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Mssr. Bwatoe

SYMPTOMS OF FAILING DRIVESHAFT BEARING

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Hi gang,  I wonder if any of you more "seasoned" fellows can help me, I developed a new intermittent

vibration at certain rpms, coasting to slow after acceleration-  No axle or diff noise or whine, no issue on hard acceleration

no change  fast or slow, seems to be when coasting with no load on driveline...

--Has anyone ever experienced a failed torque tube bearing, that big rubber "tired" device I have never

replaced in my years of Zephyring.   Im not sure how to get it out with out special k-d tool """"" or what ever..

and I dont want to take it apart for not..I also suspect possible spline wear at rear axle / driveshaft coupler..

It feels similar to a failed u joint in a modern car- deep body  rumble..car rolls smooth in neutral coasting..

Hey 40Tom   or Peecher!!

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Doesn't sound good.  But there are a couple things to try.  Jack up at least one rear wheel, put tranny in neutral, and try to spin wheel by hand. While in the air, you can also block front wheel, run engine in gear (I'd try second) and see if you can notice any thing out of ordinary.  If a bearing is bad, it usually gets warm when run.  Good Luck

Abe

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Jack up the rear end and use a screwdriver held to your ear and the other end on the torque tube to isolate the sound. It sounds more like the pin that holds the coupler over the splines is loose. The center bearing usually vibrates all of the time. The U-Joint could also be the problem, you would hear that right under the front seat.

 

If you need the center bearing, I think Skip Haney in FL has a replacement and rents out the tool to replace it.

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Just my two/pence worth, before you drop the back axle assembly to remove torque tube to inspect for wear on every thing I would pump some grease into u/joint, center bearing and both rear wheel bearing nipples inside front  of rear brake backing plates. Also retorque axle taper  hub nuts and check overdrive fluid level. This is easier than removing torque tube. Do road  test  then if vibration persists,  drop back end out.

Edited by 38ShortopConv. (see edit history)

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With vehicles in this age group, all components of the driveline need verification as to condition.  You never know if any of the parts have ever been changed or gone bad in more recent times.  Lots of the cars never really got good service like basic oil and lube maintenance which can contribute to wear.  Listening to noises might give an indication as to the area of the problem, but still full inspection of all bearings and parts in the drive line need attention as to their condition.  We also in this day and age have few real mechanics that know these cars and can fix them.  Most garages won't touch them as they say we can't get the parts which isn't true.  Just takes a little innovation and some knowledge of who's got parts as listed on the club's website.  One reason Model Ts were so popular they were easy to fix, and with so many millions of them people in today's market actually have reproduced parts or new ones to keep them on the road.  Lincoln didn't get so lucky!   

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Thanks Guys, all good advise I shall heed.  I have had everything apart on this car twice...and I have not been able to keep a pin in my rear spline

to diff coupler, they always sheared off, then rattled- have replaced shaft and pinion, kept happening, so no pin , for the last 5 or so thousand miles.

I have a lift, gonna drive in the air and listen...keep you posted..

jb 

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