mickthecat

19" 6 Lug Wire Wheels

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Any idea hat these fit? There were snap rings originally but these are now gone. Any value here? Thanks for looking.

19_6o01.thumb.jpg.0c3c8e147a1d6fbb64f666453ceea0c1.jpg19_6o02.thumb.jpg.1cd9d00a5e16c892d66bf1584869b7d5.jpg

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I count 72 spokes (24 outer, 48 inner), so that may be a clue. Bolt spacing may help further, likely from a pricey car, 1920's.

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Comparing the back side of this wheel with the other one posted by the same person I think this wheel might be a centre lock type and the holes are just for locating pins - maybe?

 

I wonder if there is a maker's mark on the wheel somewhere.

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By looks the "center hub" looks familiar to me, very similar to 1928 and 29 Essex  plus others.

 the diameter of the bolt circle looks like  6 holes on a 6 inch circle. Is that correct?

 

Many cars used 6 bolts, but diameter of circle is the clincher here.

 

If I recall correctly, Wolverine is one that used 72 spokes with 6 bolts on a 6  inch circle on a 19 inch wheel.

 

With proper dimensions of bolt circle I maybe able to ID your wheel.

But my info does not always provide number of spokes.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

The 1929 Peerless 6-61 and 6-81 models used 6-lug wheels on those with wire wheels, I believe, and the 6-81 did use a 19" wheel. The 8-125 model appeared to have used 8-lug wheels.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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Thanks to all who replied.

I wonder if these are the 1929 Essex wheels I bought several years ago - I thought I had gotten rid of them.  IIRC, Essex wheels were held in place with lug nuts as opposed to a center-lock hub. 

If these are Essex wheels they're probably worth more as "yard art" than anything, especially with the snap rings gone.

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Those are pin drives and not lug nuts. 

Hudson went to lug nuts in 29. 

They could be for a 28 hudson but I’m not sure if hudson used 19” in 28.

In 29 yes. 

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In 1929 both Hudson and Essex used the same bolts to hold wire wheels on to drums .

Essex six ( 6 ) bolts and Hudson seven ( 7 ) bolts.

 

Some other vehicles may have used pins, but they usually have flush mounted contact surfaces .

 

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I have and have had both types of Hudson and Essex wheels and others.

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Still waiting for the dimension  of the bolt circle of the 6 bolt holes.

 

The list of vehicles 

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still waiting for Mickthecat to supply more info on his wheels, bolt hole diameter, width of tire seat area.

Perhaps it will help id them.

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Peerlis  27 to 29    80, 81  used  19" x 4"     6/6 "

Essex    for 1929 used 20" wheels with 6 bolts on a 6" circle

Hudson for 1929 used 19" wheels 

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Other  vehicles using 6 bolts on 6 inch circle for a 19" wheel.

DeSoto, Durant, Graham,  Nash , Pontiac, Hup, Peerlis, Essex,  and others.

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Some differences are:

width of tire rim ( bead to bead) 2 3/4 "  to  5"

snap rings vs non snap ring wheels

Number of spokes, for inner and or outer rim

Fully adjustable spokes vs welded to one of two points

 

There are lots of variations

 

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They look very similar to the wheels on my 1929 Hupmobile but the center hole looks smaller?

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In all cases the width of tire rim  is important.

The  bead to bead measurement is sometimes listed for vehicles by model and engine.

 The info I have has a range from  2 3/4 "  t 5" wide for tire seating.

 

so what is your measurement?

I will see if It will help you.

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