Steve_Mack_CT

Young people in the hobby DO exist!!

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This made my day.  I was coming back from the dealership a little while ago (for a noise they cannot seem to diagnose but that is an entirely different matter..) and I pull into our neighborhood.  A few houses down from me I see a kid in his early 20s with a 29 Chrysler roadster in about the shape my A is in, holding the carb in his hand walking around.  I stopped and we introduced each other, he inherited the car from his grandfather and it interested in keeping it running in stock form - maybe restoring someday.

 

Needless to say I am stockpiling some excess books, etc. for him.

 

Can we get this guy into the AACA Steve M, West or anyone else?

 

Yet ANOTHER car friend who is under 30 let alone 40 or 50.

 

turned my mood around instantly!!!  🙂

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As long as we try to convince our young people to like the cars that we like, we will fail. If we really want to include the young in our circles, we would have to understand and accept the cars that they like. We know that the first is premise has failed, but it remains to be seen if we old timers will be willing to adjust. I doubt that many of us will go the extra mile. Once we are gone, what is left of the hobby will look vastly different then it does today.

Edited by Buffalowed Bill (see edit history)
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36 minutes ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Can we get this guy into the AACA Steve M, West or anyone else?🙂

 

Certainly.  Every year, each AACA region president 

receives 4 free national memberships to give out to

newcomers who have never belonged to the AACA.

They're intended as "free trials" so people may renew

on their own the next year.  Some regions reportedly

don't use them all!  So ask your AACA region president.

 

Maybe give him an occasional ride in your own Model A,

and show periodic interest in his own car's progress.

And remember he's not just a kid!

 

I certainly don't mind associating with car fans who may

be years or decades older than I.  I learn from them and

like to hear the stories of things I never lived through.

One friend is an active 99 and still has a car he got new in 1935!

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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Steve Mack call me.  Bill sorry to disagree with you, to simply abdicate that no young person will not like what we like will absolutely doom the hobby.  We need to respect what they like but also introduce them to our world. Tastes change and many people have gravitated to different cars over time.  As a former hot rod guy I never thought I would fall in love with brass cars but I did.  We see lots of young people who are even touring in our ancient machines.

 

Whether it is a shows, on our VERY active group Facebook page we are seeing more and more young people.  Not in the droves we would like but young people and women are taking a more active role.  That being said, I totally agree that we need to understand how to deal with the latest generations and what they like.  People are working on it hard and from a lot of different angles. 

 

Our cars and the history they bring forth must be saved and AACA and others plan on having a positive effect on the car hobby for a long time to come. 

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1 hour ago, Buffalowed Bill said:

As long as we try to convince our young people to like the cars that we like, we will fail. If we really want to include the young in our circles, we would have to understand and accept the cars that they like. We know that the first is premise has failed, but it remains to be seen if we old timers will be willing to adjust. I doubt that many of us will go the extra mile. Once we are gone, what is left of the hobby will look vastly different then it does today.

Why try to convince anyone let alone young people to like anything. It sounds like someone is trying to sell something.  Setting a example of restored cars and encouragement of the curious that look into the car hobby is the way to go. AACA makes it clear about how old a car has to be to compete. I've never heard someone in any sort of capacity discourage owners cars which have just turned 25 years old.

 

 The real threat is people and leaders that will forever threaten our hobby by way of persuading popular opinion of old cars in a negative way. Teaching the young that automobiles, planes, trains, ships are causing  grave harm and should be done away with. This is where the problem of us being able to continue the way we want to in our love for the automobile and in reality our way of life is most paramount. Go to car shows and listen to the young people talk about our cars. Listen to your grandchildren, ask them what they learn in schools about our cars, the energy sector of our economy, industry in general. See how minds are molded. Hear the difference between a society which used to say  "can do" as opposed to the "can't do" society.  

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Thanks Steve M - and others will call you tomorrow Steve.  I would spring for it myself but have a few other things up my sleeve for this kid.  Yes, if he was working on an '88 Civic he would still be a young hobbyist, but I think if he shows up to a show like our Klingberg series in this 50 year old paint, rock solid Chrysler roadster with artillery wheels someone loved, golf bag door and stone stock, the crowd will love it!  🙂

 

He is working on basic servicing now, and I am trying to find local support more knowledgeable on these early MOPARs than me, have a couple of leads.

 

He already seems to appreciate the car for what it is and that it belonged to grandpa - he has some concerns about his abilities to get it properly serviced and road ready...  I did not say the "R" word as there seemed to be no need and he has already heard "don't rod it" by now I am sure.  

 

Now I just need to influence him away from that awful music, but we will get there! 😉

 

Fun stuff!!

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Steve_Mack_CT, that's great.   It's always super-important to show the next generation how fun old cars are and to make the hobby accessible to them.  A few contacts with friendly helpers in the hobby can go a long way towards that.   Then it's up to them to decide if that's what they want, as it always is.

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Don't spook 'em by going too heavy too fast! Unicorns are notoriously skittish!

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my youngest daughter really likes the 56 Chevys. She's 19 and is currently in college. She wants to own one someday. My older daughter like my 28 Boyer fire truck. She is 22. She plans to take it for a ride when she gets married from the church to the reception hall. That is if I have it done by then. 

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Great advice guys.  Mike Stearns - ahh, 56 Chevys.  Tell her the DUMBEST move I ever made was to swap mine (one car I can say I restored end to end, a nice, stock 210 two door sedan) for a real POS Corvette.  Corvette fever can be dangerous, especially when one is in their early 20s....  Even my grandma rest her soul was not pleased with me for that blunder...

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Bill I agree philosophically but he is already there - the cool thing!!  I seem to meet at least a couple of under 40s every year who like prewar cars.  I assume a lot like other cars as well, but it is not where I spend my time so I could not say as much there...

 

 

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While the focus seems to be on recruiting the "young" to the hobby an argument could be made that is the wrong place to mine for newbies. The vast majority of younger folks, no matter how interested in old cars, will succumb  to the realities of raising a family, providing for their children financially and coping with life in general. If they ever do rekindle their interest it will be in later life when they have fewer commitments, more time, and more disposable income.

It seems to me more would be gained by courting the empty nest cohort that are  looking for a new interest to perk up their lives rather than chasing the pie in the sky dream of a whole new generation of eager young recruits. ..........Bob

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Over the past 50+ years the thing that has alienated me from segments on the hobby is the manner in which another person's values were imposed on me. I am sure they had no idea they came on that way. They did. It was the tone of voice, body language, and faultless attitude. Even "the R word". That stands for "restore", right. They always told me not to mess around with those big, rusty project cars. That kind of stuff was for the hot rodders.

 

And for heaven's sake, if someone new comes to a chapter meeting make it car related. So many antique car club meetings feel like a social buffet in purgatory.

 

Bernie

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1 hour ago, Pfeil said:

Why try to convince anyone let alone young people to like anything. It sounds like someone is trying to sell something.  Setting a example of restored cars and encouragement of the curious that look into the car hobby is the way to go. AACA makes it clear about how old a car has to be to compete. I've never heard someone in any sort of capacity discourage owners cars which have just turned 25 years old.

 

 The real threat is people and leaders that will forever threaten our hobby by way of persuading popular opinion of old cars in a negative way. Teaching the young that automobiles, planes, trains, ships are causing  grave harm and should be done away with. This is where the problem of us being able to continue the way we want to in our love for the automobile and in reality our way of life is most paramount. Go to car shows and listen to the young people talk about our cars. Listen to your grandchildren, ask them what they learn in schools about our cars, the energy sector of our economy, industry in general. See how minds are molded. Hear the difference between a society which used to say  "can do" as opposed to the "can't do" society.  

 

One of the problems is that there is a certain amount of truth regarding the downside of automobiles and humans. Probably not to the degree that the green movement zealots would have people believe,  and not even all emissions related { congestion, urban sprawl etc.}.

 There is a place in the world for better utilization and expansion of things like public transit. And I myself am one of the first ones to inwardly laugh at the twisted consumer logic that makes a quite large SUV or similar vehicle the popular choice of many people these days.

Vintage cars, as often portrayed  these days as dinosaur gas guzzlers make a very easy target for the zealots. I don't think there is much we can do about this. So many things in our lives are becoming politicised and propagandized about that arriving at a clear headed understanding about almost anything is actually quite difficult in recent years. Very few issues are truly black and white, and various forces are becoming very skilful in the art of convincing using the tools of half truths, and exploiting the power of doubt and misinformation. 

 The old car hobby is just a very small part of a much larger modern trend.  

Be true to your belief's and lead by example.

 

Greg in Canada

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1 hour ago, Bhigdog said:

While the focus seems to be on recruiting the "young" to the hobby an argument could be made that is the wrong place to mine for newbies. The vast majority of younger folks, no matter how interested in old cars, will succumb  to the realities of raising a family, providing for their children financially and coping with life in general. If they ever do rekindle their interest it will be in later life when they have fewer commitments, more time, and more disposable income.

It seems to me more would be gained by courting the empty nest cohort that are  looking for a new interest to perk up their lives rather than chasing the pie in the sky dream of a whole new generation of eager young recruits. ..........Bob

 

I agree that empty nesters are a great group of future antique car buyers.  On the other hand, I had three antique cars before I met my wife, and I made clear early on in our dating that the cars would be part of any deal.  :)

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I’m 30. Have had my current automobile, a 1926 Dodge Brothers since 2017. And got my first classic, a 1959 Edsel in 2008 when I was 19. Cut my teeth on that car. Learned a lot. Sold it last year. Who knows what’s next. 

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Of course there are no absolutes. My point is that if the choice becomes choosing between family obligations and a hobby the family almost always,and should, win. Soon after i was married i bought an old 1937 buick with the idea of fixing it up. Then my kids were born. Then i changed careers.  Then i built a house. After 20 years i sold the buick that had long since turned into a barn find.

In due course when time, finances and desire  came together I bought, restored, and showed a succession of 5 cars.

I'm guessing my experience is FAR more common than the youngster who is courted at a young age and then devotes his adult life to old cars.

Just sayin the repeated mantra of "we need to involve the youth" while a nice thought ain't where the meat and potatos is......bob

Edited by Bhigdog (see edit history)

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It also makes me feel good to run across young people interested in old cars. A high school student pulled over in his truck to talk to me about the old Ford I was vacuuming out. His friends were with him in the truck, and I got the impression they were teasing him about his old car interest, but he still made the effort to talk to me. Like a lot of really young drivers, he wasn't made of money. He said his one and only old car was a '90's Ford Aerostar van. You have to show enthusiasm for whatever vehicle they have, and that's what I did, though I know little about Aerostars. Someday he may work back to cars of the 80's or 70's, which would be really ancient for him.

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As of October, all my cars other than the two DDs will qualify for antique/classic insurance.

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4 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

Over the past 50+ years the thing that has alienated me from segments on the hobby is the manner in which another person's values were imposed on me. I am sure they had no idea they came on that way. They did. It was the tone of voice, body language, and faultless attitude. Even "the R word". That stands for "restore", right. They always told me not to mess around with those big, rusty project cars. That kind of stuff was for the hot rodders.

 

And for heaven's sake, if someone new comes to a chapter meeting make it car related. So many antique car club meetings feel like a social buffet in purgatory.

 

Bernie

One of the reasons I left(there were more) the local chapter of the POC in 2014 was it seemed like I was driving 3 hours each way for lunch.  Nice group of people for sure but not too much working on cars.  Got to the point where the business meetings were twice a year.  I felt that what I was interested in was not addressed(i.e. working on the cars).   i have not rejoined any Club since.

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7 hours ago, plymouthcranbrook said:

One of the reasons I left(there were more) the local chapter of the POC in 2014 was it seemed like I was driving 3 hours each way for lunch.  Nice group of people for sure but not too much working on cars.  Got to the point where the business meetings were twice a year.  I felt that what I was interested in was not addressed(i.e. working on the cars).   i have not rejoined any Club since.

 

Interesting read.

I’m a member of a local historic vehicle club and have similar experiences. Many in the group seem to focus heavily on the social aspect of eating out and similar events and very very little on cars. I even suggested a serious of “how to workshops” but nothing ever eventuated.

 

  Currently I am considering joining another group of Hot Rod owners as they seem to be more in tune with what I am searching for, even though my ‘38 Buick will never be a hot rod.

 

Because of our concessional registration requirements to belong to a car club, I might as well be in one that I like!

 

12 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

 

 

And for heaven's sake, if someone new comes to a chapter meeting make it car related. So many antique car club meetings feel like a social buffet in purgatory.

 

Bernie

 

Yup, exactly that!

 

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀

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7 minutes ago, rodneybeauchamp said:

I’m a member of a local historic vehicle club and have similar experiences. Many in the group seem to focus heavily on the social aspect of eating out and similar events and very very little on cars. I even suggested a serious of “how to workshops” but nothing ever eventuated.

Rodney

Our local chapter of the Studebaker DRIVERS Club tries to have driving tours in the summer months in lieu of formal monthly meetings, so we don't become just the 'Studebaker Diners Club'.

 

Craig

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11 hours ago, 1935Packard said:

 

I agree that empty nesters are a great group of future antique car buyers.  On the other hand, I had three antique cars before I met my wife, and I made clear early on in our dating that the cars would be part of any deal.  :)

 

 

Time to re-negotiate the deal........to six cars or more. Don't tell her I said this!

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All good points on club membership.  Another mistake I think is loading up the new guy or younger person with club tasks.  I left the local AACA region because 3, 4 retired guys felt the need to delegate everything to a couple of us "young guns" - who BTW, have full time plus jobs.  I found it more of a hassle than fun.  But club membership, focus of a given club, etc. is secondary I think, to cultivating the interest.  As 35Packard notes, ultimately the individual decides what trips his or her trigger.  Personally I like cars a lot of folks ignore - I will pass a flock of muscle cars to find the prewar stuff.  If I go to a local show with my brother in law, we walk different sides of the show  and catch up later.  All good, though.  Will be stopping by Mat's later with a care package and hope it is helpful!  

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