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for those who built a vertical automatic wheel turn for painting       what have you found a good speed is    ?

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I used a gear reduction motor about 12 RPM.  I made mine about 6 feet long on a sawhorse, with wheels on each end.  Lesson number one!!!!  do not stop the motor till they are dry

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I used a small table and walked around it.

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I adapted an old (fairly well built) BBQ rotisserie (found at a Salvation Army Store), built a simple stand, a removable shaft and several clamps and adapters to hold a variety of old style wheels. I didn't alter the speed at all, and it seems to work fine. It may be a bit fast for ease of painting, but I usually do have to go around a few times to get good coverage. I can actually put two wheels on it at a time, however I find that makes painting difficult. Usually, just one wheel, paint and work on other stuff for a couple hours while the paint sets nice.

For whatever it is worth? I usually use it for wooden spoke wheels. But it should work okay with other types as well.

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I have only done wire wheels, but I do most of the painting from the back to get all the angles on the spokes.  I think I did three angles from the back and two quick ones from the front.  With the wheel spinner I hold the gun in one position and count how long it takes to make a rotation.  My Uncle always said "thin to win" more light coats = better adhesion.  I like to talk to the oldest person at the paint store, each brand of paint has its favorite methods of application.

 

Good Luck, I used zinc chromate primer, acrylic enamel top coat, the plan was to clear coat them someday after striping.

Nothing feels better than a nice shinny wheels, until you try to mount tires without chipping the paint, another thread...

 

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Got allot of ideas about painting wire wheels        thanks all           this is what I cam up with       double duty with my tire changer    had a spare hub and PVC on front side   spin manually       

WW 1.JPG

WW 2.JPG

WW 3.JPG

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After you have painted a few dozen wire and wood wheels you will be able to paint them with no runs or missed spot by simply turning them by hand while mounted on a pipe hanging by chains from the ceiling of your paint booth. This is sort of a test we subject anyone wanting to paint for us to.  Don't forget to paint the inside of the lip that shows when tires are mounted. Practice, practice, practice.

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I set up a spindle with a "zero-max" electric motor with a variable speed drive.  The base on the floor is in my case happens to be a Stuart light M3 tank track drive sprocket drum.   ( I still have items like this to use for useful purposes.  My father and one of his friends owned about 200 light and medium WW2 tanks, bought from army disposal auction sales.   The 27 ton General Lee tanks were mostly too heavy and thirsty to be economical and useful for most small farmers; so at one stage they were auctioned in lots of twenty, at six pounds ten shillings and nine pounds ten shillings a piece.   One of my father's deer-hunting and saw milling friends paid twenty pounds (as he thought) for one Lee, but then found he was bound to take the other nineteen as well.   Dad paid Les Christian back his twenty quid, and took the other nineteen.  Dad and his partner owned a fenced paddock directly opposite the auction depot at Bandiana; so they just had to start and drive the tanks across the road and into their yard.    Les is still fit, healthy and unimpaired , well through his tenth decade;  though he no longer follows the hunting dogs through the heavy bush.)      I made a series of wooden cones to carry the wheels when they are sprayed and until the two-pack has fully dried and hardened.       You paint outside in fine warm weather, with the wheel revolving at slow speed so you can see you have perfect cover.  Insects stay clear when you are spraying; then as soon as you have enough on, you advance the speed with the hand lever, and the insects will not park on the moving wheel, and neither will the paint sag or run.  You leave it turn till the paint has fully hardened and cross-linked.

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