Ed Luddy

What does everyone think is high mileage these days?

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Bernie- I miss the mechanical choke I had on my 67 volvo. That car was splendid.

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I wrote mechanical not manual. A lot of cylinders got washed clean of lubricant due to faulty "automatic" mechanical chokes. Digital stuff works much better, even the early 3 minute heated ones.

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I bought a 1995 Ford Escort stick shift new and drove it over 221,000 miles.  When I bought it I had no idea it would even come close to going that far!

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We recently sold our 2006 Dodge Stratus with the dreaded 2.7 V6.  It had 197,000 miles and was running strong.

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She's 55 , has 3 kids from 2 prior marriages, 2 ex-husbands, got enough wrinkles in her face that only makes you wonder if you should be bothered with her in the first place, and is not into old cars....

That's high mileage......

 

Oh, you meant cars ?!?!?

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Posted (edited)
On 7/22/2019 at 6:53 PM, Ed Luddy said:

Who here has a daily driver approaching the 300K mark? I have 2007 GMC Yukon with 315,000 klms. Still runs good, some rust though. 

One of my dailies is a 2002 Nissan Altima SE with 220k miles on the clock.

The car has been amazingly reliable.  Replaced a fuel pressure regulator, one fuel injector, radiator and just regular maintenance stuff like plugs and axle boots.

Still runs and drives great.

Owned since new so it has always been well maintained.

As is typical for Nissan, the paint is shot but the interior still looks great.

Edited by zepher (see edit history)

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I have a 2005 gnc Yukon that I bought in 2007 that had 19,000 miles on it, today it has 485,000 miles (not kilometers) I have not touched the rear axle it transmission, can’t say that about the engine except I can honestly say that other than oil changes and a waterpump j did not even change spark plugs till 2015

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My daily driven 98 Ranger 4 cyl/5sp has 405k miles (650k kilometers). All drive train is original and I would start on any length trip with it tomorrow. The parts store in Princeton, Texas has a 98 Ranger delivery truck with 880k miles (1,400,000 kilometers) with original engine but a couple of transmissions and a number of clutches----kid drivers.

 

 

Ranger 001.jpg

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Lets talk about the used Chevy Vega with the aluminum engine i bought for my son. I don,t think it made it around the block before it looked like it was spraying for mosquitoes......bob

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Vegas were terrible cars.  They recast them as the Monza with the iron duke motor.  My wife bought a 78 for her first car before we were married.  What a POS that thing was.  If it was claiming a hill with the AC on and three people in it, I could almost out run it on foot.  

 

We managed to get a litttle over 100K out of it, but it was a battle all the way.  Front end was so flimsy that it just wouldn't stay in line so it ate tires.  Broke a bunch of little stuff but the engine or trans never failed.  It never ran well either.   It was so hateful that other people would just run into it.  I think it was hit three times.  Happy day when that one was traded in.  

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Posted (edited)

Back in the 1960s I would have thought 60,000 was high mileage, today it is more like 200,000 when I may consider it high mileage, but then again maybe not.

 

I bought a 1975 Saab new and drove it over 300,000 miles before giving it to my son to drive for a few more years.  Never any major work except 1 clutch plate at around 250,000 miles. I had it in for an inspection in 1983 with 130,000 miles and a custom was in the garage looking at it while I was waiting and his first question to the mechanic was "what year is this".  Then he looked at the odometer and said, "this Saab looks brand new, does it really have on 13,000 miles on it" and the mechanic said "you better look at the odometer again" and the next words out of his mouth were "HOLY $&%"

 

My next car was a  new 1986 Audi Coupe GT and I drove it for 350,000 miles when I gave it to my neighbor's son who drove it another 60,000 the last I had heard.  It only ever needed oil changes, brake pad, rotors and drums.  Never did any engine work and never replaced a clutch plate.

 

At the same time as the Audi I had 1986 Saab Turbo that I bought used at 35,000 miles and drove to over 300,000 when I gave it to my daughter, who drove it for a few more years. Then I bought a 1992 Saab Turbo that when for over 300,000 miles with no issues.

 

My current daily driver is a 2002 BMW Z3 with 190,000+ miles and never had an issue except for a Kenworth's front wheel that destroyed the left side on I-85 near Kannapolis, NC around 2008, when he could not see me and decided to change into my lane.  $12,000 and 11 years later it is still on the road and still looks nearly new.

 

I also have an all original 1984 BMW 633CSI with 130,000 miles on it that won an AACA Grand National award at Williamsport in 2016.

 

Edited by Vila (see edit history)

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On 7/23/2019 at 12:06 AM, Rusty_OToole said:

It would be interesting to see how an old flathead six from the forties or fifties would stand up if it were rebuilt with modern pistons, rings valves  and bearings and fuel injection and run on synthetic oil.

 

 

 

 Agree.  But, it is not just the engines.. The interiors last way longer.  "They don't make um like they usta!"  comes to mind.

 

  Ben

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Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, zepher said:

One of my dailies is a 2002 Nissan Altima SE with 220k miles on the clock.

The car has been amazingly reliable.  Replaced a fuel pressure regulator, one fuel injector, radiator and just regular maintenance stuff like plugs and axle boots.

Still runs and drives great.

Owned since new so it has always been well maintained.

As is typical for Nissan, the paint is shot but the interior still looks great.

The paint issue is not Nissan as it happens to all car of that era and even now. If you have had a chance to look at some of the Nissans in Mexico, Europe, Brazil etc. you would know that. The issue is constant government paint regulations that we have here that are continually being changed. Changed so fast that our paint suppliers/manufacturers have a hard time keeping up in the product development areas.

  My 2001 Xterra still has perfect paint, but the reason is it's always garaged and when it's not, like when I drove it to work I had a car cover on it. Same holds true for my 2012 and my 2019 Nissans. Before I retired you could always see the " Car Guys Cars" in the parking lot. They are easy to spot. Always as far as possible in parking lots,  Always parking in a "End Space" and as far over as possible to avoid door dings in a parking lot, and most of us with car covers on.

My 76 Oldsmobile I special ordered is also a case in point. It's still in it's original G.M. lacquer paint and was a daily driver for ten years. Today with still that original paint, interior, with a engine, trans and rear end, power steering pump, steering box, alternator..nothing that has never been apart, carburetor never been apart, original fuel pump, Air pump, original distributor module, spark plug wires, original brake front calipers, rear wheel cylinders, original rear brake shoes, complete original exhaust including catalytic converter. Even the engine paint is original all at nearly 115,000 miles and Forty Three years old. Car guys take care of cars.

img_0124.jpg

CC170-dR-05-450x291.jpgCC170-dR-02-450x362.jpg

Edited by Pfeil (see edit history)

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Before I bought my '65 T Bird project last year, I was interested in a late '60's Lincoln Continental mk 3. The guy selling it was younger, so he believed the 100,000+ miles on it were "low miles." I tried gently explaining to him that cars of that era had a different life span than modern cars, but he probably thought it was a bargaining tactic. It certainly wasn't. I only bought cheap used cars as a kid back in the mid '70's, but even then I rarely considered buying cars with more than 100 k on the odo.

 

OTOH, I met a mechanic a dozen years ago who had an extremely clean and original '71 Monte Carlo that he claimed was his daily driver since he'd bought it near new back in '71. From what he said, I estimate that he'd put an average of 5 hours of maintenance a week in that car since he'd bought it. If you did stuff like that, you could make even those old cars last. He said it had like 350,000 miles on it.

 

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, Pfeil said:

The paint issue is not Nissan as it happens to all car of that era and even now. If you have had a chance to look at some of the Nissans in Mexico, Europe, Brazil etc. you would know that. The issue is constant government paint regulations that we have here that are continually being changed. Changed so fast that our paint suppliers/manufacturers have a hard time keeping up in the product development areas.

  My 2001 Xterra still has perfect paint, but the reason is it's always garaged and when it's not, like when I drove it to work I had a car cover on it. Same holds true for my 2012 and my 2019 Nissans. Before I retired you could always see the " Car Guys Cars" in the parking lot. They are easy to spot. Always as far as possible in parking lots,  Always parking in a "End Space" and as far over as possible to avoid door dings in a parking lot, and most of us with car covers on.

My 76 Oldsmobile I special ordered is also a case in point. It's still in it's original G.M. lacquer paint and was a daily driver for ten years. Today with still that original paint, interior, with a engine, trans and rear end, power steering pump, steering box, alternator..nothing that has never been apart, carburetor never been apart, original fuel pump, Air pump, original distributor module, spark plug wires, original brake front calipers, rear wheel cylinders, original rear brake shoes, complete original exhaust including catalytic converter. Even the engine paint is original all at nearly 115,000 miles and Forty Three years old. Car guys take care of cars.

 

 

 

I would argue that I am a 'car guy'.

My '29 Pierce has original paint.

Never been outside overnight except when attending multi-day tours.

Always covered when in the garage.

 

I regularly waxed and maintained the paint on the Nissan.

Still went to crap because it stays outside while my 20's cars and my projects are in the garage.

99% of all the Nissans of that same vintage look the same way mine does.

Around here it is well over 100* for days on end in the summer.

That kind of sun is brutal on paint.

Yet, my sister in law had a Toyota Camry around the same year that she rarely washed and never waxed, except for the few times I did it for her because I felt sorry for the car.

Paint was perfect when she got rid of it a few years ago and silver is notorious for oxidizing and fading.

 

And since we're showing off our cars, here's one of mine.  😀

 

IMG_0211-1.JPG

Edited by zepher (see edit history)
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I had three Vega GTs (one that had been totaled) and an Astre wagon. Since all had AC they had real radiators and as I always run engines cool they were never any trouble. Also had a 78 Sunbird with V8 and broke about everything possible. But then I raced it.

 

My 70 Judge requires very little maintenance.

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Currently in my driveway I have

1- 1994 F-150- 207 000 kms Purchased in 98 with 106 000km. (5.8l 351engine)

2-2004 Cavalier- 402 000kms Purchased in 2005 with 5000kms.  2.2L with a 5 speed tranny my wife drove it first, then I drove it, when my oldest son turned 16 he drove it, since he bought a new car 8 months ago I am back driving it again, It just keeps on going, this cars has been the lowest maintenance car I have ever owed.

3-2009 Ford Flex -347 000kms Purchased in 2012 with 67 000km. this is the highest maintenance car I have ever owed, but my wife loves this car and so comfy to drive and travel in.(3.5L engine)

4-2011 Ford Escape Purchased in 2017 with 117 000km and currently with 176 000kms. which my younger son now drives since he got his license 6 months ago, hence me moving back to the Cavalier.(3.0 L engine in Escape)

And to keep this old car related

5- 1920 Model t Ford built in 1992, motor rebuilt in 1996 has approx. 60 000 miles on it. Have had to take up shims twice for rods .005" and mains once .002".

 

We keep on thinking we need to look at purchasing something newer with less miles but I have not got to the point where the maintenance cost exceed my idea on when to fix or not to fix.. I think as others have said, knowing alot of the history on these cars and all the maintenance that has been done on them allows me some sort of trust and ability to keep on driving them, and as you can tell we do drive them alot. My best advise is don't forget to change your oil on a regular basis,( everyone has their own opinion on when that is). I also Oil spray which makes a huge difference in our Canadian climate with all the salt and sand that gets put on our roads in the winter.

 

Jeff

 

 

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I have a 03 Chevy Tahoe approaching 200,000 trouble free  miles. It seems good for another 200,000. As far as paint it still looks good and it has  been outside most of its life. The leather seats are good except some normal wear on the drivers side. I would trust it to go anywhere.

 

Grandson had a 2001 Chevy pickup he uses for hunting and with even the abuse it takes, it is over 300,000 miles and still on the original drivetrain.

 

So true they do not build them like they used to. (thank goodness)

 

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10 hours ago, zepher said:

 

I would argue that I am a 'car guy'.

My '29 Pierce has original paint.

Never been outside overnight except when attending multi-day tours.

Always covered when in the garage.

 

I regularly waxed and maintained the paint on the Nissan.

Still went to crap because it stays outside while my 20's cars and my projects are in the garage.

99% of all the Nissans of that same vintage look the same way mine does.

Around here it is well over 100* for days on end in the summer.

That kind of sun is brutal on paint.

Yet, my sister in law had a Toyota Camry around the same year that she rarely washed and never waxed, except for the few times I did it for her because I felt sorry for the car.

Paint was perfect when she got rid of it a few years ago and silver is notorious for oxidizing and fading.

 

And since we're showing off our cars, here's one of mine.  😀

 

IMG_0211-1.JPG

Apparently you didn't read my comments thoroughly so I will reiterate for you again. The paint in the years you described for your Nissan was terrible, and not just for Nissans and due mostly from government regulations. I have a 2001 Xterra of that era, however being in the auto industry and also knowing that paint from cars built in this country ( including Nissan ) going way back to the 70's you needed to take special precautions like covering your car when it's in the sun, and that's why the paint on my 2001 Xterra and my 76 Oldsmobile is in such good condition. Being a car guy doesn't mean you take excellent care of your antique vehicles, it also means you take care of all your vehicles. Parking away from the crowds, taking a end space, and covering your daily driven car is all a part of it. And later these are the cars that turn up later in your survivor class.     

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I bought a loaded 1988 Buick Electra T-type new and it was one of the best cars I ever owned. It had the 3.8 V-6 and we kept it until the early 2000s, my older son took it to college and my younger son drove it to high school. We put 157,000 miles on it and it still ran and drove great but all of the electrical power equipment started to fail so we donated it. What brought it to mind was the paint comments above. It was a black car and when it was about 8 years old the paint on the upper surfaces started to drastically fade. Turned out that was one of the first years GM used water based paint and they had left out the UV protection. GM repainted my whole car for free and the repaint looked good until we got rid of the car.

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2 hours ago, Pfeil said:

Apparently you didn't read my comments thoroughly so I will reiterate for you again. The paint in the years you described for your Nissan was terrible, and not just for Nissans and due mostly from government regulations. I have a 2001 Xterra of that era, however being in the auto industry and also knowing that paint from cars built in this country ( including Nissan ) going way back to the 70's you needed to take special precautions like covering your car when it's in the sun, and that's why the paint on my 2001 Xterra and my 76 Oldsmobile is in such good condition. Being a car guy doesn't mean you take excellent care of your antique vehicles, it also means you take care of all your vehicles. Parking away from the crowds, taking a end space, and covering your daily driven car is all a part of it. And later these are the cars that turn up later in your survivor class.     

 

I read it all.

That is why I mentioned the 2003 Camry that hd near perfect paint when it was sold a few years ago.

The Camry was very neglected and the paint still looked great.

About a year after I bought my 2002 Nissan (purchased new in late 2001) someone decided to back into the right, rear passenger door and just take off.

Found a replacement door so I wouldn't have lots of bondo on a new car and had the entire side repainted since it has a slight metallic so everything would match.

That side of the car still looks great where the other side is shot.

Nissan paint of that era sucks.

Was on a Nissan owner's board for years and everyone complained about the quality of the paint.

Funny thing is, Inifiti cars of the same era don't seem to have the same paint issues.

 

And my car looks almost new inside.

Very minor wear on the leather or anywhere else.

Looks new under the hood.

If I had the car repainted no one would believe the miles from the way it would look, run and drive.

The other half just shakes her head when I say I have to wash and wax our cars.

I know she thinks I do it too often.

But parking away from people in a parking lot doens't work most times in So Cal. Parking lots aren't big enough for that.

And put a cover on your car in a parking lot?  It will be stolen in most places even with a cable lock.

Some of us don't live in Mayberry.

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6 hours ago, coachJC said:

Currently in my driveway I have

1- 1994 F-150- 207 000 kms Purchased in 98 with 106 000km. (5.8l 351engine)

2-2004 Cavalier- 402 000kms Purchased in 2005 with 5000kms.  2.2L with a 5 speed tranny my wife drove it first, then I drove it, when my oldest son turned 16 he drove it, since he bought a new car 8 months ago I am back driving it again, It just keeps on going, this cars has been the lowest maintenance car I have ever owed.

3-2009 Ford Flex -347 000kms Purchased in 2012 with 67 000km. this is the highest maintenance car I have ever owed, but my wife loves this car and so comfy to drive and travel in.(3.5L engine)

4-2011 Ford Escape Purchased in 2017 with 117 000km and currently with 176 000kms. which my younger son now drives since he got his license 6 months ago, hence me moving back to the Cavalier.(3.0 L engine in Escape)

And to keep this old car related

5- 1920 Model t Ford built in 1992, motor rebuilt in 1996 has approx. 60 000 miles on it. Have had to take up shims twice for rods .005" and mains once .002".

 

We keep on thinking we need to look at purchasing something newer with less miles but I have not got to the point where the maintenance cost exceed my idea on when to fix or not to fix.. I think as others have said, knowing alot of the history on these cars and all the maintenance that has been done on them allows me some sort of trust and ability to keep on driving them, and as you can tell we do drive them alot. My best advise is don't forget to change your oil on a regular basis,( everyone has their own opinion on when that is). I also Oil spray which makes a huge difference in our Canadian climate with all the salt and sand that gets put on our roads in the winter.

 

Jeff

 

 

We had three Cavaliers starting in 1983 and all of them were reliable, cheap to operate and easy to work on. Each lasted at least 150,000 miles and except for the last one, had to be gotten rid of due to rust issues. Cavaliers rusted from the inside out eventually causing the suspension to become dangerous. I would buy another in a minute if not like my Astro that the newest one is 14 years old.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, zepher said:

 

I read it all.

That is why I mentioned the 2003 Camry that hd near perfect paint when it was sold a few years ago.

The Camry was very neglected and the paint still looked great.

About a year after I bought my 2002 Nissan (purchased new in late 2001) someone decided to back into the right, rear passenger door and just take off.

Found a replacement door so I wouldn't have lots of bondo on a new car and had the entire side repainted since it has a slight metallic so everything would match.

That side of the car still looks great where the other side is shot.

Nissan paint of that era sucks.

Was on a Nissan owner's board for years and everyone complained about the quality of the paint.

Funny thing is, Inifiti cars of the same era don't seem to have the same paint issues.

 

And my car looks almost new inside.

Very minor wear on the leather or anywhere else.

Looks new under the hood.

If I had the car repainted no one would believe the miles from the way it would look, run and drive.

The other half just shakes her head when I say I have to wash and wax our cars.

I know she thinks I do it too often.

But parking away from people in a parking lot doens't work most times in So Cal. Parking lots aren't big enough for that.

And put a cover on your car in a parking lot?  It will be stolen in most places even with a cable lock.

Some of us don't live in Mayberry.

I lived for over 50 years in the So.Cal. beach communities which happen to be the most densely populated areas of the state. When I lived in Hermosa beach the population was 40,000+ people and that is a city of one square mile. I'm not saying you have to cover your car every time you go to the grocery store, but sitting in the sun for 8hrs while you are work is not unreasonable for a cover to go on.

 I see plenty of all makes even relatively new cars today ( less than five years ) that the clear coats are gone . A very good clear coat thinner and remover is your local car wash. Always wash by hand, always polish by hand. Wash and hand polish out of the sun. 

Edited by Pfeil (see edit history)

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1 hour ago, Pfeil said:

I lived for over 50 years in the So.Cal. beach communities which happen to be the most densely populated areas of the state. When I lived in Hermosa beach the population was 40,000+ people and that is a city of one square mile. I'm not saying you have to cover your car every time you go to the grocery store, but sitting in the sun for 8hrs while you are work is not unreasonable for a cover to go on.

 I see plenty of all makes even relatively new cars today ( less than five years ) that the clear coats are gone . A very good clear coat thinner and remover is your local car wash. Always wash by hand, always polish by hand. Wash and hand polish out of the sun. 

 

Hermosa is a much nicer part of So Cal than the inland area when I live.

People tend to be more respectful in nicer communities.

 

I never, ever, use an automatic car wash.

I wash at home and use the 2 bucket method with grit guards in the buckets.

Outside gets a dose of spray finish/polish if I am not waxing it immediately after.

Most of my supplies come from a warehouse that sells to car detailers and car washes.

Cars get clay barred (I have both med and fine clay bars depending on what needs to come off the paint), polished, sealed and waxed regularly.

I don't do a paint correction as often as I should since I don't usually have time to tape off all the trim before I dig in.

Been thinking about buying a foam gun since the results I have seen are pretty impressive without much, if any at all, manual wiping of the paint during the washing phase.

 

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GM had some real problems in the late '80s/early 90s with paint. Reattas got a water based paint that did not work very well and had a lot of peeling issues. Modern base coat/clear coat is very durable as long as too much polishing is avoided. Acid rain is another issue that is fortunately not in central Florida.

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