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Mark Huston

Is this a converted coupe?

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I saw this picture on another site and it looks to me like this is a standard coupe that has a homemade rumble seat.    I wonder if this period original car was still around today would it be excepted in this condition in a car modern show?

3064B33B-9ED4-41A0-8CAC-29F13DB0FEAA.jpeg

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Mark, 

That is certainly a jury-rigged rumble seat cover lid. Judging by the overall condition of the car's appearance, it's easy to assume that this vehicle was old and heavily-used at the time the photo was taken. I would GUESS the car was manufactured from mid 1920's back through the very early teens, and if it was indeed an older used vehicle, then this photo could easily have been taken during the great depression. This would explain a young family with a baby doing whatever they could to afford any kind of transportation. I have not often seen a photo with the man of the family sitting in a rumble seat, so I would GUESS that he is proud of his homemade repair, and showing it off by climbing inside. 

 

As to your question about whether this car would be "accepted" as-is at a modern car show event... The answer is "depends." If that car were to be dragged out of a barn today in exactly that condition, and after some tinkering was made to be able to drive around a show field, I suspect that car-show attendees would LOVE it, and crowd around it to get a better look. On the other hand, if it were entered into a judging competition in a restored or "unrestored original" class, I suspect it would not win any trophies. 

 

Just MY opinion. 

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The car looks like it might have had its trunk converted into a rumble seat. There is no step plates to get into the rumble seat which is one clue that makes me think this car was not originally equipped with a rumble seat.     I agree it is an older car that is still providing useful service to a young family.   

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Not a model T Ford, for whatever that is worth. Otherwise, I am not certain of any make. Car's year appears to be early to mid '20s. The "rumble seat" is clearly a home-made job, and far from the best I have ever seen. But hey! Whatever works! Rumble seat kits were made and sold after-market for many cars including model Ts, Chevrolet, Dodge, and many others. I have seen a few of the kits on restored cars. Some of them looked really nice.

I zoomed in a bit closer, but couldn't make out the state or year of the license plate. However, most states went to the larger size by 1929, so likely the picture is from before that.  Looks like a young family, and that should do well for them for the few years just ahead.

 

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Actually I don't think the vehicle is in running condition as I can't see a radiator.  The engine bonnet looks a bit disorientated and drooping down at the front as if the joining pin for the top section is not in place with the side panel.  If the radiator was in place I don't believe the top section would drop that much.  Looks to me like a family posing for a photograph with an old car.

I would identify the vehicle as a circa 1924 model 91 Overland Coupe.  No idea if these had a rumble seat or not.

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I do see a radiator and the hood has some large bends on the top right side. A cloth step plate covering a cracked fender.

The plate may have 1932 on the far right side.

The wife is smiling because her mother can come along. She may be standing on the front porch in front of the car. 

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I like the "custom rumble" seat step plate on the rear fender. Also interesting that this early 1920s Chevrolet had its 30 x 3 1/2"  clincher wheels/tires/rims replaced with 21" balloon split rims, yet the spare is still the 30x3 1/2" clincher rim.  A great old photo taken of an old car when it was already an "old car". 

 

These depression-era photos are great. Even though this car is well worn, it was still a part of the family and worthy of being included in a photo.

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