Steve_Mack_CT

Young people in the hobby DO exist!!

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Posted (edited)

Victoria, I love your car and glad that you have chosen to join with us on the forum. 

 

There seem to be a fair number of AACA forum members in the PNW, but they seem pretty far flung and it's just been near impossible to garner any real interest.

 

Terry your right California is big, but all of the West is big. Think about this, there are no active AACA chapters in the states of Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana and Utah. When you add the Canadian Provinces of British Columbia and Alberta, you probably have an area as large as all of the US, east of the Mississippi River.

Edited by Buffalowed Bill (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

Buffalowed Bill,

 

If you can find 15 people who are, or are willing to become, AACA members, you can form a Region in your state. Then if there are at least 5 people in an relatively close geographical areas who are, or are willing to become AACA members, those 5 members can form a local Chapter. The local chapters can have regular meetings and put on local Chapter events. The Statewide Region, could have an event or two during the year, moving it around to be hosted by different chapters in their local areas. That is the basic formula used decades ago here in NC. We have huge numbers of AACA members in NC and have both Chapter, Region, and National AACA events in NC regularly. The AACA headquarters and the AACA Board of Directors can wish to have active AACA clubs in your area forever and it will never happen. It takes people in an area who want to have a club to make it happen. It is really that simple... and yes perhaps that hard. You can complain about a lack of AACA clubs in your area forever, or you can make it happen. 

 

From the Bylaws:

ARTICLE 7 - REGIONS AND CHAPTERS Section

7.1. Any group of fifteen or more members of AACA must make written application on an approved form to the Board for a Regional Charter. Section

7.2. Five or more members of AACA must apply on an approved form to the governing board of a Region for a Chapter under the administration of the Region. Section

7.3. All applications for Regions and Chapters must be submitted to the Vice President - Regions for review and submission to the Board for approval.

Edited by MCHinson (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, MCHinson said:

Buffalowed Bill,

 

If you can find 15 people who are, or are willing to become, AACA members, you can form a Region in your state. Then if there are at least 5 people in an relatively close geographical areas who are, or are willing to become AACA members, those 5 members can form a local Chapter. The local chapters can have regular meetings and put on local Chapter events. The Statewide Region, could have an event or two during the year, moving it around to be hosted by different chapters in their local areas. That is the basic formula used decades ago here in NC. We have huge numbers of AACA members in NC and have both Chapter, Region, and National AACA events in NC regularly. The AACA headquarters and the AACA Board of Directors can wish to have active AACA clubs in your area forever and it will never happen. It takes people in an area who want to have a club to make it happen. It is really that simple... and yes perhaps that hard. You can complain about a lack of AACA clubs in your area forever, or you can make it happen. 

 

From the Bylaws:

ARTICLE 7 - REGIONS AND CHAPTERS Section

7.1. Any group of fifteen or more members of AACA must make written application on an approved form to the Board for a Regional Charter. Section

7.2. Five or more members of AACA must apply on an approved form to the governing board of a Region for a Chapter under the administration of the Region. Section

7.3. All applications for Regions and Chapters must be submitted to the Vice President - Regions for review and submission to the Board for approval.

 

Did you read this?

Some of us have tried!

In 1969 a small group of local Prescott residents who were passionate about antique and classic cars decided to start their own car club.  After several meetings to hash out the details, the Prescott Antique Auto Club was chartered in 1970.  Today, approaching 50 years of continuous operation, the club is going strong with over 240 memberships, more than 400 members and over 600 cars in their garages. I would say that the club members cars are about 1/4 to 1/3rd the number of cars in our area.

And for those of you who would probably ask. YES!  I made them aware of AACA to see if they wanted to become a AACA chapter and the answer was a resounding NO.

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2 hours ago, Pfeil said:

 

Did you read this?

Some of us have tried!

In 1969 a small group of local Prescott residents who were passionate about antique and classic cars decided to start their own car club.  After several meetings to hash out the details, the Prescott Antique Auto Club was chartered in 1970.  Today, approaching 50 years of continuous operation, the club is going strong with over 240 memberships, more than 400 members and over 600 cars in their garages. I would say that the club members cars are about 1/4 to 1/3rd the number of cars in our area.

And for those of you who would probably ask. YES!  I made them aware of AACA to see if they wanted to become a AACA chapter and the answer was a resounding NO.

 

Yes, I read that post. My post was directed to someone who has complained repeatedly over many years that there are no antique car clubs in his area. The bottom line is if you want a club in your area, you need to work with others to start one. The independent club in your area is well established and apparently does not want to change that status. If it is working for them, I understand. I am a member of multiple clubs. If you also want to see an AACA affiliated club in your area, I would suggest you should research unaffiliated AACA members in your area and consider starting an AACA Region in your area. There is room for people to be members of multiple clubs, and there are often opportunities for multiple clubs in a local area, each complementing and often working with the others. 

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Any AACA member can easily go to the club's website, sign in, and search for other AACA members in their area or any other area. A quick check shows that there are 17 current AACA members in the city of Portland, OR (10 Joint Member couples, and 7 individual members). That is more than enough members to form an AACA Region headquartered in Portland if someone in that area wants to get a Region Started.   

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, MCHinson said:

Any AACA member can easily go to the club's website, sign in, and search for other AACA members in their area or any other area. A quick check shows that there are 17 current AACA members in the city of Portland, OR (10 Joint Member couples, and 7 individual members). That is more than enough members to form an AACA Region headquartered in Portland if someone in that area wants to get a Region Started.   

That doesn’t even include me because I’ve been having trouble getting into the site to renew and it’s kind of been on the back burner. I emailed them recently to fix it. I miss the magazine. 

Edited by victorialynn2 (see edit history)

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Exactly my point there are enough members to start numerous chapters, but nothing comes of my cajoling. If you think hearing about it is tiring, you aught to try it from this side. I've gotten old trying to affect a change, which never comes.

 

I do apologize for some of my responses, that to some must seem to be rants. But this is the only way that I have the reach the anonymous regional membership, at the same time make the rest of the membership realize that, with all the talk about bring youth into the AACA, there is a huge section of the hobby without some of the same benefits that many of you have.  God only knows how many new members the hobby could gain, were there events available to them. 

 

As for the few young gearheads, who here thinks that without a club willing to accept them the way they are, that they will ever become part of the mainstream hobby? There is no magic about change, but change for the sake of what-old iron for which they have no affinity, history, that most seem to have little interest in, or their grandfather's company? This is a different generation then any that we have seen in our lifetime. For seventy years one of the common denominators that the generation could count on to bring them together, was the automobile, but no more.

 

Bill

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Victoria, the AACA membership is based on the 

calendar year.  So if you renew now, you'll be good

for the remaining 4 or 5 months of 2019.  Also, the

office tries to send magazine issues from earlier in the year

if they still have them, so you should get the year's

worth of magazines.

 

If the website is still giving problems, you could call

the main office in Hershey, Pa. and they could probably

take the renewal information by phone.  (With a credit

card?)  Or they could mail you a renewal form.

 

It's definitely worth being a member!

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51 minutes ago, Buffalowed Bill said:

Exactly my point there are enough members to start numerous chapters, but nothing comes of my cajoling. If you think hearing about it is tiring, you aught to try it from this side. I've gotten old trying to affect a change, which never comes.

 

I do apologize for some of my responses, that to some must seem to be rants. But this is the only way that I have the reach the anonymous regional membership, at the same time make the rest of the membership realize that, with all the talk about bring youth into the AACA, there is a huge section of the hobby without some of the same benefits that many of you have.  God only knows how many new members the hobby could gain, were there events available to them. 

 

As for the few young gearheads, who here thinks that without a club willing to accept them the way they are, that they will ever become part of the mainstream hobby? There is no magic about change, but change for the sake of what-old iron for which they have no affinity, history, that most seem to have little interest in, or their grandfather's company? This is a different generation then any that we have seen in our lifetime. For seventy years one of the common denominators that the generation could count on to bring them together, was the automobile, but no more.

 

Bill

Bill,

 

My best advice is as follows. Look up the members who are local to you in the online listing on the website. Prepare an invitation flyer to an AACA Local Region organizational meeting. Mail the flyer to those who are in your area. You may want to drive an antique car over to as many of them as possible instead of mailing them. With a personal invitation from a guy driving an antique car, you will probably get a better response. Whoever shows up to your organizational meeting will probably know other gearheads who are not current AACA members. You can obtain the necessary forms from headquarters to start a Region. When you get those, also be sure to get a stack of AACA Membership forms and brochures. The brochures have a place on them for a local region or chapter contact. A computer generated label to put on those forms with a phone number and email address for contact is a good idea. 

 

I would also suggest you check on facebook (or get someone else to check for you if you are not on facebook) for your local Cars and Coffee. Drive an antique car to your Cars and Coffee every time it meets. Talk to people there. Have prospective members packets ready to hand out. The packets I use have our local Chapter membership form, an NC Region membership form, a National AACA membership form, a cover letter, a region trifold information flyer, a national brochure, and a local chapter informational sheet.  I have signed up more new AACA members at our local cars and coffee event this year than at any other venue. As long as you (or a family member or friend) can create some basic forms and print them up to create a prospective member packets to hand out to folks, you will find it is not that hard to sign up members. Another good idea is to have some extra old issues of Antique Automobile to hand out to folks who are not AACA members. The quality of the magazine alone, helps sign up prospective new members. 

DSC_0977.JPG

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1 hour ago, Buffalowed Bill said:

 

 

As for the few young gearheads, who here thinks that without a club willing to accept them the way they are, that they will ever become part of the mainstream hobby? There is no magic about change, but change for the sake of what-old iron for which they have no affinity, history, that most seem to have little interest in, or their grandfather's company? This is a different generation then any that we have seen in our lifetime. For seventy years one of the common denominators that the generation could count on to bring them together, was the automobile, but no more.

 

Bill

 

Bill, the only young kids that I know in my area that are into cars are the "TUNER CARS" These kids are the new hot hotrodders of today. Like the hot rods of yester year that are still being made they all have a common thread. All of them are modified cars, and modified cars don't go well with the terms Restoration, Preservation which are hallmarks of clubs like AACA.

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3 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

Victoria, the AACA membership is based on the 

calendar year.  So if you renew now, you'll be good

for the remaining 4 or 5 months of 2019.  Also, the

office tries to send magazine issues from earlier in the year

if they still have them, so you should get the year's

worth of magazines.

 

If the website is still giving problems, you could call

the main office in Hershey, Pa. and they could probably

take the renewal information by phone.  (With a credit

card?)  Or they could mail you a renewal form.

 

It's definitely worth being a member!

Thanks and I know it’s worth it. The lapse has more to do with being overwhelmed with responsibilities and putting my wants on the back burner. I will call tomorrow if the don’t answer my email. Thank you!

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Personally I think AACA should focus on being the body for unmodified vehicles over 25 years as it has for some time.  Most folks know you cannot beat marque specific clubs for measuring the very best cars, but general meets that encompass all makes has a place no one else can fill.  Why dilute that? 

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In my experience, driving my 1937 Buick is all it takes to attract people into the hobby and AACA. I drive it to lunch, dinner, Cars and Coffee, and other opportunities on a regular basis. People of all ages seem to want to talk about the car. I typically have prospective member kits in my car and hand them out to those who express interest in joining the club when I talk with them about old cars, the hobby, and AACA. They don't all join, but more of them do than you might suspect. I offer rides to those who like old cars but don't have one. They are often suprised how affordable an antique car can be. They often think that they can't afford one, but are surprised to learn that you can get a good driving decent looking AACA elighbile car for a lot less than they have been lead to believe by watching car auction shows on TV. You never know when those seeds planted will grow. Even if it does not gain a new member, you can have fun sharing the hobby in this manner.

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2 hours ago, 48Firetruck said:

What's the real advantage of becoming affiliated [with AACA]?  And don't say the great magazine and camaraderie,  there's more quality reading material on the internet than the magazine could print in 20 lifetimes and everyone already has friends with common interest.

 

Mr. 48, I'll point out my thoughts.  The great magazine

and the camaraderie ARE very appealing.  If I may explain:

 

---I've known car fans before belonging to the AACA, but

joining, and actively participating by producing a regional

newsletter, has greatly broadened my group of friends.

I know people from all walks of life, including some with

interesting stories--and even across the country, too.

 

---The magazine is a tangible way to learn more about cars.

Reading on a computer screen isn't all that comfortable--

especially for those who work on a computer during the day--

and the quality of the magazine's writing is excellent, sometimes

better than the variable quality of unknown internet authors.

 

Also:

---A region or chapter that is part of the AACA receives

excellent insurance benefits when putting on a show or tour.

This alone may be worth the affiliation!

 

---The AACA, being the nation's largest car club, is an

advocate for the hobby as a whole.  Members have helped

protect against restrictive legislation and helped win some

of the benefits that car owners enjoy.

 

---Members of the national AACA have access to old-car

events (national meets and tours) all across the country.

Actively participating will broaden one's interests and 

circle of friends FAR beyond what a local club can possibly do.

 

So expand those horizons!  Grow, and always do more and better things!

 

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