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TerryB

Crankshaft Oil Seal Question

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I have a question I hope the experience of those on the forum can answer. I have four or five of these MoPar crankshaft oil seal kits, part number 1064 942, that fit 1942-52 Chrysler and DeSoto 6 cyl.  Maybe even others as the old dealership they came from had written a newer number over the original one.  The question is, would this seal still be ok to use?  It’s seems to be made of some kind of harder material than rubber and is coated in what appears to be graphite powder.  I would like to move them on to someone who might need them but I don’t want to sell something that is not any good.  The few I have are still in sealed boxes.  Let me know what you 🤔. Thanks!

 

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20 minutes ago, Mikefit said:

When in doubt throw it out

 Hey! That's my quote.

 

Ex-Navy? I learned that at the same time I learned "Bad deal, brass and steel".

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I never had to use this type of seal so I don’t know if this is how they normally look.  Seen them on eBay that sold looking just like this but I’m not looking to stick anyone with a bad part.  If it’s useable it will be for sale for a lot less than eBay prices.

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That harder rubber was likely softer rubber 70 or so years ago. I,ve seen lots of soft rubber seals and they work well. What do you think a hard rubber seal would work like........bob

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11 minutes ago, Bhigdog said:

That harder rubber was likely softer rubber 70 or so years ago. I,ve seen lots of soft rubber seals and they work well. What do you think a hard rubber seal would work like........bob

Like you would expect a hard seal to work, lousy!  Yes, I thought the same but being part PA Dutch and Scottish decent, it’s difficult to just toss something away.  When my late father in law, 110% PA Dutch was gone we had a lot of fun looking at what he saved.  It’s an inherited affliction so at least I have an excuse.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, TerryB said:

Like you would expect a hard seal to work, lousy!  Yes, I thought the same but being part PA Dutch and Scottish decent, it’s difficult to just toss something away.  When my late father in law, 110% PA Dutch was gone we had a lot of fun looking at what he saved.  It’s an inherited affliction so at least I have an excuse.

 

I never said toss it. It likely has lots of other uses. A few come readily to mind: Ring toss, shower curtain ring, ear ring, IUD, nose ring, hampster hula hoop, etc, etc, etc, ad infinitum. None of which, by the way,  will cause a failed engine rebuild due to a massive rear seal oil leak.

All that said I know where you are coming from. My dad had a farm and NEVER threw ANYTHING away. After he died I actually filled a 40 YD roll off with his "stuff". Everything from buckets of used bolts and nails, old lumber of every type, size and description, every old tire he ever wore out, Every tool he ever broke or rusted out, bushel baskets of damp welding rods with no ID etc etc. And I'm guessing a bunch of old seals for who knows what he just couldn't bear to toss.................. Cheers............Bob

Edited by Bhigdog (see edit history)
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With a city number (31) not a zip code, it would have been made before mid 1963.

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A friend of mine who’s into old motorcycles soaks rubber parts in oil of wintergreen to soften them.  I have never done it myself but if you google search “oil of wintergreen to soften rubber” there’s a recipe to dilute with water to make a soaking solution.  I think he gets the oil from a health food store or that section of a drug store.  Maybe those seals could be saved.  I’m part Ukrainian and my wife is Dutch/Scottish what a combination.  Trying to breathe new life into old junk is a bad habit but it can be rewarding.

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Then there is the Amishman who has a drawer labeled "pieces of string too short to save".

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