trimacar

For Sale - 1919 T roadster, 1930 Chevy coach

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I'm trying to help out the son of one of my good friends.  The son is involved with the Ferrari dealership in the Chicago area, and he took in trade two cars.

 

These are not mine, I do not know condition other than photos, and don't know prices.  I've told him that the T will probably sell in the high four figure range, the Chevy somewhere in the teens, just my opinion.

 

He's a somewhat motivated seller, as these wouldn't look right on the showroom floor with all those RED cars! 

 

If you have any interest, or know someone who might, PM me and I'll give you contact information.

Casey3.jpg

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John Weinberger's Ferrari dealership on Ogden Avenue in Hinsdale, IL. Fly in and drive one home? 😎

Henry F.

 

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Obviously more Pics up close,engine pics both sides interior front and rear etc., might help, Good Luck two nice cars from what I can see and not knowing history

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They made an allowance for trade with certain price points in mind.  I've discussed those price points with gentleman, and told him my thoughts.  I don't know where final price will end up, but as he told me, they'd like to move these quickly if possible, doesn't fit with the rest of their inventory.

 

I have no financial interest in this transaction, just trying to help the son of a friend.  If I had more garage space and more money, I'd be buying that '30 coach, it looks really nice.

Casey1.jpg

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Since neither car is a "sought after" collectible, the market place is just anyone wanting a nice older runner. You certainly couldn't restore/rebuild one of these for less than $20K-$30K each, but as I see it they are worth about $20K for both as is if he wants a quick sale. Tough market these days.

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I don't disagree, if someone walked up with 20k in hand he might take them both home.  I think that's about market, too.

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I just posted these as information, and I added some of my comments.  If interested, I'll be glad to send you contact information, via PM, although sharp eyed forum members can figure out who has these cars with the pictures shown.

 

Prices are adjusting, yes, the very good cars are as strong as ever, the so-so cars are all over the place, projects are a tough sell due to cost of restoration.

 

If I were looking for a specific car to jump in the hobby and tour and show and meet a lot of interesting people, then waiting for prices to sink would just continue to deprive one of fun and memories and new friends, in the months or years spent waiting.

 

Look at it as an investment in your life enjoyment, not a monetary investment.  As discussed on another thread, why did old cars become a hobby that had to pay for itself?  There are hundreds of hobbies that have no return whatsoever, yet money is spent on them without a second thought.

 

That '30 Chevy is an intro car to the hobby, I'd guess, but it's a 55 mph car that will cruise all day and is already done.  Might need a little sorting out, sure, but for the money, can't beat it.....

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It would be a nice contrast on the show room floor between a 1919 Ford and a 2020 Ferrari.

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That's not real world, and not a figure that was mentioned to me.  Oh well, thought they wanted to move quickly.  My bad.

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35 minutes ago, trimacar said:

That's not real world, and not a figure that was mentioned to me.  Oh well, thought they wanted to move quickly.  My bad.

 

No worries. It's always good to get a lead, even if it doesn't pan out. 

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2 hours ago, Buick64C said:

I called and was told they are asking $16K and change for the Model T.

The starting point, most dealers like to do the start here and negotiating to a final price.  Make an offer and see what happens.

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The T looks to be a later model than 1919, maybe around 1923. I think the early ones had a straight windshield

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22 minutes ago, TerryB said:

The starting point, most dealers like to do the start here and negotiating to a final price.  Make an offer and see what happens.

 

For something like this, I'm an opportunist (or less polite, bottom feeder). While I'd like to buy a T at some point, there is nothing about that car that grabs my attention, other then the circumstances.

I'm more likely to step up and buy the other one for sale here, pay more and l know I'm getting a great car. 

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10 hours ago, JFranklin said:

The T looks to be a later model than 1919, maybe around 1923. I think the early ones had a straight windshield

 

Correcto........ 👍 .......and being in the doldrum years, even though a very nice example, it won't see that price point now or, likely, for years.

Even the Chevy, as nice as it is, probably won't go over 10K as it still has a crash box transmission along with the lesser improved 6 cylinder engine.

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10 hours ago, cahartley said:

 

Correcto........ 👍 .......and being in the doldrum years, even though a very nice example, it won't see that price point now or, likely, for years.

Even the Chevy, as nice as it is, probably won't go over 10K as it still has a crash box transmission along with the lesser improved 6 cylinder engine.

 

What range is the doldrum years and what exactly does that distinction mean?

 

I'm new to Model T's and plan to buy one at some point, so any insight is greatly appreciated!

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To answer your T question the doldrums are mostly 1919 to mid 20's when there were few obvious changes to the cars with most noticeable being the introduction of the slanted windshield in the 1923 production (not calendar) year.

Variations like the one in this topic and Coupes nearly always bring more money but I'm afraid the sellers have their sights set outside of the current market.

I adore my '27 Tudor T and so do most who see it when I have it our which is frequently.

Look up the differences between Model T and Improved Model T's (1926-1927).

This site is a treasure trove of Model T information >>> https://mtfca.com/phpBB3/viewforum.php?f=2

An Improved Model T will actually stop so you won't get this look on your face in a pinch....... 👀

 

TudorPainted.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Model T’s can be basically lumped into three groups:

Brass Era   1909-1916

Black Era   1917-1925

Improved   1926-1927

Brass cars usually sell pretty well, Black cars are a much tougher sell (most production) and Improved cars somewhere in the middle.

CaHartly is correct, the Improved cars are the overall best drivers. That running board trunk on the pictured Improved Tudor  is really a neat accessory!

Edited by Jeff Perkins / Mn (see edit history)
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