Sir Dragon

Split Rim and Tool

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Hello all,

I've done some looking around and my research still leaves me a bit unsure. I'm still very new to this, as I've taken up the torch on refurbishing my fathers 1926 Chevy "Huckster" truck.

 

I have what appear to be a Jaxon type split rim with rotating/locking tab. They measure 20" across the ID.

Though, particular features on my rims are slightly different from the ones I've seen and read about on this forum and elsewhere.

 

More importantly, I'm looking for the correct tool for compressing the rim. I assume an Atlas might do the trick, but the rim appears to have holes that might be for a differently configured tool.

There are hole in the rim on opposing sides as if to accept a tool that would lever the rim to a compressed position (I speculate).

If I can't get my hands on a tool, then direction to a shop that can change these tires in the NJ area would be the next best thing.

 

Tires that coming off are beyond dry-rotten (round on the top and permanently flat on the bottom). Though surprisingly, they took and held enough air to roll the hulk in and out of the garage a short time ago.

These "original" tires are marked 30x5 (Dunlop and Atlas), and I have 600-20 replacements at the ready once the rims are freed to be cleaned and painted.

 

I can spin the tab and get the split separated with generic prying, but can't get beyond that without a tool, and I don't want to rig something that winds up being shaky and takes a finger.

 

The correct tool to use, a safe alternative method, or a reputable shop would be most helpful.

 

Thanks,

James

 

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There may be a tool to use the two holes in the rim, but the tool I use is a split rim tool.

 

Go to EBay, enter "vintage split rim tool", you will see several for sale. (None are mine)

Two of my automobiles had 30 by 5 tires which translates to 20 inch rim by 5 inch width.

6.00 may be to wide for your rim?

 

the movable screw portion is usually placed 4 or 5 inches away from the split in the rim.

the other two legs are spread apart to spread the load on the rim.

rotate handle to cause the rim to be drawn in toward the center, just enough to release it from the tire and permit it to be spiraled out of tire.

 

The split rim, using the tool, can be rotated (screwed ) into the new tire, watching for the valve stem placement.

 

The tool  can be cranked to force rim into position so you can use movable locking pivot to engage.

Not a hard job at all, good luck.

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Hi James,

I have worked on 1927-9 Chev's and they all had Jaxon type split rims such as the ones you have pictured. You have to spin the tab as you have done and then pry the split to get one side to start contracting over the other. You will then need a split rim tool, with 3 legs that you use to contract the rim inwards to remove the tire. Be warned even with the tool be very careful of your fingers. With the tool, lots of patience and trial and error and also lots of swearing, you will master changing these tires.

 Try contacting fillingstation.com or earlychevparts.com for a split rim tool.

 I would also ask , is your huckster a 4 cylinder or 6 cylinder car?  My reason for asking is that all Chev's built before 1929 were 4 cyl cars, (with the exception of a V8 in the late teens), then from 1929 onwards they were 6 cyl vehicles. If your car IS 1926 and 4 cyl, then it may have been upgraded to 1929 wheels.

  Coker tire list a 440 x 21 inch tire for 1926 and 1927. My own experience has shown the 1927 had 440 x 21 tires and 1928 takes a 450 x 21 inch tire. The 1928 split rim is wider than the 1927. The 1929 takes a 450 x 20 tire and by 1930 they had moved to 19 inch.

 Your old tires are 30 x 5 which is now a 500 x 20, these may have been what was available at the time they were replaced, and should be considered a max size for your rims, I think fitting 600 x 20's will be too big for your rims.

 Hope this info is useful to you, best regards

Viv.

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Thank you all.

 

Regarding the tool; This is the information I've been finding.

I just wasn't sure if the Hercules or Atlas would work on ANY split rim, or of they were designed for a specific type. Most of the references I found showed it being used on the Ford style rim (like above from Tin Indian). Plus I was curious about the holes.

Thanks for the confirmation.

 

Viv W - Don't have much history on the truck. It is a straight 4 cylinder. All paperwork points to '26.

VIN is 12X5222 - if you have a decoder ring ;)

So much for trusting the conversion of the tire company that assured me 600x20 was the replacement for 30x5.

When she's road worthy I'll worry more about the right size tire (these new ones may dry rot by then).

At this point I'm looking for enough mobility to roll her in and out of the garage for work. Space is very limited.

She's in rough shape but largely in tact, and there's a long way to go.

 

Regards,

James

 

 

 

 

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Dragon - I'm in NJ (Middlesex County) and have an Atlas split rim tool available if you're interested.
I've used a tire outfit that readily handled my Budd 20" split ring tires from my '40 Ford, they do a lot of farm/truck stuff... tho your rims might be beyond them. Champion Tire in Ringoes NJ.

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More confusion on the term “split rims”. These rims are more a “demountable rim” type rim.

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As your truck is a Chevy there is a good chance of picking up a manual for it at a reasonable price. There is probably good instructions on tire changing in the manual. And probably an illustration of the factory rim tool. 

 

Greg in Canada

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7 hours ago, stakeside said:

More confusion on the term “split rims”. These rims are more a “demountable rim” type rim.

A drop center rim can also be a demountable rim.

It is virtually impossible to be hurt with a split rim.

"SPLIT' rim is the most commonly misused term in truck and auto nomenclature.  Many images on the internet, and stories about split rim "explosions" and dangerous incidents are using the wrong term.    A two or three piece rim is a totally different beast.  These are the ones often referred to a 'widow makers" and are absolutely dangerous if not inflated in a cage, wrapped with a cable/chain or otherwise contained.  Millions of these have been safely inflated but a few hundred that have injured fools are the ones you hear about.

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Just how universal is the pacific rim tool?  Larger and smaller models ?  Is the B2 model good for most 30's rims ?

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6 hours ago, Brooklyn Beer said:

Just how universal is the pacific rim tool?  Larger and smaller models ?  Is the B2 model good for most 30's rims ?

Hercules, Atlas and about ten more companies each made Rim Jacks in several sizes.  I happen to have one that is truly universal. It will fit from 17" to 31" rims. Because of the extra adjustments it is heavy and some what awkward to use.

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having a 1929 Chevrolet i have similar rim concepts on mine. i have picked up 2 tools and rebuilt them.

one is a smaller size and  other is a larger style. 

 

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you can see the difference in size of the parts small & large for each tool

the larger tool is all in primer gray, smaller tool naked metal fresh out blaster.

 

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one tool rebuilt and ready for use :)

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I have a Pacific "Jr." model. It's lighter and more compact so it can fit in under-seat tool boxes, but it can only handle up to about 22-23 inch rims.

 

Paul

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What size rims are on a 1930 Franklin.   The cost on these tools are all over the board with most folks listing them as Model T or Model A tools.  Read through all the good instructions on the Pacific tool.  The picture of the lady using it is pretty funny.  I figure if a 110 pound women in a dress and heels can use it I should be able to figure it myself.

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3 hours ago, PFitz said:

I have a Pacific "Jr." model. It's lighter and more compact so it can fit in under-seat tool boxes, but it can only handle up to about 22-23 inch rims.

 Are you interested in selling your rim spreader? I'm interested in buying a smaller one if the price isn't to dear.

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19 hours ago, Brooklyn Beer said:

What size rims are on a 1930 Franklin.   The cost on these tools are all over the board with most folks listing them as Model T or Model A tools.  Read through all the good instructions on the Pacific tool.  The picture of the lady using it is pretty funny.  I figure if a 110 pound women in a dress and heels can use it I should be able to figure it myself.

 Your demountable rims are only 19inch.

 

Paul

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16 hours ago, 1937-44 said:

 Are you interested in selling your rim spreader? I'm interested in buying a smaller one if the price isn't to dear.

 

Just now, PFitz said:

 Your demountable rims are only 19inch.

 

Paul

Sorry, but it's not for sale. I don't work on larger diameter rims and this small one fits my needs best, including storage space.

 

Paul

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