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Driving My 26 Buick Master six


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Greetings, After some great suggestions from the group my 26 Master six is running. I am presently doing a fluid check & fill on the transmission & rear end. After that I want to pull the wheels & apply grease...any suggestions would be appreciated... next step drive ...what is the shift pattern? 

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Thanks Hugh I appreciate the info. I will check out the Super Lube synthetic. I do have the shop manual...sorta misplaced my owner manual. It's here somewhere. BTW I picked up this air cleaner 4" intake.

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  • 7 months later...

Pooch - what are the details behind that filter?   Looks good.   Did you need to adjust the carb or re-jet?   I'd like to do the same.

Hugh - The Superlube you mention seems to be for food machinery.  I'm trying to figure out the 'steam cylinder oil' mentioned in the manuals.  I searched and came across Mobil 600w - which seemed like the closest thing.   This oil is very high viscosity (close to 400) when cold, which explains why it is hard to shift the transmission cold for sure.  Not made for something changing temperatures.  Are some guys using plain old 75w90?          

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Bruce, 

    I was finding the space a little tight to fit the pleated type filter in as I still have the exhaust gas tubing in place, so I found this one on Ebay.  I have not installed it yet.  I was going to take a 1 1/2" wide piece of sheetmetal and wrap it into a circle and hold the circle with a pop rivet.  Then drill a hole in it so that it will not fall out of the carburetor  as it is the connector for the filter.    A photo is below.

 

Regarding grease, I like the synthetics because it does not separate like a see a lot of old conventional greases.  What I recommend now is Redline CV-2.  It has some pretty impressive specifications.

 

I don't have any 600W in the car.  Too old school for me.  Some guys like it.  I prefer Snyders M-533.  It is a modern equivalent.  That is what is in my rear axle and steering box.  A favorite seems to be John Deere Corn head grease for the steering box as it won't leak out as readily from a worn steering box.  I put a lip seal in my steering box so it does not leak.  For the transmission, some like the 600W or equivalent.  I find my car does not shift well on it.  I use a mix of 60% Lucas 80/90 gear oil and 40% Lucas HD stabilizer.  The model A guys recommended this to me and you can buy it at Walmart.   I buy the synthetic version.    Hugh

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Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)
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Well Hugh, I got the “Why didn’t I think of that?” feeling again re. the sock filter - we’ve been using similar filters on a lot of equipment.

Was wondering what to do with this w/out modifying anything. The opening gash pictured on the lower right served as the ‘air intake’ on my ‘18. Never any provision for a filter of any sort. Past couple of years I’ve paid close attention to the setups on similar era cars at shows which actually had their hoods open (far and few between - why?) and have only seen one with a rudimentary wire filter canister. The owner said it was period aftermarket and, “Not very effective — but was told it was good enough to keep horse shit out.” But that attachment wouldn’t’ve fit on mine as that pipe attaches directly to the hot air muff clamped to the exhaust pipe as well.

We did plug off the flexible metal tube that was piping hot exhaust right into the carb. The soot was incredible — it’s a mystery to me why (or how) the last owner kept that functioning for the 50 years he drove the car.

The noise that came blatting out of that thing was even more incredible. Down there trying to adjust the carb. and walked away with ears ringing. Couldn’t get the thing adjusted well on my own so I took the car to a friend’s shop. I asked if we should block that tube off and he said, “No, you need that - otherwise the carb. will ice up.” I shrugged and thought, “I read somewhere they piped that heat in there to get the low octane gas of the day to burn easier.”

Whatever, I came back and he had plugged it off. He said, “Boy that was loud, I’ve been deaf in one ear for 2 days.” Ran 50% quieter after that... “Blatt blatt blatt” sounded like an angry little pig....

 

0774AABD-122F-480B-A523-82C9C5922B4F.jpeg

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Ben,

The Marvel Carburetor looks to be in very nice condition.  Let's all hope that it is adjusted as well as it looks and runs that nice when everything is all back together.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Ben, 

     For 1925 Buick used an aluminum casting on the air intake.  No Filter.  Later in the year, and starting in 1926, the air filter was part of the 3 filter trifecta for engine protection (gas, air and oil).   My intention was to use the green filter tube during normal driving, and install the casting if there was points judging involved.  It is held on with 1 slotted round head screw.  Easy to swap out.  I could install the 1926 style filter.  Make a donut shaped screen with a cut in it for removal and be in the same place.  Uni also sells this foam in sheets and you can make your own design.       Hugh

7688448_IMG_7589Throttleandexhaustwideopen.thumb.JPG.680a32002ba9bbb285261e56ec877867.JPG978854028_26-27-28airfilter.thumb.jpg.ed64272bf74fbc3292eb775f60fee589.jpg675366350_airfiltermaterial.thumb.JPG.bdb231c6da17866ee1cb4e709bf9935e.JPG

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Well, my fingers are crossed Terry, but have this bad feeling that it’ll all be done and this Marvel is still waiting for me....

Was surprised to find out it’s all ‘correct’. All the stamped codes match exactly what’s in the parts-book. Car came with 3 boxes of carb. parts - 1/2dz. different bowls, all different codes. No clue what it’s all to and may never identify it all.

Always read that ‘an ignition problem can act like a carb. problem’ but never imagined that gas coming out of the exhaust pipe could be an ignition problem — but that seemed to end it.

We shall see🙂

 

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Ben, 

    The big book of parts does a good job with listing all the part numbers for the Marvel carburetors each year.  I have used it to find new homes for my extra carburetor parts.   If you dont have the book you could photograph the parts and post them.     Hugh

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(Sorry to keep polluting this thread)

Hugh,

That Master Parts List is the one book I haven’t gotten yet. I do have a 1914-1921 Delco Master parts catalog.

Q. Does that M-P book illustrate each part like the parts-books do? The one issue I’ve been having is: The parts-book lists the part number, but it’s only the illustration that shows the codes as stamped on the part itself — which never has anything to do with the factory part-number.

Thanks,

Ben

P.S. 100+ years later this process hasn’t improved one bit. In school I had a job removing supplier’s part # labels from components and replacing it with a label for GM’s part # — that was the entire job. Told it’s still done that way today.

Incredible waste.

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Ben, 

  There are not a lot of pictures in this Master parts book, except in the carburetor section.  That section has a carburetor cut away and then a parts listing for the 20's to 1932 Buick.   Marvel Carburetors seemed to use casting numbers and part numbers as the same which helps immensly. 

 

Since we are on this site to connect parts with people that need them, why don't you start a thread in the buy and sell section.  Take a photo of the parts and list any associated numbers.   We may be able to tell what some of it goes to.      Hugh

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IMG_1066.thumb.jpg.661cddd7faf4261f26233daee19c37d9.jpg

Here is a picture of the air filter I mentioned above installed.   It fit perfectly - was inexpensive - leaves plenty of room if I want to install the heat tube later - and is the general shape/size/color of the original.

   

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  • 2 weeks later...

I thought long and hard about putting an air filter on my E-49, but decided that all the roads around here are paved and I don't put many miles on it.....and I'm too lazy.

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On 4/3/2020 at 3:40 PM, Hubert_25-25 said:

Ben, 

     For 1925 Buick used an aluminum casting on the air intake.  No Filter.  Later in the year, and starting in 1926, the air filter was part of the 3 filter trifecta for engine protection (gas, air and oil).   My intention was to use the green filter tube during normal driving, and install the casting if there was points judging involved.  It is held on with 1 slotted round head screw.  Easy to swap out.  I could install the 1926 style filter.  Make a donut shaped screen with a cut in it for removal and be in the same place.  Uni also sells this foam in sheets and you can make your own design.       Hugh

7688448_IMG_7589Throttleandexhaustwideopen.thumb.JPG.680a32002ba9bbb285261e56ec877867.JPG978854028_26-27-28airfilter.thumb.jpg.ed64272bf74fbc3292eb775f60fee589.jpg675366350_airfiltermaterial.thumb.JPG.bdb231c6da17866ee1cb4e709bf9935e.JPG


 

I am still looking for a air cleaner can like that Hugh, if you or anyone comes across one please let me know!  I’d greatly appreciate it!  

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William, 

     These tin can air filters are another part that come up missing on a lot of our Buicks.    This one I have is applicable to 1926/27/28 Buick Standards.  It was in the box of spares with my car.  They increased the size of the filter connection from 1 3/4" to 1 7/8" which was the inlet size from the 1925 Masters.  The photo of the filter above is one that I saw on Ebay, and it uses pot metal vanes.  Maybe the pot metal design came later?  I had pushed this job aside because the filter was stuck in this rusty carburetor body, but I was able to pull it apart this morning so that I could take the measurements.   Attached are more photos and the dimensions in case someone wanted to build their own for that period look.        Hugh

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