, and consequently switched to decals? That's what I would do......

Peter

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having done it myself, the video does a pretty good job of describing the engine turning process. Not trivial.

How many cars did Buick build? 100,000+?

Having seen how the Buick dash pattern can disipate, my money is on a decal. Real engine turning does not rub off or fade.  Rea turning is scratches - have you ever tried to remove a scratch from steel? You do not rub it off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, valk said:

You guys think this might also pertain to '41's since the dashs are so similar? This is total speculation, but might it be possible Buick turned the dashes initially, ran into production or cost issues, and consequently switched to decals? That's what I would do......

Peter

 

Whatever process was used, I would bet that it was the same in 1940 and 1941.  The panels look identical, and I doubt that Buick would have changed the process in mid-stream.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, DonMicheletti said:

Having done it myself, the video does a pretty good job of describing the engine turning process. Not trivial.

How many cars did Buick build? 100,000+?

Having seen how the Buick dash pattern can disipate, my money is on a decal. Real engine turning does not rub off or fade.  Rea turning is scratches - have you ever tried to remove a scratch from steel? You do not rub it 

I will do more testing on mine with Emery paper to see what it takes to make it disappear. So far I have scraped hard against the steel with a blade, it removed the lacquer but the turning was still there. 

Is your experience with 40s, 41s or both dashes rubbing off easily?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is a long time ago, but I think it was a '41, maybe even '42 if they used it. It was a friends car.

 

If you cant scrape or sand it off it shounds real and should be easy to restore by just redoing the clearcoat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PhotoGrid_1565965253448.thumb.jpg.602921d8674a86771c5415f040d16df9.jpg

600 grit was the finest paper I could find. From left before shot with lacquer and turning still instant. Rubbed with paper, after look was removed it didnt tale long got turning to disappear as the paper was scratching into the surface. 3rd photo is paint stripper. Rubbed it away with a cloth, lacquer gone but turning still intact. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Appreciate your efforts 40Super but I don't see it. If anything, pics kinda support it being a decal. Here's hoping Bill Anderson can get to the bottom of this. 

Peter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your left photo makes me wonder if was an etching process rather than an actual turning or decal. Paint stripper would not remove real engine turning.

 

The pattern is fully removed in the right photos.

If it is an etching process, I can undersatand that as a production process.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is another thread on the same topic that is not that old 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PhotoGrid_1565970397567.thumb.jpg.0a6d968ba945c43b7f6dc36d1724dacb.jpg

A zoomed in screenshot of the area that had the paint stripper on it. 

I'm not claiming the photos are proof of anything but to believe the process is something other then engine turning is challenging Buick's word, they clearly stated it, not me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Screenshot_20190817-022303_Gallery.thumb.jpg.5a3b16c07ec3c1c29b18b7d821e1ab81.jpg

Zoomed in again. I'm pretty amazed at the detail from a phone camera. Those circle marks aren't seen to the naked eye

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep I'm with you now; those are clearly machined swirls.  Doesn't rule out the possibility, however remote, that Buick switched methods (to decals) somewhere along the line. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes that's possible. Or at some point somebody was providing replacement decals. Once the lacquer protection deteriorated the bare metal rust quickly and as I demonstrated, it doesn't take much sanding for the finely machined swirls to be removed before the rust is.

 

Edited by 1940Super (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/15/2019 at 11:50 PM, 1940Super said:

 

PhotoGrid_1565878581686.thumb.jpg.b3e3b6cf2fbb2758a09316acc5724ad2.jpg

Here is my radio panel. My assumption would be the turning was done first on a flat sheet then stamped into shape based on that the turning is evident in the dial recess. There are some small areas where there is still lacquer, mostly on the unseen parts such as the bottom of the panels. The lacquer has darkened with age and makes the turning stand out more.

 When I peeled away some of the lacquer away it made the turning stand out considerably less.

 

I agree with your thoughts on the process of engine-turning flat sheet, then placing each sheet into a press to stamp out the glove box & instrument panels. I'm a toolmaker by trade so understand this process quite clearly.

 

On another note, are you going to the Buick Nationals (Australia) in October 2020? I am!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Grant Z said:

I agree with your thoughts on the process of engine-turning flat sheet, then placing each sheet into a press to stamp out the glove box & instrument panels. I'm a toolmaker by trade so understand this process quite clearly.

 

On another note, are you going to the Buick Nationals (Australia) in October 2020? I am!

I haven't seen the details of it so I'll check it out

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎8‎/‎15‎/‎2019 at 7:05 PM, DonMicheletti said:

Having done it myself, the video does a pretty good job of describing the engine turning process. Not trivial.

How many cars did Buick build? 100,000+?

Having seen how the Buick dash pattern can disipate, my money is on a decal. Real engine turning does not rub off or fade.  Rea turning is scratches - have you ever tried to remove a scratch from steel? You do not rub it off.

 

It rusts off. Or at least the rust makes it fade. This is my '40 dashboard after 78 years of rust.

.

buickmachine.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, 1940Super said:

I haven't seen the details of it so I'll check it out

No entry forms are available yet, but accommodation can be booked at Whiters Holiday Village where the Buick Club of Oz have temporarily booked the place out (special deal when you mention you're part of the event). Book this ASAP if you wish to go.  http://www.whiters.com.au/. Event is Oct 11-17, 2020.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Morgan Wright said:

 

It rusts off. Or at least the rust makes it fade. This is my '40 dashboard after 78 years of rust.

.

buickmachine.jpg

Evidence of the engine turning is still there in the photo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, 61polara said:

Evidence of the engine turning is still there in the photo.

 

Again, don't shoot the messenger -- this is not my theory but what Doug Seybold told me.  He believes that the "shadow" of engine turning that is left on the metal after the decal is worn off is caused by the way that the metal surface oxidizes over time under the decal.  The oxidation process essentially creates a shadowy "imprint" of the pattern on the metal.  I do not have the expertise to weigh in on the merits of this theory -- just putting it out there.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now