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this may have come from my Dad's dealership--------he three dealerships-------- Mopar, studebaker. simca      and sold used caddies-----  J3615  KENT-MORE   USA      Thought something to install seal           can any one help

TOOL 1.JPG

TOOL 2.JPG

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Definitely a seal driver/installer

 

From the second picture, you can see that this tool is made to go over a shaft, such as the transmission tail shaft. 

 

The new seal would be placed on the driver, then slide the tool and seal over the transmission tail shaft, and finally with one good solid hit on the driver with a hammer, the seal would be installed to the proper depth in the  transmission.  Easy

 

intimeold  

Edited by intimeold (see edit history)
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I've seen several sizes of these tools. One is for rear axle seals on late model Corvairs. Others are for most any other seal on a GM car.

 

6 hours ago, broker-len said:

J3615 

 

What did Google say?

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I made up a similar unit to install the felt seals in my 32’ Olds rear axles. I used PVC and softened it with heat to flare it out. If I can find the pictures, I’ll post them.

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  • 1 month later...
On 8/3/2019 at 11:52 PM, Frank DuVal said:

 

 

I've seen several sizes of these tools. One is for rear axle seals on late model Corvairs. Others are for most any other seal on a GM car.

 

 

What did Google say?

The tool design, is for all modern transmissions, not brand specific.  What does matter is the size (diameter) of the seal.  With one hand hold the tool and with the other hand "work", the seal onto the tool.  The seal will stay on the tool; and compress the rubber sealing surface, just a little.  Remember, there is a spring in the seal lip; so the tool exerts a little pressure on the rubber and spring, to protect the seal from the splines on the tail-shaft during Assembly  

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Kent-Moore manufactures the "factory tools" that you see called out in the factory service manuals. Typically GM, but they also do tools for Harley Davidson, Saab, and even John Deere. High four-digit "J-numbers" are typically mid-1960s vintage initial release, but often these tools have applications over many years, if not decades. As noted above, this is a seal driver of some type. You'd need a vintage Kent-Moore catalog to find the exact application.

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1 hour ago, joe_padavano said:

Kent-Moore manufactures the "factory tools" that you see called out in the factory service manuals. Typically GM, but they also do tools for Harley Davidson, Saab, and even John Deere. High four-digit "J-numbers" are typically mid-1960s vintage initial release, but often these tools have applications over many years, if not decades. As noted above, this is a seal driver of some type. You'd need a vintage Kent-Moore catalog to find the exact application.

Exactly right, Joe. Well said. I have some of those old Kent Moore catalogs, but as you said, the tool is useful in MANY applications. 

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