Jump to content

1918 E-4-34 Running After 54 (or so) Years


ADade
 Share

Recommended Posts

I've been working for some time on my father-in-law's 1918 four cylinder two seater, and we've finally got it running reliably (at least it seems so).  Long hours have gone into getting the car mechanically back in shape that I just couldn't resist sharing our success.

 

We still have a few items to sort out before I can tour with the car:

-   Adjust brakes

-    Install new float in oil sump

-    Finalize a couple of electrical improvements

 

But before the leaves fall, I should be driving the car!  WHOO HOO!

 

Pictures below.  I tried to upload a video of the engine running (quite fun to watch with its exposed valve train), but it was too large.

IMG_2783.JPG

IMG_2782.JPG

IMG_2781.JPG

IMG_2780.JPG

IMG_2779.JPG

Edited by ADade (see edit history)
  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Ben Perfitt said:

Nice nice car.

When you do that, look up and make sure you see what is in the 1st picture below and NOT the 2nd (same engine - 1918 E-4-35).

 

 

 

He's only replacing the float in the oil pan. All he has to do is unscrew the oil gauge and pull the float out the side of the oil pan, the float comes out with it.

 

Hey ADade, the float is a cork from a wine bottle. Don't bother trying to fix the old cork. Buick never sold corks, there are no replacement corks in the parts book, no part number or anything...….they come from wine bottles. Get one at the liquor store. 

 

Really

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well to give you the "rest of the story" as Paul Harvey used to say, I also want to replace the oil pan gasket, so I do need to take off the pan  It makes sense to inspect the wrist pin when the pan is off.  As to the float, I have a new one made of plastic, so I'll use that rather than a cork one.  It was designed for a Model A Ford, but should work just fine.  I used the same thing for the float in the fuel tank.

Edited by ADade (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...