Jump to content

1939 Cadillac 60S "Sunshine Special" *SOLD*


Recommended Posts

000H.thumb.jpg.334544a3b7d94c7302e31d55f1862bb5.jpg

 

*SOLD* I have long believed that if I could have just one hobby car, I would choose a pre-war Cadillac 60 Special. They are the utility infielder of the old car world: reliable, comfortable, fast, stylish, and welcome at virtually every event. This particular 1939 60S is one of only 280 built with the "Sunshine Turret Top" option, which is basically a sliding metal sunroof. It also has dual sidemounts, which I find attractive on the '39-40 models, giving them a sense of gravitas. If you look at the cowl tag on this one, you'll note it was a special-order (denoted by the "SO" on the trim and a blank paint code). Documentation with the car hints that it was originally two-tone green with a green leather interior and given the unusual combination and the CCCA Senior Premier badge it wears, it's probably pretty close. That same documentation states that parts of it were repainted by the previous owner to make it all one color--if you look closely at the photos, you'll note that the top color is just slightly off, so my conclusion is that it was two-tone and that the top was merely a different shade of green. I should also note that greens and turquoise colors are extremely hard for digital cameras to process for some reason--I honestly did not notice that the top was a different color until I saw the photos. It is not at all apparent in person, even outdoors in the sunlight. It's pretty, but if you have concerns that you may not like it, come and see it in person--we tried to get the color as correct as possible, but as I said, greens like this just don't cooperate with digital imagery.

 

Anyway, it's a nice car. The restoration is probably approaching 20 years old at this point and I believe the 13,217 miles on the odometer are since the restoration was completed. It has spent the entirety of its life in Texas and Oklahoma, so rust is a non-issue and the heavy wooden body sills that define the 60S are rock solid. The doors close with that wonderful solid ker-CHUNK sound and the chrome is in very good to excellent condition, with minimal pitting and no cracks in the very crack-prone grille. It is fitted with an accessory grille guard and fog lights, which are currently configured as the front turn signal indicators. There are matching spare tires and wheels in each of the sidemount compartments.

 

If I had to guess, I would say the green leather interior is original. It's not nice enough to be just 13,000 miles of wear, particularly in the back seat, but it's also not worn out or tired. The seats are firm and comfortable, the leather has a bit of creasing but no splits, tears, or other defects, and aside from a little scuffing on the piping where the driver slides in, it's really, really nice. The carpets are surely newer and I suspect the headliner has been replaced in order to service the sunroof, which slides easily once you figure out what it likes and how it works. The steering wheel, woodgrained dashboard, and all the instruments have been restored and all the gauges work properly, although there's a modern temperature gauge under the dash that supplants the factory unit. The heater and defroster are dealer-installed under-dash units (typical for cars delivered to warm climates) and they, too, are fully operational. The radio powers up and hums and pulls in static, but I have not been able to tune a station, but that might just be an antenna issue, I don't know. Clock is not working. The trunk is neatly finished with correct materials and the tool tray in the back is original and completely rust-free. There is no spare because, of course, it has sidemounts (my first thought when I opened the trunk was, "Dang, no spare." Duh!).

 

This car has obviously been a favorite tour car for some years, and the way it runs proves it. The 346 cubic inch V8 starts quickly without any special procedures and idles nearly silently--just a little wooshing from the fan and belt. It's neatly detailed with correct Cadillac Green paint on the flathead, a proper oil bath air cleaner feeding the original carburetor, and factory manifolds with some porcelain still clinging to their surface. Tidy, but not quite ready for show. Nice details include original-style hose clamps and plug wires, and decals. Pulls well through all the gears and cruises easily at 60 MPH. Newer exhaust with two mufflers, auxiliary electric fuel pump (I've never had to use it), and no notable deviations from stock on the nicely detailed undercarriage. Rides and handles like it should, tight and quiet, ideal for touring. Tires are 6.00-16 whitewalls, but I bet they're as old as the restoration and a set of radials would make this car sublime.

 

Extras include an owner's manual, shop manual, and a magazine where this was the cover car, plus a full jack assembly.

 

I've owned a half-dozen 60 Specials, including another '39 that I liked quite a bit. This one is considerably nicer than that one, and the sunroof really does make things pleasant out on the road. Asking price is $37,900 and you get a turn-key tour car that's ready to enjoy immediately and which should give you many years of happy motoring. I know every time I get one of these I'm tempted to keep it. That's how good these cars can be. Thanks for looking!

 

001.thumb.JPG.3728bdda1503273ef8653438b690e076.JPG003.thumb.JPG.48984a6864eff61ea4076601c3ad9fab.JPG006.thumb.JPG.69dd322003101a55afc262e74d8f09a8.JPG008.thumb.JPG.ced6615e8bb0e28ff6087a6297c67935.JPG

 

021.thumb.JPG.3ff3665addbcbdee1a43b4aa0307e07f.JPG025.thumb.JPG.30ab39c13ddf74030b12d2470522d825.JPG030.thumb.jpg.95e6d481d16037bc2a6b800ebaecbedd.jpg039.thumb.JPG.97afd11835cf536a15387624e39c3059.JPG

 

040.thumb.JPG.77a1fc0f8b405a1816eec2207c86ef31.JPG042.thumb.JPG.4ac2cad1184902915164d17eac00a41c.JPG046.thumb.JPG.a2961513ef576e53e2c77e304a303ddc.JPG048.thumb.JPG.97bed1afe4128e56f7676b3d3562102e.JPG

 

050.thumb.JPG.1a6db4c428fb6eea1661b38b75bd15ae.JPG052.thumb.JPG.fd3d0dcea3bb57271c822b815f9f3c5a.JPG059.thumb.JPG.243b088a4037ad16d3bbe338982993e9.JPG067.thumb.JPG.c088451319bb245fe943449bb1688f1a.JPG

 

077.thumb.jpg.ba7eab2d293af8c1971c36015393dee7.jpg080.thumb.JPG.145819e2ae7e4f93df3fe98289c4a8d0.JPG086.thumb.JPG.e822a278263b01a50d45e7c25963f3f8.JPG088.thumb.JPG.82867c4f8a6914a034a61be844f5b7bc.JPG

 

096.thumb.jpg.ac13ca2a266cc8565ddbe638aa5565b6.jpg100.thumb.jpg.3cd8dda3e088cd47fb8b36089079f54e.jpg106.thumb.jpg.4b3a990184e2b8c4523cd63848368a00.jpg108.thumb.jpg.641b1b27e0b7facb0245277bb22ee509.jpg

 

109.thumb.jpg.5184d56ad5a01f642d55c9bf080da5c8.jpg110.thumb.jpg.a3b98e890a68f586a06b04ec40c261e1.jpg111.JPG

 

 

Here's the car outside in the sunlight and you can see that the colors are much better than when under the harsh lights in the studio and viewed through the digital camera.

 

20190729_134610a.thumb.jpg.5dedf0fcbc9b8725030b269a80317b0c.jpg3960S1.thumb.jpg.aa7012396766829615f02d39834cff30.jpg20190729_100949.thumb.jpg.084c9edc5d300a63ce8dad0609b9b9b5.jpg

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Perhaps leather was not available on the 60 Special from the factory , but if was on special order or requested by a customer would the salesman/dealership say "no"? and loose a sale? There was a Cadillac dealership in Glen Cove on the north shore of long island ( Paddison Motors) that sold a lot of Cadillacs and LaSalles in the pre war era and many were ordered with non factory accessories such as leather tops and interiors when new by customers who had the $ to do so. I saw some of their ledgers/order books 40+ years ago with notes written in for special requests that were indeed filled.

The Derham Body Company also reupholstered cars at customers request or by the request of a dealer.

Matt, that car you have is outstanding, someone will wind up with an excellent car from you.

WG

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

"SO" on the trim tag means "Special Order." I have not been able to find what trim code 6953 indicates, but if I were a gambling man, I'd bet it's green leather from another model or year.

 

Tag1.thumb.jpg.db996e44d01a8bf13a95be2acab97526.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did find a photo with the two-tone, which seems to date from 2012. Appears that only the top was painted. The magazine where it appears on the cover shows it in monotone, so it was painted sometime in late 2012 or early 2013.

 

PrePaint.thumb.jpg.5223c678d5b7939901a51e0e05ab157d.jpg

 

20190806_165130.thumb.jpg.3b28a58feed7601fd6ed4dcc40873d43.jpg20190806_165154.thumb.jpg.51cfbe274abd014d0fdd01c0283fefaa.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Derham  Body Company was doing actual restorations and upgrades post war. There is a 1936 Pierce eight sedan they “restored” and did a modern style interior and other details, the car is now in Florida.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Took the 60S to lunch today. For the two guys who asked about the paint mismatch (I sent you these photos via PM as well), here it is out in the sun. It's far less obvious without the harsh studio lights and digital camera eye, although this is admittedly my cell phone's digital eye. The color looks FAR more consistent in person than in the photos and these shots pretty accurately reflect how it actually looks, including the color.

 

Oh, and it also drives beautifully. Took it on the highway at 55-60 MPH. Smooth, almost silent, lots of torque, GREAT brakes, sits in traffic at 160 degrees on the gauge, and that sunroof really makes it pleasant inside with a nice breeze but not windy or loud at all. This is going to make someone a great tour car. I will be sad to see it go.

 

Lunch1.thumb.jpg.8d61d9014b054a16050ca08cffe42205.jpgLunch2.thumb.jpg.1822d95563f45218cbb3b59e2ac54884.jpg
 

Parked in front of the shop this afternoon for traffic to admire:

 

Lunch3.thumb.jpg.f1aba1bb296c583a74edee86bde4ca60.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/7/2019 at 4:03 PM, Matt Harwood said:

"SO" on the trim tag means "Special Order." I have not been able to find what trim code 6953 indicates, but if I were a gambling man, I'd bet it's green leather from another model or year.

 

Tag1.thumb.jpg.db996e44d01a8bf13a95be2acab97526.jpg

 

6953 is the Special Order number.  Those numbers were assigned sequentially by Cadillac.  The SO number has nothing to do with the actual trim or paint codes.   It has been my experience that whenever there is an SO number on the body tag, the trim and paint codes are omitted from the body tag.  The details of the SO could possibly be found on the factory invoice (not the case for all SOs) which you can get from the GM Heritage Center for $50.  You are likely correct about the leather interior being the special order.

 

HTH,

Jeff

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you Jeff, couldn't have stated it better myself. I love the AACA Forums, they are so good at helping members and readers ( who should be members!) but there are a lot of opinions out there that perhaps are not so accurate when it comes to facts. All who express same are well meaning but perhaps should do some more diligent research before sharing what they know to all who may look at this and point to it and say " well it says so there so it has to be right". I am not criticizing anyone, just suggest, in fact to all to "do your homework". PLEASE

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/7/2019 at 3:34 PM, RICHELIEUMOTORCAR said:

Oh My Goodness what a car! The first year 38 60 Special is one of my all time favorite Pre War 2 sedans, I have a nicely restored 38 60 Special which I take to local cruise nights. That sunshine top is rare to find today. I have a 40 60 Special and a 39 LaSalle both with that sliding roof. The 60 Special also has a division window. I need another car like I need a Goat, however, if I was in the market, I would like to have it. Love that color combo. By the way, that leather interior was redone. Leather was not available on a 60 Special.

 

The 60 Special was the Whopper of the Cadillac line. You could have it your way. Special order. Custom colors. Leather interior. Extra trim. Padded tops. Side mounts. Just about anything one can think of could be ordered done to a 60 Special. All at extra cost of course.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On ‎8‎/‎9‎/‎2019 at 1:20 PM, Jeff Hansen said:

 

6953 is the Special Order number.  Those numbers were assigned sequentially by Cadillac.  The SO number has nothing to do with the actual trim or paint codes.   It has been my experience that whenever there is an SO number on the body tag, the trim and paint codes are omitted from the body tag.  The details of the SO could possibly be found on the factory invoice (not the case for all SOs) which you can get from the GM Heritage Center for $50.  You are likely correct about the leather interior being the special order.

 

HTH,

Jeff

Jeff is correct.  I am a former owner of a true SO Cadillac and I am a Cadillac LaSalle Club member.  Once Cadillac put SO on a tag, the numbers in and around it are virtually meaningless.  It also in theory allows an owner of an SO car a true "hall pass" to do whatever they want with the car and present it at a CLC National meet and not get any flack.  Want to paint it a totally funky pink?  In theory you are covered as far as judging.  

 

In my opinion what it was originally (two tone) is irrelevant as far as authenticity.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice car. Many years ago I took my wife to her first classic car auction. Now she has always supported my car obsession but has no real interest herself. Well we had just gone to the auction as spectators but then she saw one of these with the sunshine top and a divider window and she loved it! She started encouraging me to bid on it so we could go into the wedding limo business - at first I thought she was kidding but she was serious. I think it sold for about $10,000 and at that time I could hardly rub two sticks together... She still reminds me of this "lost opportunity" to this day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, TexRiv_63 said:

Nice car. Many years ago I took my wife to her first classic car auction. Now she has always supported my car obsession but has no real interest herself. Well we had just gone to the auction as spectators but then she saw one of these with the sunshine top and a divider window and she loved it! She started encouraging me to bid on it so we could go into the wedding limo business - at first I thought she was kidding but she was serious. I think it sold for about $10,000 and at that time I could hardly rub two sticks together... She still reminds me of this "lost opportunity" to this day.

 

I remain convinced that there are lucrative business opportunities for someone with a reliable old sedan to go into the wedding business. Yes, I know, insurance might be a little expensive, but weddings are almost completely recession-proof and budgets are often non-existent so the sky's the limit. We can't rent out cars we're selling, but we've started renting out our personal cars for photo shoots--I drive them and park them, then take them home a few hours later and a few hundred dollars richer. Wondering what to do with a frumpy old 1930s or '40s sedan? Weddings. Work Saturday evening and I bet you could earn $700-1000 a week. These brides will pay. Drive them a short distance, let them take their photos, nothing stressful for you or the car. As long as the car is reliable and attractive, go for it. Seriously, we must get a dozen calls a week from young women looking for something cool for their wedding. We don't do it simply for time and personnel reasons, but if you're a retired guy with a few extra hours Saturday night, it could be a nice little gig.

 

1459970128_686b6d98-41f3-11e5-9816-22000aa61a3ers_729.jpg.193563b8b4df637347512592999495b5.jpg

 

static1.squarespace_com5.thumb.jpe.816306cf7bf0afbf4602f7e1b6c4f333.jpe.2e8a8483fdebcb4c5728b5768b1a9908.jpe

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

30 years ago a friend of mine who is a restorer and I gave serious consideration to the wedding business.   We would have outsourced to the limo companies,  so we would not have had a retail operations.  By the time we had figured our way through all the math,  it really isn't as lucrative as you would think.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...