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This one for Auburnseeker


Steve_Mack_CT
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He doesn't like the 35/36 as much as the earlier cars.   Personally,  I can't think of a better prewar car to tour or show with than a 35/36 Auburn.  Plenty of power and speed,  great styling,  and easy to work on.

 

This is the first time since 1954 that we haven't had at least one in the family.

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1 minute ago, alsancle said:

He doesn't like the 35/36 as much as the earlier cars.   Personally,  I can't think of a better prewar car to tour or show with than a 35/36 Auburn.  Plenty of power and speed,  great styling,  and easy to work on.

 

This is the first time since 1954 that we haven't had at least one in the family.

 

 

I can can help you out with one if you like. Well sorted!

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Belltown was one of the BEST IN THE STATE, sorry I've missed it again. Back in the 1970's it was filled with Brass era cars. Did the field get changed, of have I mixed it up with  East Hampton. Lime Rock Vintage Festival on Labor Day weekend, "Southbury'"now in Bethlehem Fair Grounds, Machinery show in Kent, Hershey, Lake Compounce CSRA Swap meet then it snows.

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They did make a coupe.  It was released late in the 35' model year.  About the rarest Auburns around.  Estimated to be six left out of a hundred and some made.  

 

It was a cabriolet body with fixed wood/chicken wire top.  I know of a few coupes that were turned into cabriolets since open cars were worth more at one time.  

 

Comfortable car to drive,  back window rolls down and with cowl vent it moves air nicely.  Ours has been driving down to Auburn fall for 40 years now.  

 

Bad thing with an Auburn is block problems.  They are really thin under the valves and all seem to be cracked.  They also have 7/16" fine head bolts into cast iron so they have all been helicoiled or they strip out.  

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Curti, I believe long term owner is in cromwell area.  I know the car has been restored a long time, he was a regular at our now defunct Glastonbury aaca show.  Nice guy, i have no idea how he keeps that car so perfect!

 

AJ, can get a side shot.  Deal is they bought back older models, refurbished and resold.  Besides mechanical updates the rooflines were dropped.  Technically, this brass era body was sold as a new 31!

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10 hours ago, Janousek said:

They did make a coupe.  It was released late in the 35' model year.  About the rarest Auburns around.  Estimated to be six left out of a hundred and some made.  

 

It was a cabriolet body with fixed wood/chicken wire top.  I know of a few coupes that were turned into cabriolets since open cars were worth more at one time.  

 

Comfortable car to drive,  back window rolls down and with cowl vent it moves air nicely.  Ours has been driving down to Auburn fall for 40 years now.  

 

Bad thing with an Auburn is block problems.  They are really thin under the valves and all seem to be cracked.  They also have 7/16" fine head bolts into cast iron so they have all been helicoiled or they strip out.  

If you are looking for an unrestored  Coupe, Shawn Miller via significantcars just sold one to Mark Spandakow  and he may be willing to part with it (he was more looking for a next project than a Coupe). 

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4 hours ago, Janousek said:

If it wasn't the wife's car then I'd fill the space with something I like. 

 

 Brad you better be careful even entertaining thoughts like that. I don't think that car is going to be on the market for a long, long time if ever.

 

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1 hour ago, alsancle said:

Well that year in an open car would work.  I don't really want a coupe if I'm stepping up to an Auburn.  I could have bought many regular sedans as well,  but haven't becasue i still want open,  though a convertible sedan would be the top choice as a speedster is just out of reach.  I do like the cream one with the aluminum re body recently listed in Hemmings but I'm about 60G short. 

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I kind of like the sportiness and formality that a convertible sedan brings vs. 3 window coupe.

 

AJ the Shappy Model J comes to mind.  I always thought Auburn did a particularly good job on that look.  Being a Ford guy I am sure Ford used that in styling the 35, 36 convt. Sedans

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Hmm.  You make a good point.  Of course, if you can fit in the Klingberg show you would see your scenario played out.  Here is the Shappy car and the Clyne's Judkins coupe which admittedly is eye candy.  Ed was trying to get "Melvin" there that day but had some unexpected things to deal with at his business.  Note the Auburn in the pic as well, Randy has voiced his feelongs on this cars colo scheme before, but it is pretty attractive in person.

20160618_105830.jpg

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Ok, While were are talking great looking  Duesenberg J's my favorite was the blue close coupled sport sedan the McGowan brothers had @20 years ago. I took photos of it but can't find them. I'm sure it is restored now, just would like to see a current photo of it. Bob 

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Bob, I have asked here before but given your CT knowledge do you recall a green Berline Model J in CT say 1990s and back?  The car showed up at Southbury on occasion and I have seen it on the road on the CT shoreline before, but not in years.

 

I think, but am not sure John Pascucci still owns a Model J Lebaron Barrel side - very cool car.  Have not seen much of him lately but he used to drive his stuff quite a bit not that long ago.

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