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Driveway restoration


Restorer32
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For the first time in a long time I have seen a young local couple working on their early 1930's cars in their driveway/home garage. It is heartening to see young people in the hobby.  From talking to them it is obvious the antique car bug has completely infected them beyond any hope of cure. Every year we invite one or two of our younger customers to join us in the Hershey flea market, usually their first time.  If they don't have the bug already they sure do after experiencing Hershey.

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yeah there are a few shade tree's still out there and some young(er) do it yourselfers.  I am one of them, though not a young one, more in the middle. Yeah older folks call me a young gun then younger folks call me old man, t o each their own. However i have been working on my 1929 Chevrolet for just over 6 years now, and everyone that comes by to see it or drives by and sees me out working on it always asks, who did the work. They all seem really surprised when i say i did most of the work myself minus paint, and interior (Thanks Ted [Chistech]).

 

i really enjoy going out and spending time working on it, learning about it, and not so much fighting with it, but all in the tasks. I really enjoy solving problems and finding solutions.

 

and have to say the PRIDE in the results are much greater when you get the results yourself !! and some help from good friends...

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Well, it certainly can be done if one is willing to put in the time, and investment in learning, tools.  When I was 14, 15, my pal Rick who was 17, 18 at the time did a frame up restoration on his 39 Chevy, it took 2, 3 years.  Of course he had the advantage of summers basically full time plus.  His dad knew his stuff, and taught him a lot but he did 95% of the work other than chrome and interior.  The two of us extracted the body from the frame, nearly killed us when it slipped off a makeshift stand.  A few months later, 4 or 5 of us walked it back onto the frame.  A lot of fun. I eventually did my own but since I farmed out body, paint and engine I hesitate to say that I restored it in my driveway.  Rick's Chevy is still competitive today at local meets.

 

Start with a complete, sound car, and your chances of finishing are 100% better.

 

You will need time.  That is as big an obsticle as money or skill.  Young families should be all in, which can be tough, seems like people are busier today.  But I would still like to do one at home one day, likely upon retirement...

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1 hour ago, BearsFan315 said:

yeah there are a few shade tree's still out there and some young(er) do it yourselfers.  I am one of them, though not a young one, more in the middle. Yeah older folks call me a young gun then younger folks call me old man, t o each their own. However i have been working on my 1929 Chevrolet for just over 6 years now, and everyone that comes by to see it or drives by and sees me out working on it always asks, who did the work. They all seem really surprised when i say i did most of the work myself minus paint, and interior (Thanks Ted [Chistech]).

 

i really enjoy going out and spending time working on it, learning about it, and not so much fighting with it, but all in the tasks. I really enjoy solving problems and finding solutions.

 

and have to say the PRIDE in the results are much greater when you get the results yourself !! and some help from good friends...

And- it's worth adding that Jerry and his wife Ellen (and entire family) are Tidewater Region members we're rather proud of.  They are very involved in club activities.  Ellen is our Region Secretary and they are both essential in planning our annual fall show-Wings and Wheels, held at the Va Beach Aviation Museum.  We're all hopeful that great Chevy is on the show-field this year.

Terry

 

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Terry, glad you put a name to Bears Fan. I do not understand anonymity on most forums. Sure if you want to cuss someone out!😁

 

I got got my start in the driveway also.  Painted many cars in the driveway. Even a large box truck. That one had the neighbor worried!😲

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I do all my work in the drive way and only get things done by someone else when I don't have the tools (or skill to do it myself) and they're not easily acquired (e.g. a mill). I rebuilt the motor for the 1922 Cadillac on the drive way and small workshop (no room for a car in there)

 

Property prices are insane in Australian capitals, so it's going to be an ongoing problem here ($1m+ median price in Melbourne/Sydney)

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1 hour ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

Seeing the topic's heading of "Driveway Restoration,"

I thought someone was asking about tips for good asphalt paving!

Yes, that was my first thought too!  I just had my driveway resealed and I was curious to see if a new compound was on the market.

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2 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

Seeing the topic's heading of "Driveway Restoration,"

I thought someone was asking about tips for good asphalt paving!

 

Ha, I think my folks might want that - the cad has certainly marked its territory a few times 

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All of my early car work from age 15 to 24 was done in my parents single car garage and gravel driveway, everything from drivetrain swaps to complete paint jobs. Nothing like changing a manual transmission on your back on gravel! We were lucky to live in an unincorporated area at that time so there were no "rules". Many people worked on their own cars so no one got upset if you left a car outside for awhile with the hood off. Today you need to work inside or live in a rural area to avoid the "neighborhood watch"...

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2 hours ago, Bhigdog said:

Yup. Bumper jack and a big piece of card board......bob

 

 I'll be 63 in December and don't have a lift or creeper. I get my cars up on jack stands and put cardboard down and "slide around" on that. Works well. And when the cardboard gets worn I recycle it and start over with other pieces.

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7 minutes ago, DAVES89 said:

 

 I'll be 63 in December and don't have a lift or creeper. I get my cars up on jack stands and put cardboard down and "slide around" on that. Works well. And when the cardboard gets worn I recycle it and start over with other pieces.

 

Dave if you're like me I'll bet you are constantly scanning the side of the road for big screen TV boxes that someone has put out with the trash. They are the best cardboard you can get for us carport mechanics.  🤣

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1 minute ago, Ronnie said:

 

Dave if you're like me I'll bet you are constantly scanning the side of the road for big screen TV boxes that someone has put out with the trash. They are the best cardboard you can get for us carport mechanics.  🤣

 

Yup. Me too. Then I bought a two post lift. .......................Bob

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7 hours ago, Ronnie said:

 

Dave if you're like me I'll bet you are constantly scanning the side of the road for big screen TV boxes that someone has put out with the trash. They are the best cardboard you can get for us carport mechanics.  🤣

I just watch my neighbor [who have teenagers and are always buying "big stuff" and my kids. We also had a some purchases of larger items so I good for a long while. Especially because other then oil changes most of my work now is just brakes and in the engine bay stuff from the top.

 Although I did have the radiator/water pump/ transmission lines swap episode on the Red less then a month ago so I went through a bit of cardboard... 

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12 hours ago, DAVES89 said:

 

 I'll be 63 in December and don't have a lift or creeper. I get my cars up on jack stands and put cardboard down and "slide around" on that. Works well. And when the cardboard gets worn I recycle it and start over with other pieces.

I'm 70 and doing the same. My cardboard collection is extensive as I also need it to soak up the drips from my leaky old cars.

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My worst driveway job was changing the clutch cable in my Volvo in mid winder with about 8" of snow on the ground and the temperature in the single digits. I had to start by shoveling the snow out of the way so I could get the jack in to put the car up on stands... and go in every 10 minutes or so to un-freeze my fingers.

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My neighbors can’t fit their large SUVs in the driveway, much less actually work on them.  I’m an outcast in the stereotypical neighborhood where the car payments are more than the house payment.  My neighbor immediately diagonal from me “bought” a new Escalade this year.  A $90,000 vehicle that he often parks in the street (even though street parking is not allowed) in front of his $175,000 house.  They don’t get me and I don’t get them lol.

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FYI, if the cardboard has absorbed grease, oil and antifreeze, just trash it. All that crap has to be washed out of cardboard during recycling, costing the recycle process more, negating having a recycle supply stream. Same with pizza boxes that are greasy, just put them in the trash.

 

I too use cardboard more than a creeper. Some 3/4 ply (or OSB) under the car also helps in a gravel driveway.😉

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Would this qualify as per thread title ? 

Photos from +/- 30 years and tens of thousands of miles ago (with the subject car).

Other than final paint which was done couple of years later once I got the shop I’m still operating out of today, the car was completely rebuilt/restored(?) to a well running and driving bundle of fun it still is today from a literal basket case with no running gear, almost all the work was performed in that garage and on that driveway.

And amazingly, all done late at nights and on weekends in less than a year at a total out-of-pocket cost (i.e. excluding labor) of less than five figures, including the purchase price and transportation costs from upstate NY to SoCal.

 

BCFD3DB4-DEAB-4AD1-894E-C89269036B73.jpeg

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
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4 hours ago, Restorer32 said:

I once changed the fuel pump [under the rear of the car] on my MGB along US 30 on a 13 degree morning. Amazing what you can do when you are young and broke.

... or just young and easily gullible with innuendos offered by a car owner who happens to be a very attractive member of the opposite sex.

The sheer anticipation can get one to lay atop of some used, dirty cardboard on a cold & snowy/slushy/wet driveway to repair & weld up a leaky exhaust, so that the car could pass (government mandated) annual inspection required for registration renewal. 

Sorry, no pictures of the car, driveway, repairs or immediate consequences of the alleged incident nearly 4 decades ago. 😉 

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
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34' X 48' and two four post lifts plus a 3 car attached. I struggled for years and years. Not anymore. If I didn't have this I wouldn't be in the hobby as my body wouldn't take it- I think it has something to do with gravity;

Image preview

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 8/1/2019 at 2:42 PM, C Carl said:

Huh !! Well, I'm 75, and I was embarrassed being an old man slumming around to beat the recycler while making my rounds. You all have made me feel a bit more "normal". Thanks guys !   -   Carl 

   C Carl,  No need to slum around for cardboard.  Wal-Mart has 4' X 4' cardbosrds for free.  Go to the bottled water department and you'll find it between the

    levels of cased bottled water.  I use them for drip finders under our 10 vehicles,  I've heard them called Polish Creepers too.  I think you are normal also.

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