Matt Harwood

1933 Buick 90 Series Club Sedan

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Matt -- thanks for your elaboration.  Nice to know that there may be a little life left in the pre-war sedan market, although it's hard not to wonder if most of the audience for such items is now either on the wrong side of the grass or convinced that they're shortly headed that way.

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10 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Well, I didn't really mean that it would be profitable, only that you could sort it and perform some modest restoration work, and those chores should pay for themselves, more or less. I think the car is desirable and while it doesn't justify a full restoration, I don't think it's at peak value, either. Detail the engine bay, make everything work properly, perhaps freshen a few chrome pieces like the grille, new tires; those are all things that would add enough value to justify doing them. That's all I meant.

 

Ultimately you'd have one of the best-looking closed Buicks that's also a Full Classic, and arguably one of the better road cars of the period. As I said, I'd own that car today if I hadn't wasted all my savings buying a similar Full Classic club sedan that promptly cratered itself in a most expensive way. Yeah, I'd be sorting it, buffing it, and driving the hell out of that Buick next spring. 

 

Just for comparison, this car sold well into the six-figure range not too long ago. And it's brown.

1934-Buick-Series-90_000GK_460x369.jpg

 

 

Heck, this carnival of a Buick brought twice the asking price of the black car I mentioned (I don't care that it was made for the Queen, it's a disaster):

1933-Buick-Series-90-_000BA_459x307.jpg

And that is why they serve alcohol at auctions?

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8 hours ago, Buickborn said:

 Nice to know that there may be a little life left in the pre-war sedan market, although it's hard not to wonder if most of the audience for such items is now either on the wrong side of the grass or convinced that they're shortly headed that way.

 

The 1933/34 club sedans here are surely classics and should be great drivers. As to the market for prewar sedans, they're a hard sell. I purchased my '29 McLaughlin-Buick close-coupled sedan because I always liked the look of them, not even thinking about making money (which I won't). The younger generation barely give it a second glance, but I enjoy it.For now that's what counts.

IMG_1463.JPG

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J.H. -- That is one handsome Buick!  Unfortunately, I think the general appreciation for such elegant items has fallen victim to our casual, youth-dominated era.  That is, it appears that the sought-after vehicles are those which seem personal and youthful as opposed to those intended for families or for making a proper arrival at the opera.  Surely that disdain for maturity hasn't always been the case.  

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39 minutes ago, Buickborn said:

 for making a proper arrival at the opera.    

 Actually,I bought it because I've always been a fan of old gangster movies,as my avatar shows !

Bonnie and Clyde er Jim 2.jpg

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Gangster movies . . . how did they get those narrow, high-profile cars to take corners so fast without capsizing?  You don't suppose it had anything to do with film speed, do you?

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On 1/21/2020 at 10:52 PM, Matt Harwood said:

Well, I didn't really mean that it would be profitable, only that you could sort it and perform some modest restoration work, and those chores should pay for themselves, more or less. I think the car is desirable and while it doesn't justify a full restoration, I don't think it's at peak value, either. Detail the engine bay, make everything work properly, perhaps freshen a few chrome pieces like the grille, new tires; those are all things that would add enough value to justify doing them. That's all I meant.

 

Ultimately you'd have one of the best-looking closed Buicks that's also a Full Classic, and arguably one of the better road cars of the period. As I said, I'd own that car today if I hadn't wasted all my savings buying a similar Full Classic club sedan that promptly cratered itself in a most expensive way. Yeah, I'd be sorting it, buffing it, and driving the hell out of that Buick next spring. 

 

Just for comparison, this car sold well into the six-figure range not too long ago. And it's brown.

1934-Buick-Series-90_000GK_460x369.jpg

 

 

Heck, this carnival of a Buick brought twice the asking price of the black car I mentioned (I don't care that it was made for the Queen, it's a disaster):

1933-Buick-Series-90-_000BA_459x307.jpg

That red Buick is what my grandfather use to call a CIRCUS WAGON.

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On 1/21/2020 at 8:24 AM, alsancle said:

 

Can't be Massachusetts.   What is the cost of shipping to Eastern Europe and what are the labor rates in dollars?   Here is anywhere from 60-100/hr.

shipping cost container 3000 labor 10-15$ in hour. 

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On 1/21/2020 at 8:24 AM, alsancle said:

 

Can't be Massachusetts.   What is the cost of shipping to Eastern Europe and what are the labor rates in dollars?   Here is anywhere from 60-100/hr.

shipping cost container 3000 labor 10-15$ in hour. 

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if anyone have any 1933 Buick 90 or 80 series please let me know. still need 2 cars 

Dav

Cell 414 six3O 2853

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53 minutes ago, Davlet said:

if anyone have any 1933 Buick 90 or 80 series please let me know. still need 2 cars 

Dav

Cell 414 six3O 2853


cornering the market?

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1 hour ago, alsancle said:


cornering the market?


Nope.....cutting them up for South America where they run a vintage speedster class with the platform........

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Is anyone besides me having trouble making any sense whatsoever of the previous half-dozen or so posts?

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I think a couple of previous posts were deleted which loses the context of the last posts.

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On 1/22/2020 at 3:26 PM, Buickborn said:

Unfortunately, I think the general appreciation for such elegant items has fallen victim to our casual, youth-dominated era.

 

Yep, that's what they said in the early 1970's when I came along. I had some interest in a few 25 year old cars at , but they were called "Special Interest" because they weren't really what the Grand Puba  had declared as proper.

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I looked for about 20 years in the 1990s and 2000s for a 1933 Buick 90 series sedan with built in trunk and could find nothing but a costly project car that was mostly a shell with an asking price of $20,000.  It is too late now as I already have three 1933 Buick Victoria Coupes (80 and 90 series) and a 4-door sedan 50 series. Yet, that milk chocolate Club sedan at 138 inch wheelbase with that long hood is magnificent and so well put together.   

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New home found a 1933 buick 

For 23k$ was sold

20200128_1652221.jpg

20200128_1653281.jpg

20200128_1653421.jpg

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15 minutes ago, Davlet said:

New home found a 1933 buick 

For 23k$ was sold

20200128_1652221.jpg

20200128_1653281.jpg

20200128_1653421.jpg

 

That looks like a 32 too me.

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Joe Puleo just posted a great period picture of a 33 series 90 over in this thread:

 

 

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