stvaughn

Buying a hauler, advice appreciated

Recommended Posts

Per Larry's comments:

 

Yes, my forged aluminum 8-lug wheels on the 6000 lb axles of the Forest River trailer require a "THIN-WALL 6-POINT DEEP WELL 1/2in drive. Need to find a new one, as I had to use one with a 3/8 and a conversion on the "persuader". Using the Lark trailer this trip with a pair of 3500lb axles, my standard Cross-wrench worked, but maybe I'll get a fancy wrench for my birthday?

 

I currently use a breaker bar to start the removal process, and a torque wrench to complete the re-installation.

 

My old plastic ramp now slides and have not found a replacement. For the time being, I think I need to file in the grooved teeth so that it will "bite". On the trip home from the tour I used a board to get the "good" tire onto the rampso that the bad one was suspended, remembering to loosen the lugs before getting the rig into place to change each of the 3 tires I changed. One on each side lost a belt, and another was suddenly showing excessive inner edge wear, warranting a replacement. Lucky I had 6 spares, anticipating the inevitable with this recently purchased inexpensive trailer. It has I believe" 4inch drop axles so it sits very low, and I should have readjusted the height of my equalizer hitch downward. It was riding "almost" level but probably putting more stress on the rear axle

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Benefits of AACA Membership.

In the past (13) years - I have spent a minimum of (4000) days on the road towing a car hauler trailer.

 

I don’t carry power tools to do repairs on my car hauler trailer or my tow vehicle.

 

I have changed by hand - in weather ranging from 5 to 120 degrees Farenheit:

 

Tires

Axles - Idler and Braker

Leaf Springs

Equalizers

Brake Backing Plates

Brake Drums

Wheel Bearings

Wheel Bearing Races

 

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regardless of what the weight ratings of truck, trailer and/or combination, triple axles is a mandatory Class A CDL in CA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, mdsbob said:

Regardless of what the weight ratings of truck, trailer and/or combination, triple axles is a mandatory Class A CDL in CA.

mdsbob, can you please give us a CVC reference for this statement?  I've been going by the chart inside the front cover of CA's Commercial Driver Handbook, 2017-2018 edition, which does not address number of axles, only the GVW of the trailer.  A Class C licensee can tow up to 9,999 lb gross, according to this DMV publication. 

 

My older trailer, sold pending payment, has three 3500-lb axles and is rated at 9.990 lbs. gross.

 

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Grimy,

The CA Commercial Drivers Handbook (on the CA DMV site) current issue is the 2017-2018 version. It has been revised since I was looking up requirements in 2014.

It is not as clearly defined as I remember it being in 2014.

But if you look at the sheet where they have columns headings "You May Drive", "And You May Tow" and "Examples" (the Examples column has pic-to-grams).

The only 3 axle trailer example in the pic-to-grams is listed with Class A Commercial License. That truck/trailer combination is a large 18 wheeler type rig.

I will be the first to admit that as listed in the current Commercial Drivers Handbook it could be subject to interpretation.

I would think that if you didn't have a commercial Class A and CHP wanted to issue citation it would be in an uphill battle with that.

As a side note, I find it interesting that in CA (even on interstate) for any vehicle pulling a trailer the speed limit is 55 mph.

My observation was that I appeared to be the only one that was adhering to that law.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, mdsbob said:

Grimy,

The CA Commercial Drivers Handbook (on the CA DMV site) current issue is the 2017-2018 version. It has been revised since I was looking up requirements in 2014.

It is not as clearly defined as I remember it being in 2014.

But if you look at the sheet where they have columns headings "You May Drive", "And You May Tow" and "Examples" (the Examples column has pic-to-grams).

The only 3 axle trailer example in the pic-to-grams is listed with Class A Commercial License. That truck/trailer combination is a large 18 wheeler type rig.

I will be the first to admit that as listed in the current Commercial Drivers Handbook it could be subject to interpretation.

I would think that if you didn't have a commercial Class A and CHP wanted to issue citation it would be in an uphill battle with that.

As a side note, I find it interesting that in CA (even on interstate) for any vehicle pulling a trailer the speed limit is 55 mph.

My observation was that I appeared to be the only one that was adhering to that law.

I'll rely on the words, not the pictograms--especially since there is no room for pictograms of all the possible trailer permutations.  I do carry a photocopy of the chart page with my registration and insurance paperwork, just in case. But what REALLY counts is whatever is written in the Calif Vehicle Code.  Frankly, I have not looked it up, and have been relying on that chart and its predecessors all these years.  As a former federal regulatory employee, I'm inclined to ask for the specific CVC section--which has to be written on any citation anyway--and THEN read all the associated paragraphs including "applicability" and "exemptions" which are usually (but not always) a bit upstream in the book, looking for the proverbial Get Out of Jail Free card.

 

It's fairly standard for trailer manufacturers to "administratively downgrade" the trailer capacity at the request of the ordering party--for example, a friend recently took delivery of a special-order enclosed trailer with two 6,000 lbs axles, but the VIN sticker says the GVWR is 9.990 lbs., thus making it lawfully towable by the holder of a Class C (i.e., passenger car) driver's license--so long as the ACTUAL loaded gross weight doesn't exceed the sticker number.  BTW, that same Class C license allows the holder to drive a prime mover of up to 26,000 lbs (e.g., motor home) and STILL tow up to 9.999 lbs--and THAT can be frightening, as I'm sure you've seen.

 

As to your speed limit comment, I agree.  I may run 60 with a trailer on straight-as-an-arrow I-5 in California, but no more.  Illinois *used* to have a 55 mph speed limit for trailers, but that's been gone (or at least the signs are) the last five years or so, but I'm unaware of any other states with that limit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can’t drive 55! I have two tags on my trailer one for 24k and the other for 15k, next time I will get one for 9999. The companies are happy to oblige, and as long as you place them in different spots, it isn’t an issue. 

 

Oops- make that 21k.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So what do you do in Ca. if you have a 3 axle fifth wheel camper rig ?

I've seen them come thru town and there is usually a boat behind them. = "triple tow".

 

Mike in Colorado

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To make things more complicated, in order for states to get Chapter 70 Federal Funds, all states have adopted the language in the federal DOT regulations.........and that exempts non commercial use under 26k, so if your on thr federal highway system, your ok, even if the state law conflicts with the federal motor carrier rules. Just don’t stop to get gas!

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now