mike6024

1922 Chevy truck - $3000 russian river, Calif, not mine

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I used to know a guy who had a 1926 Chevy truck that he restored completely a long time ago. After owing it for a while he realized that it really was impractical and allowed the Wisconsin Auto Museum in Hartford to put it on display.   Last time I saw it was maybe 7 years ago or so. Interesting trucks.

Edited by plymouthcranbrook (see edit history)

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It is an interesting truck but I doubt it's a 1922. Looks like an amalgam of 1926 through 1928 parts, but that's what a typical truck would have been after a few years' use.

 

Don

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truck is my new winter project...and yes it is a 1925 or 1926 but titled as a 1922.

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You live in New York and bought it to ship cross country?

 

 

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I was going to fly out and drive it home. I see from your location you were only 20 miles away. If I like them I buy them not in it for the profit only the fun.

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Modified the cab a little...not sure if I could of driven it home but runs nice here around town....looking forward to next years winter project!!!

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Nice job in making the cab more usable/safe.

Did you by any chance save any of the wood that was there?

If you have, that could add to potential appeal when you’re done playing with it.

At least for me it was that body that appealed. Long needed an excuse to modify the garage my grandfather built for much shorter 50’s vehicles, but that would be a few years out.

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On 11/3/2019 at 10:32 AM, Ben Perfitt said:

Nice job in making the cab more usable/safe.

Did you by any chance save any of the wood that was there?

If you have, that could add to potential appeal when you’re done playing with it.

At least for me it was that body that appealed. Long needed an excuse to modify the garage my grandfather built for much shorter 50’s vehicles, but that would be a few years out.

  Yes saved the wood doors much of the body and pick up flooring is original...the new doors can come off for a more open C cab version but my wife wanted the doors to feel safer.

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Great to hear that.

It was the remarkable condition of the wood in this California truck that first caught my attention (as pictured in the original CL ad., top below). At 90+ years old it appeared to be in better condition than a similar truck pictured below, bottom, at only 8 years old. In the CL ad. it appeared pretty much exactly as a working truck would have appeared at just a few years old.


That truck is remembered to be a 1926 Chevy, though hard to tell as it was a typical farm truck repaired with whatever parts were obtainable during the depression. Within a couple years of these incidental photos the wood body was so shot from Michigan weather it was removed and the truck was converted into a ‘buzz saw’ for wood. It survived in that form into the 1960’s.

(That picture was posted before but deleted as it was out of a family album, but on second thoughts — I just don’t see the harm in it.

The little girl with her coat fully buttoned up just turned 90.)

 

Enjoy your truck!

Ben P.

 

 

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That truck needed a few things totaling about $1000 in parts. In my opinion it brought pretty strong money for a 35-40mph vehicle. I believe the wood was all recreated and not original.

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Original for these early years trucks was just a commercial chassis from the factory and the body was added as needed for your application.  The bodies were custom from local wood guys using available iron hardware or in some cases by coach builders .  The Model T had a few after market bodies available and I imagine Chevrolet did as well. Modified mine (rustic) so I could fit in it through the drivers door past the steering wheel.  OKIMG_2621.thumb.JPG.4aa9308a4874ce964a80f2614c6f4d4d.JPG for my purposes.  My granddaughter learned to drive standard shift on this last week end and drove into town to get the Xmas tree.  Maybe there is hope that the next generation will take a liking to these old relics.

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Well, guess the memory skipped a bit. That family truck lived on without the rotted wood body for a while - before being converted into a buzz-saw for wood. These photos were taken some time between 1941-45.

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