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Try going with a 160 Thermostat verses a 180.  Also, a thermostat is a good thing as it acts as a flow restrictor often more so than a thermostat - keeps fluid in radiator for a certain amount of cooling time.  Also, on the suction side of water pump make sure there is a coiled wire in the radiator hose to stop collapse under load - a water pump can be very powerful.  Also, when tube is out wish around and make sure you so not have sediment in the head - you can always poke around and then flush with a garden hose prior to installing your new radiator. 

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12 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

Take your distribution tube to the radiator shop and have them solder up the damage - it is brass so easy to do.  


x 2. Why not recycle a known good tube with a simple repair. Any shop guy worth their salt should be able to repair that to new. And while it is out a great opportunity to flush the system thoroughly. So many of the “aftermarket” items look the same but never fit as the genuine parts do. 

Good thread, keep going,

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀😀

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Posted (edited)

Round 2. Success!!!

 

I was reminded by a friend that I own a spare Canadian 25" engine. I got a second chance, and removed the brass tube. Experience and a better tool helped me get this one out perfectly. I cleaned it up a little, as it was in great shape and installed it in my 1938  Plymouth. The car will be running again today!

 

 

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

This week was all about the cooling system in my old '38.  I took come videos. I forgot to record a lot of the job. I accidentally deleted some video as well. LOL. Oh well it was fun.

 

I tried to up my level of video quality and editing. I even recorded my own sound track on this one. A first for me! 

 

 There's some great looking videos on You Tube. It's not always good content...However visually appealing. I will try to keep my level of technical content up. Additionally I'll try to clean up and make my videos more appealing. Here's the next episode.....Thanks for following along. 

 

 

 

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

I am happy to say that my cooling system maintenance work has the engine performing very well. 100F  here again yesterday. I waited until the dog-day temperatures sunk in, in the later afternoon. I cruised all over town. I made sure to get into the slow downtown blocks of town. Where every short city block has another street light. The car gets little time at speeds of about 25 mph then it stops and idles for a while at a red light. Over and over, until you get through town. Then I turned around and did it again. The hottest I was reaching was the 180F mark on the temp gauge.  Then when I got some good distance at a cruising speed of 30 mph, the gauge would drop to 160F again. Then I hit the long hill home. I hit 182 to 185-ish by the time I got to the top. When I pulled in the drive way I shut it off and let the heat sink in. No overheating. No expulsion from the overflow hose. 

 

This weather is about as hot as it gets in this part of the world. Any hotter, the car is not coming out anyway. I am happy with the results. Big improvement, as I was going over 200 mark climbing the hill home when in 100F ambient temps.   Money well spent and much needed anyway. A leaky rad is not good. There is one more thing I need to address before I plan a longer road trip....Window wipers. I do not have a functioning set. I will get on this soon. Then, I am pretty darn confident I can venture far from home in this old jalopy. It's come so far from what it was when I purchased it. 

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

I took my '38 on its first major hi-way cruise yesterday. I traveled about 120 miles. Speeds at about 50 MPH the entire trip. It ran very well. I had zero issues.

 

Just one point to note: I got on the road early, about 5:30AM. It was cool out, as I was traveling at about 4500 feet elevation. About 48F outside. At continuous 50 mph my temp gauge was reading about 115-120F. Climbing hills it warmed up more, on the flats, it cooled down again. I had my heat on, and at 115-120 on the gauge it was not making enough to heat cab much. I have an optional, vintage in cab heater that circulates coolant. Later in the day as ambient temps heated up, the temp gauge warmed up to the normal 160F range. I have a 160F thermostat in it.  I was thinking maybe my gauge is not reading accurately? However, if that were the case, I'd have plenty of cab heat yet show a cool temp on the gauge. I suspect the cooling system was indeed almost working too well. The engine running too cool. Why would this be?  If indeed the coolant was running tool cool, the thermostat should close and let the block run up to 160 again before opening.  I made sure to install the thermostat with the correct opening toward the rad flow. I could install a 180F thermostat. Seems to me it won't matter. It's going to run any hotter when it's cold outside. Maybe my new thermostat is sticking open?

 

Your comments are welcome.

Here is a pic from yesterdays drive. The sun was coming up. Which is why you see the pink colors in the sky. Notice my speed and temp gauge readings on the dash.

 

 

38 Cruise.jpg

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
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I would suspect your temp gauge but first I would test the thermostat in the kitchen. My ‘48 Packard had an erratic temp gauge which I never did get a round tuit to fixing......nice picture too. I try to get out for a pre dawn drive at least 3-4 times a week. Best time to drive our oldies!

Edited by Jeff Perkins / Mn (see edit history)
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Similar experience to what I had with my Model A Ford vacuum wiper several years ago. No parts available, gaskets tough to make on my own, some parts made out of unobtainium. I found a person in Arizona who sold refurbished motors and that was fine. Electrics are available for the A but, like you, I prefer the driving experience of an original style car. Glad to hear the Chrysler will get some exercise. Thanks for another interesting video!

Edited by Jeff Perkins / Mn (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

Most unfortunate times in the Northwest currently. We follow the fires and the many stories and really do feel a great sense of sadness for everyone affected. The smoke has even reached northern Minnesota making the sun red but not affecting air quality yet. Today the winds changed, coming from the north bringing in that cool clean Canadian air. 
Thanks again for posting another entertaining and informative video. I enjoy (and learn!) from every one. I always do my valve adjustment colds, save me from expanding my vocabulary in a bad way. Take care and stay in the garage to avoid that bad air!

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On 8/23/2020 at 8:17 AM, keithb7 said:

If indeed the coolant was running tool cool, the thermostat should close and let the block run up to 160 again before opening.  I made sure to install the thermostat with the correct opening toward the rad flow. I could install a 180F thermostat. Seems to me it won't matter. It's going to run any hotter when it's cold outside. Maybe my new thermostat is sticking open?

 

Hi Keith, I sometimes use a hand held temperature gun to check the temperature in a variety of spots such as entering the rad, exiting the rad, at the temp sensor in the block, even the coolant inside the rad.  That may give you an idea of the actual temperature and whether the  gauge and thermostat are operating properly.

Peter

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Thanks for checking in @PFindlay and @Jeff Perkins / Mn.  I am glad Jeff  to hear that you might pick up a little thing or two from my little chronicles.  These comments from you and many others are what help motivate me.  I do like the idea of maybe teaching a new younger generation a few tips to help keep these old cars alive and on the road. Peter, I have used a digital red-dot laser thermometer before. I forgot about that! I will try it on my '38 and take some readings.

 

Tonight I was out well past dark in a very rural, country area without any street lighting. No light of any kind. Just my 6V sealed beam round headlights. I had my auxiliary 6V amber fog lights too. Those helped a ton.  I did limit my use of the fog lights, thinking about the poor old generator trying to keep up. I took a rural winding dirt road. I was alone and and met no other vehicles. It could have easily been 1938. It was a fantastic feeling. The only thing missing was for an old AM radio playing with a song from the period.  Bias-ply skinny tires. The gravel rolling under them.  Strong arm steering. The car was purring so very nicely and quiet! I had the heater blower on, man that thing will cook you right out of the car.  30 mph seems fast in the black dark, with limited headlight power on a twisty gravel road. A great trip I won't soon forget.

 

My window defroster performance varies. It depends on what other high amp draws are pulling power. When the head lights are on hi-beam, fog lights on, dash lights on, the blower is not moving a ton of air. Even on the high fan setting. If I turn off the fog lamps, dash lamps, and headlights on low-beam only, then the old 6V blower motor really puts out. Then there is plenty of air up at the windshield. The blower sort of reminds me of the vacuum wipers... Intermittent performance at best, depending on engine vacuum. Lol. Ya gotta love these old cars and their quirks.

 

 

 

 

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Fall is here. The maiden year of my ‘38 is winding up. Its been a fantastic year with so many rewards, and much learning too.  What a fantastic hobby. 
 

It took over 1500 miles of driving, listening to,and feeling the road in my car to come up with a name. One day a name just appeared. Marg. After my mother.

 

She’s tough. She’s  endured some hard times. She’s not young. Her lines and scars show her experience. They both get a second look once in a while. From Seniors mainly. Lol!   She shall not be fully restored. She shall be maintained. She shall cruise with determination. For every mark shows her depth. With respect, Marg will cruise on. She’s high in miles but she ain’t rolled over yet.  Marg it is. Like my Mother. 

Today Marg was out rustling some leaves. Fall is in full bloom yet again. 82 falls have passed in her rear view mirror. Perhaps 82 more will some day. 
 

 

 

057A58B6-A085-4E08-95B7-A74881E1E3A9.jpeg
 

 

5A8FE7A2-3089-45ED-892B-9FC92F1847DD.jpeg

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
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Nice pictures Keith......you made the 82 yr. old gal look great!
 

Here is a quote from John Mereness that I like.....great simple advice that I think you followed quite well.

 

“Basically, enjoy your car, make it better every time you touch - little stuff, and after you have driven it a while then make more major decisions.”

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  • 2 weeks later...

Related to my '38 Plymouth, here in the next video I show folks how to determine what you may have there in that old flathead engine you've had in storage forever. Is it worth salvaging and rebuilding? What do I actually have here to start working with? A few tips and tools for the average backyard mechanic to figure out a few things.

 

 

 

 

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
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One goof up in my video above. 3 ⅜ as a fraction is 3.375. Not 3.380 as quoted in the video. Initially I had grabbed a calculator. Unknown to me, it was a "Business Calculator" with only 2 decimal points. 3.375 was rounded up to 3.38. I trusted it, not knowing it was rounding up. Doh!  Later using a proper, normal calculator to re-check...I was humiliated. 

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

My winter project is unfolding. Some new findings today. Stock, original bores. 3 ⅜“ bore x 4 ¼” stroke was measured. That confirms its a 228ci Canadian 25” long engine. 
 

It looks like someone was in there to address #6 exhaust valve at some point.  It’s valve top is dished. Slightly different than all the other valves. 
 

Some exhaust valve guide wear found on cylinder 1,2 and 6.  
 

Engine is coming out soon. Tranny will drop this week.  A progress video with all the details and my thoughts, will be on my YT channel soon. -K
 


 

 

59E231A1-7F54-4AE0-990C-002B2C1EA4FF.jpeg

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You have already convinced me (w/ great videos!) to make a vintage Mopar my next purchase. I’ll get there soon. One tip I learned about the guide pins I used for the trans removal....cut a slot in the end, makes it easier to install them (especially from underneath the car) with a small screwdriver. Years ago  I had to do four (!) clutches in my ‘69 Camaro  4 spd  car, no room to work. I think I still have the trans part number stamped on my chest from resting it there upon removal! Ugh......

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6 hours ago, JimKB1MCV said:

I know you realize where the metacenter of that engine crane is with the engine at that high angle. I held my breath till you lowered it down.

Good job, well presented.


Thanks. When making videos, I try to keep in mind all the folks who are new to old-car ownership. Pulling an engine is nothing new nor exciting to many of us. However there more  people on this planet every day who have no idea how it’s done. Young people who turn to You Tube for self-help and education. 
 

I agree that when the engine had to clear the car,  the centre of gravity was very near the edge of the invisible triangle of danger! My margin of error was extremely slim. This is why I dared not move the hoisted load. I rolled my car out from under it. Then I stood clear while I lowered the engine. The hoist was on level ground. Left alone, untouched, it would have likely taken an earthquake to topple it.

 

These old flathead engines are so very heavy.
 

I’m considering taking the rad nose cone off for installation. 

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
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With my hoist setup (beam in rafters) I have to pull the nose off of any car which I remove the engine. Then I have to roll the car back.  Always nervous when that huge lump of iron is hanging in the air.

I would pull the nose on the Plymouth if I was doing the install...I think the job would be easier that way. Sounds like you are headed in that direction.

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I’ve been progressing through engine tear down and inspection.  I see some valve guide wear. Seems to me the worst is #1 and #6 cylinder guides. 
 

Crank bearings measures within spec. However Some dirty oil has been going thru the bearings. Bearings and crank are a little frosted along the oil flow hole and oil channel. 
My tappets and cam look fantastic. I  need some valve reseal work.  I pulled #1 piston tonight and found a broken top ring. I stopped there for the night. I suspect I’ll find more broken piston rings as I remove more pistons.  Top piston ring groove appears to be worn about 0.014 wider than second compression ring.  I suspect from the broken piston ring floating around in there?

 

If I’m going with new pistons, I mights as well go to 3 7/16” bore. That’ll take my 25” long block, 4 ¼” stroke engine upto 237 ci. Currently is 3 ⅜” bore 228 ci.  I’ll take the crank In to the shop too. See what should be done. Maybe a polish. We’ll see. 
 

 

96F453B6-4624-4078-B54B-6561915C4144.jpeg

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As mentioned , the engine is currently a Canadian 25” long 3 ⅜” bore  x 4 ¼” stroke.  Netting 228 ci.  I am planning to bore it over to the more popular USA built Desoto S13 engine. 3 7/16” x 4 ¼”. Netting 237 ci.  My little car should scoot along very well with improved torque.  We shall see. My next major hurdle before progressing along is a hot tank soak followed by crack checking everything. 
 

I am very fortunate the broken piston ring did not come out of its groove and chew up my #1 cylinder. 
 

 

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