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Kfigel

Early 20's Studebaker

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Question:  The early 20's Studebakers came in a touring or speedster model, as well as the sedan.  The speedster was also an open touring car.   What was the difference between the touring model and the speedster model?

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Not sure about Studebaker specifically, however many manufacturers had a 5 passenger " sport touring " and a larger model 7 passenger " touring car" that usually featured fold out "jump seats".  Sometimes built in the same series / wheelbase, but often the 7 pas. would feature a slightly longer wheelbase. We all have a mental image of what a "speedster" should look like today. However in the early years terms like this were often applied to a sporty 5 passenger open top car. The body style definitions were often more loosely used in the old days than they are understood to mean today.

 

Greg in Canada

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I think you may be referring to their Roadster models rather than Speedster.  The Roadster was a 3 passenger car with a convertible top.  It gave up the back seat and added a covered luggage area (basically a trunk).  The touring cars also had a convertible top but included a back seat for 3 or 5 (added two folding jump seats) depending on the size of the car.

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52 minutes ago, 1912Staver said:

Not sure about Studebaker specifically, however many manufacturers had a 5 passenger " sport touring " and a larger model 7 passenger " touring car" that usually featured fold out "jump seats".  Sometimes built in the same series / wheelbase, but often the 7 pas. would feature a slightly longer wheelbase. We all have a mental image of what a "speedster" should look like today. However in the early years terms like this were often applied to a sporty 5 passenger open top car. The body style definitions were often more loosely used in the old days than they are understood to mean today.

 

Greg in Canada

In researching it, it is definitely not what we think of as a speedster model today (i.e. the Auburn speedster).  Studebaker's advertising at the time definitely showed a touring type car as their speedster model.  I think you are correct in that it was a sporty 5 passenger open top car.  I guess it maybe had some extra trim, etc. as compared to their advertised "touring" model of the same year.  Thanks

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Marmon and Hudson also built "speedster" models in the early '20s. Generally, the "speedster" touring cars had about an inch or so lower sides on the body, and a slightly narrower rear seat than the full five passenger touring car. Some years ago, I went on a Nickel Age touring Club tour that had two Marmon speedsters on it (there was actually a third one in the club!), and a '21 Hudson speedster (said to be a four passenger due to the narrower rear seat).

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3 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

Marmon and Hudson also built "speedster" models in the early '20s. Generally, the "speedster" touring cars had about an inch or so lower sides on the body, and a slightly narrower rear seat than the full five passenger touring car. Some years ago, I went on a Nickel Age touring Club tour that had two Marmon speedsters on it (there was actually a third one in the club!), and a '21 Hudson speedster (said to be a four passenger due to the narrower rear seat).

Thanks, I thought it was something along what you explained.

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11 hours ago, Stude Light said:

I think you may be referring to their Roadster models rather than Speedster.  The Roadster was a 3 passenger car with a convertible top.  It gave up the back seat and added a covered luggage area (basically a trunk).  The touring cars also had a convertible top but included a back seat for 3 or 5 (added two folding jump seats) depending on the size of the car.

Thanks for the input.

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Not sure if you are on Facebook, but there is currently an interesting thread on "Studebaker Addicts" regarding a 1923 Speedster model.  Someone did post a vintage ad of a Speedster in that thread.

 

Craig

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7 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

Marmon and Hudson also built "speedster" models in the early '20s. Generally, the "speedster" touring cars had about an inch or so lower sides on the body, and a slightly narrower rear seat than the full five passenger touring car. Some years ago, I went on a Nickel Age touring Club tour that had two Marmon speedsters on it (there was actually a third one in the club!), and a '21 Hudson speedster (said to be a four passenger due to the narrower rear seat).

 4 passenger touring's are also sometimes referred to as torpedo bodywork. Or even gunboat's.  Small, fast, nimble. All sorts of loosely defined names have been used over the years to give the " sportier" versions of cars a more glamorous image. Plus lots of attempts at association with glamorous lifestyles. Pilots, country club set, captains of industry, even rouges and fringe of society daredevils.

 

Greg in Canada

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Marketing hasn't changed much in a hundred years (although I think it has gotten somewhat worse!). They  have always twisted language to give an illusion of something "better", "sportier", or simply something else you MUST have.

No wonder we today have so much trouble trying to figure out what we should call our cars! Is it a "two-door sedan"? Is it a "coach"? Or maybe a "five passenger coupe"? All describe the same enclosed body "forward set" two door car with folding seats in the front to gain access into the rear bench seat. Just different names by different marques, in different years of marketing.

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Good afternoon. I am rebuilding a Studebaker six-cylinder from 1917. When I rescue the mechanics I had several missing, which I have managed to get, however I have started with the restoration of the engine and I still find some missing, I ask for help to get and allow me be able to put into operation Respecting originality as much as possible.
In particular I am looking for the "bendix" system that goes on the front outer tip of the crankshaft. And the gear and cover system for the installation of magneto or distributor. This parts are the same in Studebaker 4 cylinders. I add two photos in order to visually identify both parts. I will appreciate who has or can get them, send me photos and the price. (by message via Facebook and / or mail to rodriguezdieguez@cpenet.com.ar) and / or. WhatsApp 54 9 2954 737395. I am from Santa Rosa, La Pampa Argentina. I have been collecting parts for this project for more than 15 years, which I have finally started to repair.
Any kind of collaboration is appreciated. greets Atte Enzo Rodríguez Dieguez

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