ron hausmann

Woodward Dream Cruise

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Probably doesn't help they took Votech/ shop class out of schools,  so guys don't know a thing about mechanical work or even how to wet their feet for those that aren't born into a Mechanical family.  It's easier for the counselors to push college degrees in liberal arts than to see the value in teaching a trade. 

We also have another 50 years of cars to pick from that they didn't have 50 years ago and as mentioned think of the offerings of the mid 70's to early 90's from the dealer compared to Today's offerings.  

Of course from the literature I sell and get to look at.  the auto manufactures use to really push education about mechanical things.  I suspect few do now.   What was better than Chevrolet coming up with the corvette then sending all kinds of stuff to schools about the engineering and construction of it along with the whole parade of Progress?  

I doubt any of the big manufactures promote stuff like that anymore,  except at maybe the college level and even then I would bet it's much more minimal. 

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

2 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

My takeaways:

  1. Most people believe that new Mustangs/Camaros/Corvettes/Challengers are collector cars.
  2. Most people want cars that are painless to own and drive, and are getting more insistent on having power steering and A/C. Even young people who could handle an older car want conveniences. If your mother drove a car in the early '50s, she's actually more of a man than most men in late-model muscle cars today.
  3. Most people think old cars aren't reliable or are unusable in the modern world, or they are afraid of driving in traffic with something that doesn't have ABS and airbags, or that old cars are a death trap.
  4. Most people equate fast with fun. Slow can't possibly be fun so why own a slow car?
  5. Most people do not know how to drive a manual transmission, let alone something without synchronizers.
  6. Most people have zero vision or imagination and only want what they see around them. As more late-model cars fill shows (and fewer old cars show up), it becomes a self-reinforcing feedback loop.
  7. Being able to buy a brand new "collector car" at the dealer and have low monthly payments and a warranty is more desirable than buying an old car that they are just sure will always break down.
  8. Spending money is preferable to doing anything yourself. Most "customized" late-model cars consist of bolt-on parts that were engineered by someone else. If you have a credit card, you can make a totally unique late-model "collector" car that's just like everyone else's. You can also buy stickers--that's fun.
  9. Guys who drive Model Ts seem to have the most fun of all.

 

 

The Ohio Model T Jamboree gets around 100 Model Ts every year. Done the last three in our 1911. Lots of families participating. Wonderful time! Unfortunately I have to miss this year due to wedding of good non car friend.

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All -

       they are reporting that there were about 1.5 million people lining the street or cruising between eight mile road and Pontiac, which is the 12 mile stretch of Woodward which is generally the “Dream Cruise” circuit. And 40,000 cars. How can you describe this? 

       My grandchildren and I were counting languages we heard. Our spot was at 14 1/2 mile and Woodward. We heard 15 separate languages spoken. I talked to many people who come here from around the world just to be part of this automotive celebration. Mostly Asian, European, and middle eastern. They all loved the Gold Bugs side seats!

      Ron

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2 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

Probably doesn't help they took Votech/ shop class out of schools,  so guys don't know a thing about mechanical work or even how to wet their feet for those that aren't born into a Mechanical family.  It's easier for the counselors to push college degrees in liberal arts than to see the value in teaching a trade. 

 

I'm a high school liberal arts teacher, and you're mostly right, but most schools are pushing STEM degrees (science, technology, engineering, math), at least in Michigan.  Unfortunately, few of these students (at my school anyway) are truly interested in anything mechanical.  Those who want to be engineers seem to go into it, to some extent, due to the perception of a comfortable lifestyle more than any burning interest in how things work (not that I blame them).  The medical field seems really popular right now.  Times change...  Cars are more reliable, so you don't have to get to know them by working on them on a regular basis.  Most schools don't have auto shop (which is partially a chicken and egg deal), so they're not exposed to cars there.  I think quite a few kids like the modern stuff, some like older stuff, but it's never going to be like it was when my dad was a kid, or even when I was a kid, when 5.0 Mustangs were really popular.   

 

This year's graduating class had a refreshing number of kids going into the trades, like welding and construction.  Few mechanics.  I'd still say it was under 10 percent.  I hope things get better in the future; I try to sell the trades to interested students whenever I can.

Edited by Aaron65 (see edit history)
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5 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Guys who drive Model Ts seem to have the most fun of all.

 

Jay Leno said the Model T is the best antique car to own. Inexpensive, cool antique look and parts availability. I've seen T coupes on Ebay in drive away condition, unrestored but serviceable for 8000.

 

I'd love to have a Model S boat tail roadster, but I don't think they are too inexpensive.

 

image.thumb.png.27388fa669f8b81a65feeee537482629.png

 

I'd like to do the Woodward cruise, but steam cars don't like parades or traffic jams. Gotta keep the fuel moving or she carbons up.

 

-Ron

Edited by Locomobile (see edit history)

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All,

      If you ever do take your oldies to the Woodward Dream Cruise in Michigan, the “cruising” is much better the entire week beforehand!

     The actual Saturday Of the Woodward Dream Cruise is a 12 mile long traffic jam, unsuitable for old cars that need to move. But Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday late afternoons and evenings before Saturday are PERFECT for cruising. That’s when many of us go!

     Regardless, it is one bucket-list act9vity that you all need to look into in my opinion. It’s a blast.

     Ron Hausmann P.E.

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